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Her Gates Will Never Be Shut: Hope, Hell, and the New Jerusalem Paperback – January 1, 2010


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Her Gates Will Never Be Shut: Hope, Hell, and the New Jerusalem + The Evangelical Universalist: Second Edition + Patristic Universalism: An Alternative to the Traditional View of Divine Judgment
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 234 pages
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub (January 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1606088823
  • ISBN-13: 978-1606088821
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #377,773 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Brad Jersak is an author and teacher based in Abbotsford, BC, where he attends Fresh Wind Christian Fellowship. His heart is to share the good news that God is Love and that God's love was shown to us perfectly in Jesus of Nazareth. Through his books and seminars, Brad teaches that anyone can learn to hear God's voice through the simple practice of "listening prayer." Those who begin to listen will find out that God's love will heal wounded hearts and empower them to heal this broken world.

Brad's foundational book, "Can You Hear Me? Tuning in to the God who speaks" trains readers in the ways of "Listening Prayer." This book provides biblical teaching and 33 practical exercises for tuning in to God's voice.

Customer Reviews

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Perhaps the Lake of Fire is a purifying fire and perhaps God's mercy and love does endure forever.
DeDona
This book is both solidly founded in scholastic research and written in an engaging fashion; this dichotomy can be hard to find.
Undergrad Scot
The author concedes that the biblical data can be seen to teach the traditional view, as well as the annihilationist position.
Maverick

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Maverick on December 4, 2012
Format: Paperback
I'm amazed that this book by Bradley Jersak hasn't received more attention. The author writes engagingly, with well-crafted arguments from the relevant biblical texts, good humour, as well as personal humility. On top of all that, the book has an aesthetically pleasing cover design (not always the case with Christian books)!

Bradley Jersak sets forth his case for a non-dogmatic, hopeful universalism with remarkable *BIBLICAL* insight. Make no mistake, this isn't the kind of wishy-washy sentimentalism that overlooks the seriousness of sin, holiness of God, and Jesus being the only way to God. Along with recent works by Thomas Talbot and Robin Parry/Gregory MacDonald, this book will surely enable the universalist position to be a legitimate biblical option among evangelicals - alongside the traditional view (eternal conscious torment) and the annihilationist position (conditional immortality). It's important to note that the author doesn't deny the reality of hell, just the nature, purpose and duration of it; and he does so non-dogmatically. This last point cannot be emphasized enough. The author concedes that the biblical data can be seen to teach the traditional view, as well as the annihilationist position. But what are we to do with the other verses?

I was both challenged and encouraged to read about the fact that God promised in Ezekiel 16:53 that he "will restore the fortunes of Sodom" (future tense), and yet Jude 7 informs us that Sodom serves "as an example of those who suffer the punishment of eternal fire". How are we to reconcile these two passages? By sticking to our traditions and minimizing the importance of the Ezekiel passage? Or by re-examining our traditions?
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By DeDona on May 17, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the most thoughtful and well researched challenge to eternal punishment that I have read. The author is not a rigid universalist. But he does take his own advice "not to stand over the scriptures as we read them, but to stand under them". If you do this you will find that a dogmatic position in either direction is very difficult to stand on.

The great New Testament scholar William Barclay says "the truth of God should be penetrated deeper and deeper in our passing generations". "All things are possible with God", does today's church really believe this. Bradley Jersak proves that early church fathers such as Origen and Gregory of Nyssa believed it. They believed that God would eventually redeem all mankind through redemptive punishment and correction. Augustine's eternal torment doctrine was a direct rebuttal to the theology of total restoration. In light of Augustine's own dramatic born-again experience he felt that men would not seek true redemption if they would eventually be restored anyway.

One negative I find in such works that are trying to presume what God will do with each and every person is the breeding of spiritual pride and arrogance. Men like John Calvin were so sure of their theological position that they would resort to murder to fend of heresies. The truth is that no man knows for sure. At the end of the sermon on the mount Jesus warned that not everyone who calls him lord will enter in, but he who actually does what He says. That should be humbling for every professed believer.

The author does an in depth analysis of Revelation 21 and 22 showing that even after the elect enter into the New Jerusalem and sinners are cast into the Lake of Fire, there are still sinners standing outside the city after the fact.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Lydia L. Johnson on September 19, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read several books on hell, and this book maintains, by far, the most well-rounded perspective. I'd suggest it to anyone looking into the issue and genuinely seeking knowledge and truth on how we are to view what the scripture has to say about each idea currently circulated.
I loved it and I highly suggest it!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Undergrad Scot on November 29, 2013
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I first heard about Bradley Jersak through the documentary "Hellbound" (which I certainly recommend). What struck me about Jersak was his calming presence in the interviews that were shown of him and his grand knowledge of Gehenna and the history behind the Valley of Hinnom.

My context: I come from an fairly conservative evangelical background in which I had little to no interest in a theology that allowed room for ultimate redemption or universalism. I remember when the book "Love Wins" by Rob Bell came out, just about every evangelical Christian was stirred up and many books were published in opposition to its message. I read "Erasing Hell" by Francis Chan when it came out a few years ago and was fairly satisfied with the information provided and continued on in my belief in eternal conscious torment. I am currently a Christian Scripture undergrad major.

Now, the book. This is perhaps one of the best books I have read this year. Being a topic of interest for myself (and anyone who is reading this review) I dove headfirst to see what information Jersak would provide. He did not disappoint. He goes in-depth on each word translated as Hell in English translated Bibles, moves into the historical framework of the Valley of Hinnom, looks at the beliefs surrounding Jesus during his lifetime, and moves into responsible exposition of Revelation 21-22. Also, a plus for some people (including myself), is that it is not written in exquisite scholarly language. He writes from the heart and with great rhetoric. This book is both solidly founded in scholastic research and written in an engaging fashion; this dichotomy can be hard to find.
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