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Heidegger's Hut Hardcover – October 27, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 163 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press (October 27, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262195518
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262195515
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 0.5 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,402,271 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Heidegger's cabin in the Black Forest has been the focal point of his work, and it has been shrouded in mystery and rumor. Adam Sharr has cast on it the light of diligent research, architectural expertise, and liberal judgment, and he has given us a clearer idea of where Heidegger's thought has come from." Albert Borgmann, Regents Professor of Philosophy, The University of Montana



"As Adam Sharr reveals in his remarkable study Heidegger's Hut, the philosopher's timber-shingled cabin (which had no running water and, at least for the first decade, no electricity) can be interpreted as a locus of contemplation, a romantic escape, and a place where, given the politically problematic nature of Heidegger's writings, fascist over-tones cannot but linger" Andrea Walker Bookforum



Heidegger's Hut, a slim, provocative volume, answers the question: Why the architectural interest in the drab, three room, 20-foot square Black Forest hut without running water or electricity inhabited by the German philosopher Martin Heidegger throughout his career? Norman Weinstein Architectural Record



" Heidegger"s Hut is and is not a book about a hut. It"s about how a place inspired a life"s work, and how that work inspired modern architectural theory and, to a lesser degree, the sustainability movement.... Many of the book"s photos are posed, though the light is beautiful. The hut has a confidence, a rightness that is oddly indisputable, making in the end, even the philosopher"s work seem transient and insubstantial." The Los Angeles Times

About the Author

Adam Sharr is Lecturer in Architecture at the Welsh School of Architecture at Cardiff University and a practicing architect.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Stefan Buchta on November 16, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I found this book when the summer was still young, read every page several times over, with greatest pleasure! What a thinkers' paradise Heidegger's wife built there for her husband (a sign in Todnauberg contradicts Sharr's book, suggesting that Heideggers wife built the hut from her inheritance -- she was familiar with the village from ski holidays).

Here one finds embodied in a building Zengetsu's suggestion for the Zen student, "Poverty is your treasure. Don't exchange it for an easy life".

Of course it is difficult for anyone, including Heidegger himself, to really make sense of the place. It has significance only for Heidegger the thinker, as a place that came to support and sustain his thinking, in which he could be creative, in which he felt comfortable. He probably dind't know himself why this place "worked" for him and it probably would not work for anyone else (unless you grew up near the High Black forest and were intimately familiar with the landscape and its people). For Nietsche it was the Engadin, for Heidegger the High Black Forest -- German thinkers seem to have a long tradition of attachment to place and so do Japanese. So, does Sharr's book really have any significance beyond the pretty pictures?

I think it does. It made me contemplate when and where I will build my own hut. It made me understand embodiment. The simplicity of the philosopher's hut keeps reminding me of what is truly essential and strips away everything else. Here Heidegger could dwell directly in the elements of unpolluted-by-modernity-life itself -- the wind, the trees, the rocks, the traditions of the region.
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18 of 26 people found the following review helpful By o dubhthaigh VINE VOICE on February 20, 2007
Format: Hardcover
If you have an interest in Heidegger, this is a clever little monogram on the place where Heidegger wrote or was inspired throughout the course of his career. The funny thing is, it is such a meager, crappy little hut that I guess he had no choice but to think profoundly. As architecture - well, it's laughably German: bare essentials, hardly comfortable, no cross ventilation, no indoor plumbing. And somehow that last factor takes the wind, so to speak, out of all that hermeneutics. Nothing like imagining Martin bent over a log to de-mythologize one of humanity's greatest thinkers.

The hut is still in the hands of his family, so it is not really a tourist site, but there is enough interest for the local government to signpost it and then ask everyone to respect the family's privacy. The black and white photos are collected from a series done in the sixties, and the author notes that they are somewhat staged. That's alright. It gives you the impression of how close the quarters were. Spartan is far too luxurious a concept. Nonetheless, this is where Martin came to follow those paths that led to the clearings wherein he began to consider how to uncover what had been appropriated. And all that is to say, that for its barren uncomfortableness, it is all the more remarkable that it was in such a setting that such piety was contemplated.

In short, the hut had precious little to do with it, I suppose. The landscape must be spectacular. Considering who came to visit him here, it is all the more remarkable. The place must have reeked. My estimation and admiration for both Elfride Heidegger and Hannah Arendt has increased exponentially. If you have had any experience travelling with Germans over the summer, you'll know what I'm talking about.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steiner VINE VOICE on April 20, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Martin Heidegger was a thinker of dwelling. His essays after the so called 'turn' indicate an increasing preoccupation with one's environment, dwelling, and world. Adam Sharr is an architect who has done a tremendous job presenting a visual representation of Heidegger's famous place of work in Todtnauberg (the black and white photographs in this monograph are extraordinary) while attempting to link the place of Heidegger's work with the work. Unfortunately, Sharr's knowledge of Heidegger's philosophy is clearly a bit weak, and this text often borders on fetishism. Still, an intimate picture of this notoriously isolated thinker emerges as Sharr traces the particular significance of this location for Heidegger's lifelong pursuit into the meaning of being.
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful By rdf on December 29, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It discusses the hut from an architectural perspective, situating it in valley & comparing it to his city home.

It gives a good sense of what it would be like to have used it in the way Heidegger did, without overreaching into architectural determinism.
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2 of 9 people found the following review helpful By E. A. Dijkstra on September 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is really nice small book, well written, illustrations throughout the book, etc. As some of the finer details concern a.o. the colours of the hut, the colours (?) of Heidegger's thinking and his direct environment, it should have been done in full colour. This book gave me some brilliant insights and saves me a lot of time. I'm now sure I will never read anything from Heidegger, sorry Martin.
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