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Hell In A Very Small Place Hardcover – January 1, 1966


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Hell In A Very Small Place + Street Without Joy + Bernard Fall: Memories of a Soldier-Scholar
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 515 pages
  • Publisher: J. B. Lippincott; First Edition edition (1966)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1568659156
  • ISBN-13: 978-1568659152
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.8 x 1.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,116,958 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By P. Cugno on July 27, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Bernard Fall obviously did extensive research for this work, and his writing style is so invoking, so compelling. He covers all aspects: An almost diary-like account of battle itself, the reasons why it was fought, the international haggling and politics involved in trying to save the Dien Bien Phu garrison.

Most importantly, he puts you right in the midst of the battle. When you read this book, you can actually feel the emotions: The fear of going through another Viet Minh barrage, and the tension before yet another infantry attack; the determination of fighting for survival, or to save comrades; the satisfaction after a successful counterattack, and the frustration of dealing with uncomprehending leadership in Hanoi. If you're a fan of military history, this book will not disappoint you. In fact, it will be something you'll take off your bookshelf, time and again.
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By Kug VINE VOICE on October 14, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Simply an outstanding book on the Vietnam War and the French presence there. It is the final battle of the French. Captivating and identifying the Vietnamese for who they are. America doesn't learn from history because we are still trying to bomb people into submission. The value of this book is found in the heart of the Vietnamese people. I fought in the Vietnam War and have the utmost respect for the mass of Vietnamese people and their indomitable spirit. This book portrays that.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Bernard Fall was the most knowledgeable author of that place and time. His background as a teenaged French resistance fighter during WW II, followed with a doctorate degree and a career in teaching and journalism made him the most qualified 'embedded reporter' of his generation. Most journalists like Cronkite wanted photo ops and controversy or blood and guts stories for the News at 6. Fall saw a nation tearing itself apart and wanted to help America really understand how it might contribute to a workable outcome. Like Ernie Pyle of WW II, he lived in the boonies with soldiers and understood a combat soldier's life. More than that, he had been in Vietnam since the 1950s and had developed a passion for understanding the people, personalities and politics of Southeast Asia. As a result he wrote a great number of books which should have been mandatory reading at CG&S and the US Army War College by 1964 instead of talking doctrinal issues, Field Manuals and listening to the 'guest sleepers'. In any case, Fall did a great job replaying the French debacle and Viet Minh victory at Dien Bien Phu. It is a classic story of military hubris and should be found in the home library of all career military officers and NCOs. More importantly we see the beginnings of American support for the French in Indochina and a growing fear of all things politically Red without a clue of understanding about the oppositional leadership. If you like Fall, then 'Street Without Joy' is a must read as is 'The Two Vietnams'. Fall died in 1967 while covering an operation with the US Marines after hitting a landmine.
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