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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hedda, the prisioner
Hedda Gabler lives in an absolute prison. Her idylic residence is a prison, her marriage to a hopeful "ilustrious intellectual" is a prison, but above all, she lives imprisoned by herself, trapped by the social parameters that demand her to live the way she does. Hedda just can't figure out how to get out of that tedious state. She's intelligent, cold, severe;...
Published on April 3, 2000 by Dharmahopeful...

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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Boring Hedda
Hedda Gabler was a boring coniving woman. She married George Tesman only because she was getting older and she needed to be with someone of a decent status. Hedda and George are not a perfect match. Hedda prefers to live in a world of murder and mystery while George likes to research, read, and write books. Hedda obviously finds this boring since she grew up as a...
Published on September 30, 2003 by Yakima Johnson


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hedda, the prisioner, April 3, 2000
By 
Dharmahopeful... (Mexico City, Mexico) - See all my reviews
Hedda Gabler lives in an absolute prison. Her idylic residence is a prison, her marriage to a hopeful "ilustrious intellectual" is a prison, but above all, she lives imprisoned by herself, trapped by the social parameters that demand her to live the way she does. Hedda just can't figure out how to get out of that tedious state. She's intelligent, cold, severe; Gabler has an almost prodigious capacity to obtain all the information she inquires about the people around her; she manipulates them, she seems to get involved, but she simply tries to take advantage of the situation. Apparently, she doesn't feel much, but in reality, Hedda is in constant turmoil - her involvement has to do, almost exclusively, with what she just cannot allow herself to do.
For this woman, being able to have some sort of "power" over someone becomes the most exciting of all experiences, however - there's a point when she no longer will be able to manipulate the situation on her favor, she will realize how many forces have power over her; therefore, she will simply do the most congruent and coherent of things, as unexpected and shocking as the outcome of this play could possibly be.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hedda The Misunderstood, March 29, 2004
Aw Contrare my friends, Hedda was not bored, but trapped. A woman before her time, as most of Ibsen's female characters, unable to yield to the societal norms of the day. A strong, well educated woman existing in a time when permission to go out and about had to be asked of the dominant male of the house. The insurgence of the Industrial Revolution was taking place, the world was changing quickly, and with it old manors and chivalry was being extincted. These mores which Hedda had been raised to cling to were falling away for the world, but not for Hedda. They ran concourse to the blood in her veins.
Despite an inner strength of character and longing to dominate, inspire, and influence, she found herself torn between the new world and the way in which she was raised. Those values and their presence is signified by the silent character of her father, in the form of a picture that is continually refferred to.
When Hedda is overshadowed by Mrs. Elvstead in Lovborg's life she scrambles to make her mark, to have some influence. The nature of that inspiration is of no interest to her. As a madman who longs for fame and finds it in a violent act, Hedda does what she does for the power/influence in it, but not out of malice. Though we, the audience, may judge what her actions may have lead to, this is a moot avenue of perspective. It is "why" she does what she does that makes her such an intriguing character.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hedda Gabler was a remarkable play ahead of its time!, May 20, 1999
By A Customer
Henrik Ibsen was truly the Father of Modern Drama! His plays are much more "in-tune" with today's life than many scholars want to believe or will admit. Hedda was a powerful woman, who on the surface appeared to be confined by a dress, imprisoned in man's house, and smothered by a male-dominated society. It would appear that Thea Elvstead was the woman with more control, but this is not true. Hedda was a calculating "bitch" who dared (quite shrewdly) to cross over her set in stone "boundaries," manipulate others, and stand back and watch others lives be destroyed as a result. But when she is backed into a corner by the "new" creative couple (George & Thea) and Judge Brack, she takes the final power into her own hand. How ironic that the power is her late father's pistol. How tragic is her death when it was the ultimate control of a destiny that she so strongly desired? Henrik, you were a true visonary!!!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bravo! Bravo!, March 27, 2003
By 
"honeydick" (Toronto Canada) - See all my reviews
A great audio play which pulls the listener in and never lets go. As the story progresses the tension mounts and mounts until you can't take the suspense no longer. Juliet Stevenson does a superb job in portraying the manipulative but reckless Hedda and the rest of the cast are top notch. This is a brilliant presentation of ibsen's play showing the foibles of life and the dangers of desire. A wonderful audio experience to be listened to over and over again. Highly recommended. This audio book contains two CDs and is a full cast presentation of Ibsen's play Hedda Gabler.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Malicious Implacable Hedda Gabler, September 29, 2003
By 
joyce brown (Jersey City , NJ USA) - See all my reviews
Many people view Hedda as a heroine who was trapped in a world that was not comparable to her train of thought;however I view her as a malicious implacable twisted woman. Nothing in which she did suprised me at all. I felt no remorse in her passing but rather a deliberate sigh of relief. The only thing she ever had to offer was sarcastic insults and low blows to one's intelligence. At the age of 29 Hedda possed the strife and iniquity of a woman twice her age.

Hedda lives in a mans world having been raised by her father who was militant. She strives not to let being a woman hinder her from lifes adventures, so she goes things that most men do. She has a nick for blowing things up and anything that gets in her hands is destroyed. She made all women in her presence succomb to her aggressivenss, all men fell prey to her wit and beauty.

Hedda married Tesman to appear as if she was doing something with her life. He may have been inherently smart but he was naive to the ways of Hedda. Lovburg was a smart man and he could carry on a descent conversation with Hedda but he was pathetic in a sense. It seemed as if he lead a double life and I viewd him as being a drifter. The only person who was on her level of equal intelligence truly was Judge Brack. He understood her and read her like a book; they were literally the same person. He did find her escapades to be quite amusing but at the same time he kind of held a grudge towards her amybe from some past rendezvous.In the end his name Judge took total effect. He held Hedda's fate in his hand and she was not about to let him win that easily. Hedda didn't prove to bite as loud as her bark because she finished herself off when she lost power and control of a situation in which she started.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best translation for stage, April 24, 2003
By 
Didi (Sweet Briar, VA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Hedda Gabler (Paperback)
From the view of a Theater major, this translation and adaptation of Henrik Ibsen's 'Hedda Gabler' allows an audience (and a reader, for that matter) to follow all the intricate little jokes and personality quirks. Unlike other translations, the way each character speaks is distinct from all the others. The words aren't the only thing translated from the Norwegian; the nuances and attitudes are as well. George Tesman is amusingly obtuse, and his Auntie Julia isn't simply the sweet old lady she appears to be. Judge Brack and Hedda can share some wonderful inside jokes without the rest of the characters noticing. Eilert Lovborg isn't just bipolar in his actions but also in his words. And unlike many other translations, it is actually possible to be sympathetic to Hedda's situation and not simply loath her for her attitude. One of Ibsen's greatest talents is his way with words: the characters are forever saying one thing and meaning something entirely different. As 'Hedda Gabler' is a play, it is not meant to be simply read; it is meant to be seen, and Jon Robin Baitz certainly makes it easier for the actors to get across the message Ibsen was trying to send. And studying the play intensively during rehearsals and production of 'Hedda Gabler' really make it easier to appreciate exactly how much is going on. It takes much more than just a reading to understand 'Hedda': at its finest, it takes a really stellar cast, especially in the title role, to pull it off.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Interesting yet disturbing", February 26, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Hedda Gabler (Paperback)
A well written play which gives you a sense how how woman felt during the times of patriarchy. Hedda is an extrodinary character who is very complex but at the same time she is fairly simple to understand. Her evil doings are somewhat erased from our minds as we justify them, we feel pity towards Hedda because of the pityful life she is trapped in, the distorted views on life that Hedda poseses come to a climax toward the end and we understand a bit more about her character, however,just as we begin to understand her actions and feel pity towards her instead of hate we sadly discover her death at the end. A thoroughly interesting yet somewhat confusing? play!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a monster in a doll's body, April 19, 2001
hedda is a highly electrifying woman stuck in a loveless alliance with a bumbling fool. this steely woman lives by her poetic fantasies-- 'beauty, courage n freedom' thru lovborg (a brill man). lovborg is the ex-lover on which she lives vicariously as they share a 'bond of our common hunger for life'. hedda is driven to desperation by the masculine society she is born into. she was brought up by a militant father.. hence her fascination with pistols n things political n rejection of pregnancy. being the aristocrat she is, hedda loathes the bourgeoise n want for money.
this unwoman woman is a monster living in 'fear of scandal'. part of her time is engaged in power plays with 'fair' thea n brack, the connoisseur of life. it is amazing to see hedda switch mode frm 'clenched fists' 2 being 'calm n controlled'. as the play progresses, her aim of creating a dionsysian being in lovborg ceases dramatically. it affects her so profoundly she finds no meaning in life. her 'pretty illusion' of seeing lovborg with 'vineleaves in his hair' is dead. similarly, lesser beings were invading her pte sanctuary she holds so sacred ('inner rm').. n tt leads to her timely yet shocking death.
who is the tragic hero of the play? hedda or lovborg? hedda is not as strong n dynamic as we liken her to be. she ends in a brittle yet poignant note. what is so striking is the simplicity in which ibsen used to portray his ideas. the audience is often left dumb-founded by the disturbing n perverse themes-- death n vicarious living. also, his use of greek mythology (apollo, dionysus, diana) is very interesting as it delves deeper into the chac.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautifully structured play of a misunderstood woman., June 11, 2006
This review is from: Hedda Gabler (Paperback)
This play is a very profound character study of a quite extra-ordinary woman. Hedda Gabler is an anti-heroine. She is a woman with strong ideals who has failed to find her way in the world. What an actress is required to play this complex part! I'm not sure who could handle the part right now, but I couldn't help but imagine Bette Davis in it. She would have been able to handle the complexity of this woman whose ideals for a perfect life were so unattainable, and who could not bear to live if those ideals couldn't be met. Hedda found that she couldn't manipulate everyone around her in order to achieve her goals either, so she put a bullet through her head because it all seemed so futile to her. This play is a definite characterization play, and so is different than a lot of Ibsen's other plays which were social-problem plays.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "you can always hope...to be top dog?", October 5, 2003
By 
morgannie (Los Angeles, CA United States) - See all my reviews
Hedda Gabler. Created by Ibsen at the turn of the last century, this character can still find its place comfortably amongst contemporary literature. Hedda's sweeping dark and private personality, from her purposely bitter remarks to her burning up a saved manuscript, lets the reader in on some insight as to the constant turning and scheming that goes on in her mind. Her world is one as ironic as it is constricted and in her own ways and through her own methods, can she try to make the most of what she determines life should be.
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Hedda Gabler
Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen (Paperback - September 1, 2005)
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