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The Life of Henry Brulard (New York Review Books Classics) Paperback – December 31, 2001


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Product Details

  • Series: New York Review Books Classics
  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: NYRB Classics (December 31, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0940322897
  • ISBN-13: 978-0940322899
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.1 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,032,666 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Unfinished autobiography by Stendhal, which he began writing in November 1835 and abandoned in March 1836. The scribbled manuscript, including the author's sketches and diagrams, was deciphered and published as Vie de Henry Brulard in 1890, 48 years after its author's death. The work is a masterpiece of ironic self-searching and self-creation, in which the memories of childhood are closely interwoven with the liberating joy of writing. -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: French

More About the Author

Marie-Henri Beyle (23 January 1783 - 23 March 1842), better known by his pen name Stendhal, was a 19th-century French writer. Known for his acute analysis of his characters' psychology, he is considered one of the earliest and foremost practitioners of realism, as is evident in the novels Le Rouge et le Noir (The Red and the Black, 1830) and La Chartreuse de Parme (The Charterhouse of Parma, 1839).

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By John on July 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
Who would think that an unfinished autobiography could be so good? But despite its rough edges and the odd passage of interest only to the author, the Life of Henry Brulard is very good indeed, and as moving as The Red and the Black. Early in the Life, Stendhal describes the pleasure of reading Florentine goldsmith Benvenuto Cellini's memoirs, so fresh, he notes, that they seem to have been written yesterday. The same could be said for Stendhal's own autobiography.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A. Lowry on August 4, 2003
Format: Paperback
I didn't look forward to trying this book---memoirs of childhood seldom do much for me---but there being so little Stendhal out there in translation, I couldn't overlook it. Well, long book tho it is, H.B. is very readable and a lot of fun for those who love Stendhal's style and persona. Chatty, honest, quirky (all those little maps!), skipping around madly, with the strange mix of irony and idealism that makes Stendhal so "modern," this is an enjoyable book for "the happy few." I doubt there are many books like it---Rousseau's confessions feel much more polished, & hence less "real," than Stendhal's book does. (Of course I'm agnostic on how honest S. really is---but it's a good book, true or not!)
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By Avid reader on September 12, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
On page 305 of this long and remarkably non-traditional autobiography, Stendhal addresses his readers with this characteristically frank admission: "At bottom, dear reader, I don't know what I am: kind, unkind, clever, stupid. What I know beyond question are the things that give me pain or pleasure, that I wish for or that I hate." What gives him pleasure he explains on the same page in the following charming way: "A salon of eight or ten people where all the women have had lovers, where the conversation is light-hearted, anecdotal, and where a light punch is drunk at half past midnight." -- This is the man. His autobiography describes how he became this man, describing his growing up as 16-year-long rebellion against the oppressive circumstances of his family, the over-protective tutelage of a bigoted and hateful aunt and a distant, cold father. Even as a ten-year old boy, Stendhal managed to attach his personal rebellion to the contemporaneous events in France (the call to freedom by the Revolution and the heroics of Napoleon's campaigns). This retelling of a childhood is very consciously undertaken by the man of 52. What this retrospective proves to its author is that he continues to be the man that he became during those formative, rebellious years: He still champions the same likes and dislikes (on the one hand nobility and clarity of thought, wit, love of the arts, passionate love of women, on the other hand hatred of hypocrisy, philistinism, bigotry, money grubbing, and political maneuvering). -- This is a long book, beautifully translated and intelligently introduced by John Sturrock. At times the story does show some longueurs.Read more ›
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1 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Herman K. Sarkisian on February 13, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I heard of this book when I watched the movie "Fahrenheidt 451. I had to get it to read for myself
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