Heidi: Adapted for Young Readers and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Heidi (Children's Classics) Hardcover – September 1, 1998


See all 105 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, September 1, 1998
$4.50 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$4.25

Summertime is Book Time
Make summertime book time with our featured reading lists for kids. No Kindle? No problem. Download our free Kindle app and bring your books wherever you go.

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Johanna Spyri's classic story of a young orphan sent to live with her grumpy grandfather in the Swiss Alps is retold in it's entirety in this beautifully bound hardcover edition. Heidi has charmed and intrigued readers since it's original publication in 1880. Much more than a children's story, the narrative is also a lesson on the precarious nature of freedom, a luxury too often taken for granted. Heidi almost loses her liberty as she is ripped away from the tranquility of the mountains to tend to a sick cousin in the city. Happily, all's well that ends well, and the reader is left with only warm, fuzzy thoughts. Spryi's story will never grow wearisome--and this is a very appealing edition. --Naomi Gesinger

From Publishers Weekly

This truncated retelling of orphan Heidi's simple life in the Swiss Alps and her sojourn in the big city seems almost as indebted to the Shirley Temple film as to Johanna Spyri's 1880 novel. Krupinski's (A New England Scrapbook) heroine mimics Temple, curls, button nose and all, though she lacks the actress's expressive smile and gestures. Similarly blank-faced characters contrast with Krupinski's serene, lushly idealized landscape paintings: the people seem like wax dolls, but the glowing blankets of flowers make the Alps heaven on earth. The text emphasizes the sensual joys of fresh goat's milk, fir trees "with their piney scent," Heidi's sweet-smelling bed in her grandfather's hay loft, etc., but that is its only demonstrable strength. Both Heidi's relationship with her grandfather and the idealized subplot about wheelchair-bound Klara's learning to walk are woodenly described; little space is given to dialogue and even less to Heidi's emotions. The plot, too, is severely condensed: "Many more good things happened after that day." The book succeeds as a portrayal of the joys of mountain life, but otherwise fails to do justice to Spyri's story of a girl's courage and persistence. Ages 5-9.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Series: Children's Classics
  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Children's Classics (September 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0517189674
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517189672
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 1 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #967,264 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Gary F. Taylor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 5, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Modern adaptations tend to reduce HEIDI to the distastefully saccharine--and as such do a tremendous disservice to Swiss author Johanna Spyri, whose original 1880 novel is a surprisingly sophisticated work founded on a solid plot line and including exceptionally well-rounded characters and memorably rendered descriptions of both the Alpine peasantry and the German aristocracy.

When hardnosed Aunt Dete has the opportunity to secure better employment, she wastes little time in unloading five year old and orphaned Heidi on the child's grandfather, a Swiss peasant whose personal tragedies have led him to a life of isolation in the Alps. Heidi quickly penetrates her grandfather's superficial gruffness; he quickly grows to love the child and she in turn becomes a local favorite. Several years later, however, Dete is motivated by guilt to have second thoughts about the child's welfare, and snatches Heidi from the Alps to become the companion of the wealthy but invalid child Klara, who resides in Frankfurt.

Transported to this alien city so abruptly, Heidi pines for both the Alps and her grandfather even as she comes to love Klara. She also upsets the rigidly ordered household, personified by housekeeper by the unpleasant but comical Miss Rottenmeier. When Klara's sensible grandmother suggests Heidi take her problems to God, the child does precisely that, and after several disappointments discovers that her situation is part of a larger plan that will lead to a greater happiness for all concerned.

HEIDI was written at a time when children were expected to be able to read far beyond the scope of that which we expect of modern children. As a result, it is a children's novel written that is indeed a novel in every sense of the word, including length.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By LindaT VINE VOICE on September 15, 2002
Format: Hardcover
A while back when I was in my 30's (never mind how long ago that was!) I was sick with the flu, and I found a copy of HEIDI, so I crawled into a nice warm bed and re-read the book -- as an adult.
What insight into human nature! And as an adult I appreciated the dry, understated humor. I also appreciated the spiritual insights -- that God will give us what we desire, but sometims uses circumstances we don't like to teach us truths that we couldn't learn otherwise.
When I was a girl I was often turned off by what was called "good reading," but for some reason, I enjoyed Heidi and it never seemed sappy or corny.
Very much worth reading!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 20, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Heidi is a very good book about a girl who is being switched from
family to family because nobody really wants her but she teaches
a little girl how to walk instead of using a wheelchair and teaches a boy how to read when nobody else believes she can do it
but she does and everybody learns to believe you can do something
if you just put your mind to it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "kristen1315" on January 23, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Heidi is about a young girl that has lived with her Aunt Dete all of her life. Her Aunt has had enough of her so she sends her up a mountain to her Grandfather. The People of the town are very surprised at what Heidi's Aunt is about to do. They try to warn her but she won't listen. When Heidi and her Aunt get up the Alm, they find that the "Alm Uncle" is not very happy with their arrival. The Aunt doesn't care, she tells the Grandfather that she has taken care of the child long enough. She leaves and never comes back. After years of staying with her Granfather, Heidi learns how to live freely and finds new friends in high places. She learns about the mountains and the cold winters up on the Alm. As Heidi gets older her Aunt Dete comes up again and tells the Grandfather that Heidi needs to go to school. The Grandfather refuses, but eventually gives in. Dete takes Heidi to the city where she finds a new friend, Clara. Clara has to sit in a wheel chair. If you want to know why, read the book! Heidi gets into all kinds of mischieve there, she misses the mountains and can't understand why there aren't any trees. Heidi gets so homesick they have to send her back to the Alm. Clara and the other residents promise to visit her sometime in the summer. The book ends up that Clara and her Grandmother go and visit Heidi and they have the most wonderful time that they never wanted to leave. As there stay at the Alm goes on, the mountain air and hearty food strengthen Clara to where she can walk. Clara and her Grandmother leave with the promise of coming back again.
I really liked this book. It was very real, in a sense that brought you into the actual story. When I read the book, I almost wished I was there in the book listening to their conversations, or eating at their little dinner table.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By jprivero@i40.net on October 17, 1998
Format: Hardcover
The original, unabridged version of Heidi transports you to the Swiss Alps and places you with people who are natural and unaffected. Even the wealthy city dwellers who "employ" Heidi have her best interests at heart. I especially enjoyed how Heidi discovers a personal relationship with God in the midst of her sadness; taught by a caring grandmother.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Evelyn Horan on May 22, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Heidi is one of the first books I read as a youngster. I can still recall the wonderful description of life in the mountainous Alps with her beloved grandfather. Then to be taken to a less happy home, away from the mountains, and to share in Heidi's daily-life experiences and page-turning adventures holds attention to the very end of the book, which ends happily, much to the reader's relief. Heidi is a character all young girls should get to know...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?