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Hellboy, Vol. 8: Darkness Calls Paperback – May 13, 2008


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Hellboy, Vol. 8: Darkness Calls + Hellboy, Vol. 7: The Troll Witch and Other Stories + Hellboy, Vol. 9: The Wild Hunt
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Dark Horse Books; Volume 8 edition (May 13, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 159307896X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593078966
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 0.3 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #56,007 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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I enjoyed this book the best out of all the Hellboy stories to come out after him leaving the BPRD.
Uthor
The art is also very well done; a good compromise between the new artists style and sort of a spiritual continuation of Mignola's thick shadows and simplicity.
JR Gumby
Fegredo does his best to emulate Mignola's art style, and the book retains the limited color pallet common to the series.
Michael Schwarz

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Michael Schwarz on July 1, 2008
Format: Paperback
Sometimes art doesn't matter. Sometimes it's the writing that carries a book through. Up to now, the Hellboy series has been a delicate balance between writing and artwork. Mignola's art is exceptional, and his writing is slightly more then above average. Unfortunatly this outing replaces his art with Duncan Fegredo's.

Fegredo is good, but, it is defiantly a step down from Mignola's work. Fortunately, Mignola continues the writing duties, which may well be the only reason the book really works.

Fegredo does his best to emulate Mignola's art style, and the book retains the limited color pallet common to the series. Unfortunately his art, which, while quite good, is also quite cluttered, and would probably benefit from a broader selection of colors. What his art lacks is the elegant surrealism that Mignola creates. The story itself retains every bit of Mignola's flavor, style and pacing.

If your primary interest in Mignola's work is in his writing, then this is every bit as good as what came before, as Hellboy explores a world of Russian folklore. If your love for the series comes primarily from his art, then expect to be disappointed. It's still Hellboy, but, somehow it feels less fluid then you've come to expect over the last 14 years.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Darrell T May on May 28, 2008
Format: Paperback
This is not only a great story, but it also has amazing art. The artist who worked on this book did an amazing job that definitely impressed me. Being a fan of Mike's art work, I can sometimes me skeptical of other people that pick up the torch and illustrate his books. The art is amazing and I recommend it to any fan of Hellboy.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Beth Dettwyler on August 2, 2008
Format: Paperback
I won't go into the plot much here, but I'll say this: close-read this one. Don't be surprised if you finish it quickly, only to find yourself missing a thing or two. Read it over a second time, taking it in slowly, and it should all fall into place.

That would be my main criticism, actually: Fegredo doesn't have the same sort of "leading" style that Mignola does, so it can be a challenge to know where the artist wants you to look. That interferes with the flow of the comic a little, and makes the circumstances of the initial conflict a little confusing.

Also, as much as Hellboy hates it, his adversaries usually talk more! The Council of Witches don't explicitly state what their problem is, and Gruagach (Hellboy: The Corpse) is vague as can be about what he's lugging around in that box. It's a little reminiscent of a short-lived Guy Davis project, the noir-superheroic "Nevermen", in that you have to read very closely, and even then, you have to infer some details.

I thoroughly enjoyed the tour through Russian history, though, and Mignola indulges us with a fight scene that, reminiscent of "The Wolves of Saint August" from The Chained Coffin and Other Stories (vol. 3), takes many pages indeed to come to a proper resolution. It's worth it, though: we get a stronger sense of the forces at work, and, as always, we see mythological figures taking themselves way too seriously. A delight!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. LaGory on July 26, 2009
Format: Paperback
When Hellboy creator Mike Mignola passed the art duties to Duncan Fegredo, many complained. Many were worried the book would lose it's original tone, or that Mike was getting lazy, whatever. I, however, was not reading comics at the time of this announcement. I'm glad that this is the case, because as a result I came onto reading Hellboy just as this collected volume hit stores. I gobbled up every tidbit of the Hellboy universe in a few weeks, and finally arrived at this beauty of a book. I knew from first glance that while Mignola's art would be sorely missed, we were getting a taste of something that was almost equally fantastic. First of all, it collects a hefty 6 issues + epilogue, making it bigger than the other Hellboy miniseries. The slightly longer format gives the book an epic feel as Hellboy stumbles through a mythological Russian wasteland. The art could not be any truer to Mignola's style without Mike himself drawing the book. Dave Stewart's colors remind us that this is indeed a real Hellboy story, as does the script and tone of the work.

Fear not, Hellboy fans. This story will not let you down, and by the end of it you'll be thrilled to know that Fegredo is staying on the book for a long time, virtually guaranteeing more Hellboy issues per year. It has been announced that the epic story beginning in Darkness Calls will continue through several more miniseries. Surely a story with such scope and duration may never have happened if we waited for Mike to draw them all.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When Hellboy and Mignola collide, you expect certain things BUT those expectations are forced to become fewer and fewer as time travels on. First there was the "no Nazi" touch because Mignola started tiring of the feel, then there was the "no B.P.R.D." on the swingsets because Hellboy needed to get a little air, then there was the "tales" aspect that went on for a while. Now, Hellboy is back in a bigger role and he is bigger than life but he has one little problem - the person drawing the beloved Anung Un Rama is not Mignola. That certainly took a little time to adjust to.

As far as storylines go, this one is a great piece of literature and feels like a prequel to something larger. You can see it in the way specific things happen and in the omens that sometimes show their heads and sometimes find themselves spoken of. There are also a lot of familiar faces gathered around to put the tale together, giving people a prospective on what exactly happens when a lot of "somethings" get together. I personally liked the touch of all of it: the storyline carries its own weight, Hellboy has to put in work to figure out what is happening and what role he is playing, and there is a bigger thing than Hellboy working within the context. A reader has to pay attention to the story to make sure they catch everything that is going on as well - the good thing about that is that it is Mignola at his finest, not simply making Hellboy to make Hellboy but to put some love into his finest creation. That is a good thing to see because Mignola himself said that he had fallen out of love with Hellboy and was planning a break for a while (he never said how long that while would be, either, and that frightened a lot of people) before this came out.
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