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Hellblazer: Original Sins Paperback – October 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo (October 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563890526
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563890529
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #749,824 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Astonishing... Constantine's looking pretty damned good" - Empire "John Constantine is the most human character in mainstream comics today... A journey you can't afford to miss." - Neil Gaiman, author of The Sandman" --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Jamie Delano is a veteran comics writer and is the co-creator of John Constantine. His work includes Outlaw Nation and 20/20 Visions. John Ridgway is a British comics artist whose work includes Judge Dredd (and other 2000 AD stories), The Spiral Path, Young Miracleman and more. Alfredo Alcala's work includes Weird War Tales, Tarzan, Savage Sword of Conan and Planet of the Apes. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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If you are a fan of the film, check out the book.
physalis17
What a great first book, I've already purchased an older version of the second one, Dangerous Habits, at a local Comic-Con.
jay
It's definitely a good read, filled with strong, emotional writing and gritty, interesting characters.
Michele Lee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By J. Carroll VINE VOICE on January 20, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
John Constantine made his mark in these stories from the first 9 issues of HELLBLAZER. Beginning with "Hunger," where Constantine has to "bottle up" a demon before it consumes a whole city, the reader is introduced to a man who doesn't fight for heaven or hell, but rather to save mankind from getting caught in between. Using whatever means necessary, including the lives of anyone who is too close to him, Constantine rages against the unfairness of it all. Fueled by Jamie Delano's rage of Britain's and America's system of government and economy, Constantine battles yuppie demons and stands against both the Resurrection Crusaders and the Damnation Army in his hope that man will be allowed to make their own mistakes. However, the art doesn't help tell the story. Ridgeway's work is extremely "scratchy" and only the addition of Alcala's inks at the end of the collection make things This collection is a bit dated, with its Thatcher references and a connection to the Swamp-Thing series that hampers understanding of all the references, but it is a solid beginning. And it does make you wonder...What exactly did happen at Newcastle?"
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19 of 24 people found the following review helpful By isala on February 3, 2005
Format: Paperback
With the new film soon out I thought that I should defend this comic book. I fear that the film will remove everything that is good, which is not unusual for Hollywood anyway! First of all I have serious doubts about Keanu Reeves as Constantine. Why not Jude Law?
John Constantine, is a punk-gothic anti-hero. He has a conscience, but it is hidden behind too much cynicism, alcohol, and tobacco. He has seen too much. His world is not the cosy world of nine-to-five jobs, or simple cause and effect. He is a mage, albeit a minor one. In the comics he is first and foremost a facilitator. He is one of the few that can move freely in both 'normal' and supernatural society. Of course, that leaves a twisted mind.
What really made this comic stand how it delivered its political message. All stories in this collection are very political, but they deliver their message in a very allegorical form. They chill me out because they capture so well the atmosphere of the 1980s, or the 2000s for that matter! The portray a spiritual poverty that opens up doors for forces both from heaven and hell to enter and exploit.
Some stories deal with the people that are just out to make money, other, more frightening stories, deal with the forces of hell and heaven that are trying to take over our daily lives. Yuppies are created by demons from hell and satan worshippers sacrifice runaway children. By far the most dangerous threat is posed by the well-organised and fanatical christian fundamentalists. Try the truly shocking story "When Johnny comes marching home" which deals with the scars left by the Vietnam war on the US. This is my favourite since it really transcends the classical horror genre and creates something truly new.
Read more ›
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By N. Durham HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
Originally a supporting character brought to life by visionary comic scribe Alan Moore in his legendary run on Swamp Thing, the hard drinking, hard smoking, bad luck magic mage named John Constantine got his own series with Hellblazer. Collecting the first nine issues of the series written by Jamie Delano and drawn by John Ridgeway, Original Sins is really nothing special compared to the following volumes helmed by various creators. Delano's story is sufficient enough, albeit sometimes incoherent, while Ridgeway's art is nothing more than average at best. However, Original Sins is a nice starting point for newer Hellblazer readers (of which there possibly will be more with the upcoming release of the feature film entitled Constantine with Keanu Reeves in the starring role) and it only gets better from this point forward. Future volumes which feature work by future Preacher creators Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, Transmetropolitan creator Warren Ellis, 100 Bullets scribe Brian Azzarello, and current writer Mike Carey, are much better and amazing comic work, and are more than worth your time.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
Excellent excellent read. I came across it while plumbing through the DC/Vertigo titles and have greatly enjoyed the entire series.
This is a THICK book and full of the old stories that were printed years ago. But if you're a graphic novel fan (as opposed to comic books), you proably haven't seen these. The one about "Yuppie Soul Brokers From Hell" is especially fun.
Between this and the Sandman series, I've been very impressed by the quality of the genre.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By G. Rao on September 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
I got into this series after going through 6 compiled editions of Alan Moore's Saga Of The Swamp Thing. John Constantine is introduced in that series as a smirking, supercilious mystery-man who leads Swampy on a series of increasingly bizarre encounters with the supernatural world, taunting and playing mind games with him the entire time.

In the Hellblazer series, Constantine is fleshed out a bit more, and shown to be an actual human being, with fear and doubt and sleepless nights spent in the company of ghostly tormentors. I think the writer, Jamie Delano, gives the character a great deal of depth, and smartly uses the plot twists to give shape to his complex psyche.

The other thing that makes these stories interesting is the art style. I find the artwork to be almost impressionistic in its depictions. It gives everything an ambiguous, grainy quality that really underscores the mood. The mood is crucial, because without it, these stories wouldn't have the emotional nuance to carry the demons-and-brimstone theme around without seeming a bit silly.

Each chapter seems to be introduced with some sort of poem, which is a nice little touch.

I'm reading the series in chronological order, and as I'm writing this, I'm embarking on the follow up compilation, The Devil You Know, also written by Delano. It may turn out that other writers of this series are able to accomplish more than what Delano has, but so far, it is a solidly written series, that's very easy to jump right into.
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