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Hell Hath No Curry: A Pennsylvania Dutch Mystery Hardcover – February 6, 2007

21 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In Myers's over-the-top 15th crime caper starring Amish-Mennonite sleuth and innkeeper Magdalena Yoder (after 2006's Grape Expectations), the corpse du jour is the once-handsome scoundrel Cornelius Weaver, who may have been murdered by any one of seven women—his lovers. Familiar cast members provide the usual foils to Magdalena's running (and often very tired) jokes and too-breezy banter as she worries about her looks and upcoming mixed faith marriage to Dr. Gabriel Rosen more than she does about her investigation of Cornelius's killer. The thin plot is so improbable and haphazard, it's a relief but no great surprise when Magdalena closes that case and solves another murder as well. Cornelius's death-by-painkiller-laced Indian dish inspires the curry-themed recipes sandwiched between chapters. Maybe it's time to close the kitchen and order takeout? (Feb.)
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About the Author

Tamar Myers, who is of Mennonite background, is the author of the Pennsylvania Dutch mysteries and the Den of Antiquity series.
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Product Details

  • Series: Pennsylvania Dutch Mystery (Book 15)
  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: NAL Hardcover (February 6, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451220331
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451220332
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 1.1 x 8.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,353,265 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Tamar Myers, who is of Mennonite background, is the author of the Pennsylvania Dutch mysteries and the Den of Antiquity series. Born and raised in the Congo, she lives in North Carolina.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Sus_S on March 12, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I picked "Hell Hath No Curry" out of force of habit more than anything else. I discovered Tamar Myers in an airport where I picked up "Just Plain Pickled to Death" and the Den of Antiquity mystery--the one about the silver tea set-- that actually involves Abby & Co. traveling to Magdalena's hometown. At first I loved Ms. Myers' offbeat sense of humor and even the little self-deprecating self references and the occasional self promotions. Somewhere along the way, the tone of the books changed and I have not enjoyed the last several entries in either series. Again, I read them out of habit but I didn't enjoy them nearly as much I had enjoyed earlier entries.

That being said, I had fun reading "Hell Hath No Curry". It *sounded* more like the earlier books, although I wish Freni, Mose, and Susannah had more active roles. I love the original secondary characters. I even missed Melvin the teensiest bit.

If you're a die-hard Mags fan, definitely read this book. If you're a semi-fan, well, if nothing else, you can always amuse yourself by playing a drinking game--take one shot every time you come across the phrase "sturdy Christian underwear".
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By I. L. Young on August 18, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I just discovered this series about 7 months ago and have now read every book in order. Ms. Myers started off with a good idea, some clever writing, fair to middling plots and a few interesting recipies. Over the series everything has declined to the point that by this book, which may (or should) be the last in the series that there are no ideas, the barest of plots, and poor writing. The recipies remained interesting, but Ms. Myers acknowledges that they all come from another source. I actually had to hunt to find any reference (other than the recipies) to "curry" in this book to at least explain the title. There isn't one.

By reading the entire series in a short time span I was able to note that the author favors repeating jokes in each book and does not favor reviewing her past efforts for continuity. Characters' names change, others are introduced and then dissappear. Plot elements, e.g. a new familial relationship, are presented and then left dangling, One sub-plot (Custard's Last Stand) even hinged on the dissapperance of a character some years prior to the book's start even though that character was alive and well in the immediatly preceeding book the events of which supposedly took place three months earlier.

Its time to stick a fork in the series--its done.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By John S. on February 27, 2007
Format: Hardcover
After reading the first couple of pages, I wondered if the publisher had put the wrong cover on the book? The "voice" of Magdalena sounded completely off! Myers does get back into the more familair Mags, but never completely so. There are enough of Myers' own touches that I'll discount the possibility of a ghostwriter, although the thought did occur to me. Her sister makes a token appearance or two; Zelda Root is referenced a couple of times.

If I had to guess, I'd say Myers summoned up just enough interest to push through this book to fulfill her contractual obligation. To be honest, if that contract has another book or two remaining, she and the publisher ought to work out a deal - she's pretty clearly not interested, which shows, so readers might be leery of reading the series further. I know I am.

I want to emphasize that I still believe Ms. Myers to be a great writer. I'd love to see a completely new series for her.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Karen Potts on March 20, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Magdalena Yoder is back and is investigating the death of Cornelius Weaver, the town's most eligible bachelor. Despite the fact that he was engaged to be married, Cornelius was carrying on affairs with several women in town. Magdalena interviews each of Cornelius's girlfriends in an attempt to find out who murdered him. The dialogue in this book is pretty silly and the repetitive jokes become tiresome. The "mystery" gets lost in the silliness and by the end, the reader won't really care who dunnit. It may be time for this series to come to an end.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Roger Long on July 15, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I was fearful that Tamar Myers was losing the oomph to this series of mysteries that feature Magdalena Portulaca Yoder, the Mennonite innkeeper, detective, mayor, and wealthiest resident of Hernia, Pennsylvania. But this offering far exceeded my hopes and expectations. This book is the very best of the lot.

The plot is almost unimportant. Sure, there's a murder, but it occurs early and we never meet the victim. The atmosphere is no better than okay. What makes this book really fun to read is the central character, as she goes about trying to find who murdered the local lothario who was having affairs with any number of Hernians. Magdalena has a curious world view, one that I like very much. She treats the reader to a running commentary on religion, language, plastic surgery, modesty, physiques, literature, child rearing, food, oh, just any number of things--and they are all funny, often with an underlying layer of truth. It's that truth that makes them funny. Magdalena is not nearly so naive as she would have us believe at times. She's horny. She's greedy. She's willing to bend a principle if it serves her purpose. She's extremely human, in other words.

Tamar Myers is in rare form with this book. I recommend it highly.
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