Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Heir of Sea and Fire Mass Market Paperback – March 12, 1980


See all 20 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, Import
"Please retry"
$0.05
Mass Market Paperback, March 12, 1980
$24.95 $0.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 215 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey; reprint edition (March 12, 1980)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345288823
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345288820
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,695,469 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

By the vow of her father and her own desire, Raederle was pledged to Morgon, Riddle-Master of Hed. But a year had passed since Morgon disappeared on his search for the High One at Erlenstar Mountain, and rumors claimed he was dead.
Raederle set out to learn the truth for herself, though her small gift of magic seemed too slight for the perils she must face. The quest led through strange lands and dangerous adventures. Only her growing powers enabled her at last to reach Erlenstar Mountain. And there she discovered what she could not bear to accept.
Accompanied by Deth, the High One's Harper, she fled. And behind them came a pursuer whose name was Morgon, bent on executing a grim destiny upon Raederle and Deth.
Her only hope lay in summoning the Hosts of the Dead, led by the King whose skull she bore . . . --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 11 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 11, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In most trilogies, the middle volume is the weak one, tying beginning and end together with too little plot. Patricia McKillip skillfully avoids this pitfall in "Heir of Sea and Fire," the second slim volume in her Riddlemaster trilogy, and the story of Raederle, the second most beautiful woman in An.
A year has passed since Morgan of Hed vanished at Erlenstar Mountain, and suddenly the land-rule passes to Morgan's brother -- a sign that Morgan is dead, that the harpist Deth has betrayed him. As he was the Star-Bearer, assorted people are extremely upset. And a few refuse to believe that it can be true.
Raederle's father is one of them; after he leaves, his daughter meets the Morgul of Herun, and her brother in Caithnard. There she teams up with the Morgul's daughter, Lyra (whom Morgan met in "Riddlemaster") who is angry at Morgan's supposed death, and eager to accompany Raederle wherever she goes. They set off on a ship, going to Erlenstar Mountain, and soon find that aside from Raederle, Lyra, and Lyra's fellow guards, they also have Tristan of Hed stowed away (who is promptly seasick).
Raederle finds out that Morgan has recently appeared, kept captive by the mysterious and evil Ghisteslwchlohm, and betrayed by Deth -- who is now on the run from everyone. But as Raederle's questions are answered, more pop up. She encounters a shapechanger, and then runs into Deth camping in the woods. Answers about the High One, about Morgan, and about her own abilities and heritage begin to come to light, as the dead of An begin to blaze back into existance. Raederle must bargain with fate and a dead king, using only her newfound powers and a crowned skull, to save Morgan -- and the rapidly unraveling world.
Wow, where to begin?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 28, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Having read this series in order beginning with The Riddlemaster of Hed, I knew this second book would not immediately answer all of the urgent riddles posed by the climax at the end of book one. The viewpoint shifts from Morgon in the first book to his lady love in the second book. And Raederle is a very believable heroine. She is brave and determined, but there are limitations to how women in this medieval-like society go questing. Therefore her adventures do not merely follow in Morgon's footsteps. She has her own set of riddles to answer, and she finds different ways to answer them. Once again there is more depth to this book than one read-through will unfurl, and readers both young and mature can find significance and pleasure in its pages. The vivid word pictures, innovative magic, and facinating characterizations all enhance an adventure story of myth and wisdom. But still there is a hint of unsatisfaction. The story is incomplete, and riddles go unanswered...until the next installment.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 13, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I would highly recommend this book, and indeed, the whole series, to any fantasy reader. Admittedly, I have not read all of Ms. McKillip's offerings, but I have read extensively in this field, and I found this to be a highly moving, intelligent, and succinct trilogy. Heir of Sea and Fire is especially integral to the reading of the series, as it is, after all, the second and middle book. I just want to ask, who flubbed up and let this one go out of print, while leaving the first and last in print? What a loss!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. A. Lovitt HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on February 4, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The heir of sea and fire referred to in the title is Raederle, Morgon of Hed's betrothed, and the main character of this second book in McKillip's 'Riddle-Master' trilogy. She struggles against her shape-changer heritage, but gradually begins to tap into its power in order to protect Morgon. "Heir of Sea and Fire" begins in the spring of the year "following the strange disappearance of the Prince of Hed, who had, with the High One's harpist, vanished like a mist in Isig Pass..."

Raederle has reason to believe Morgon dead, since the land-rule of Hed has passed to Morgon's brother, Eliard. Or was land-rule ripped from Morgon while he was still alive? In a key passage, Raederle asks the High One's harpist, "What piece of knowledge did the Founder expect to find beneath the knowledge of when the barley would begin to sprout or what trees in his orchard had a disease eating secretly at their hearts?"

The importance of the question lies in the inability of the harpist to answer it.

As with all quest fantasies, this book has some long, relatively dull journeying to be gotten out of the way. Characters get seasick, lost, confused. It rains a lot. Raederle keeps losing jeweled pins out of her hair. Plus I'm not nearly as fond of the Morgol and her guards as is the author, and they don't add much to the plot. Perhaps in the years following the publication of this book (1977), we have all become used to spear-wielding maidens. And battle scenes are battle scenes no matter how much they're juiced up with magic.

But there are also some great visuals in "Heir of Sea and Fire," especially in the sequence where Raederle calls up the dead of An and bargains with them to protect the man who is journeying across their land.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?