Help My Brother

February 22, 2011 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Also available in CD Format
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2:48
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3:28
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4:15
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3:26
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2:46
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3:14
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3:25
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2:24
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3:27
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4:24
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11
3:27
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4:39


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: February 22, 2011
  • Label: Compass Records
  • Total Length: 41:43
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004LTZKA6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #27,960 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 16 customer reviews
It's because of the Gibson Brothers that I like Blue Grass.
Sunshine
If you are reading this, yet haven't seen these guys perform or heard them on CD, this is a good starting point.
William E. Adams
I was very pleased with the music on this album, and am sure if you like this type of music, you would love it.
Alan H. Londerville

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By James P. Bourey on March 3, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Last month I started a review of the great new album "Help My Brother" from The Gibson Brothers. This band is as good as it gets in bluegrass. In fact when it comes to making music that can be appreciated, understood and enjoyed these guys cross the boundaries of genre. The original review was a song by song kind of thing. But today I was listening once again to the album and I decided that I was taking the wrong approach. Besides, Eric Gibson can do a much better job on the track by track insights.

So I thought about this album. Then I thought about how this album fits into the body of work that the brothers have produced and recorded. I thought about how their work fits into the greater body of bluegrass, country music and so called Americana music. That's a lot of thinking, I know, but I've drawn some impressions now that I feel, in my humble poetic heart, should be shared.

One of the finest gifts we have received from the Creator, as humans, is the ability to make music. And the extra blessing that we've gotten is the fine folks that make music really, really well. There are all kinds of musicians making all kinds of music. Our tastes are not all the same but most people, when they hear a talented musician doing his or her job in a special way, react very positively. If I hear a fine classical orchestra I feel the power of that art. If I hear an excellent steel drum band the result can be the same. And so it goes. When I hear the new album from The Gibson Brothers I know I'm hearing a real gift, one that is part of the original from the Big Giver.

In my life I've dabbled in music. On a couple of occasions I was able to play well enough with some other musicians so that I felt the special joy that comes from the experience.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By William E. Adams on February 22, 2011
Format: Audio CD
My wife and I bought this CD on Feb. 12, ten days before its official release, at a concert by the Gibson Brothers for the nationwide "Live on Stage" venue (the old "Community Concerts" organization that specialized in bringing professional music to small and medium communities via advance season ticket sales.) I had heard an earlier release of theirs, "Ring the Bells" but was only mildly impressed. I thought their pickin' was great, vocals less so. However, seeing them perform live with their three instrumental partners made me realize just how good Eric and Leigh Gibson really are. And the new disc seems to have stronger vocals, even better playing, and an overall stronger song selection than "Ring the Bells." I have been only a casual fan of Bluegrass over the past 50 years, buying, in all those decades, only perhaps a half-dozen LP's, tapes or CD's that fit the style. The Gibson Brothers could easily have created a show that paid tribute to the great bluegrass stylists of the past 50 years, and to traditional country, mountain and Gospel tunes that sound good with bluegrass instruments and harmonies. Surely, however, that would bore these fine performers. They write new songs, and do some of the classics in their distinctive arrangements, and thus gave the Midland Texas audience a very fine show. And in "Help My Brother" they have put a high-quality album on the market. If you are reading this, yet haven't seen these guys perform or heard them on CD, this is a good starting point.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By John Saroyan on September 10, 2011
Format: MP3 Music
The Gibson Brothers keep besting themselves by following principles I imagine they used playing baseball: throwing strikes, playing a tough infield, getting on base, advancing the runner, and never letting up.

The title track on their latest album, Help my Brother, springs forth with the optimism and hope that The Open Road did on their 2003 release, Bona Fide. Joe Walsh brings the same lustrous mandolin tone to the band that Marc MacGlashan did in the early oughts. The bass run Leigh lays down in Waking West to Memphis is perfect for the prodigal narrator looking to mend his ways. At the end of the last verse Mike Barber walks the line with him.

Dixie's imagery of an Elvis the world never knew is riveting. Frozen in Time must appeal to all us "dinosaurs," purchasing CD's and pining for covers of Louvin Brothers' and Jim and Jesse McReynolds' songs. Both Eric and Leigh's melodies have the easy likeability of pop music, but instead of becoming tiresome after multiple listens, my brain only wants more. He Can Be Found adds another spectacular song from the Louvins' catalogue to the Gibsons'.

As he should, Eric kicks off Joe Newberry's uplifting Singing as We Rise, with a Stanley-inspired banjo introduction. Pitched in the key of B, the song reminds me of Somebody Touched Me. Multiple nods to Dr. Ralph bands of the early 1970's include the arrangement of voices in the chorus, Barber's propelling and uninterrupted line of fifths, Clayton's channeling of old-time bluegrass fiddler Curly Ray Cline and inclusion of former Stanley pupil, now icon, Ricky Skaggs.

Want vs. Need sounds as if Leigh is using a combination of flatpick and fingerpicking to great effect, as he does on the Mountain Song from Long Way Back Home.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Choirboy on June 13, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Best Album yet for the Gibson Brothers.. They just keep developing and evolving. I can't find a song on this album that is not worthy of top rating status. Best harmony in Bluegrass or any music for that matter.
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