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Her Own Medicine: A Woman's Journey from Student to Doctor Mass Market Paperback


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Fawcett; 1 edition (October 5, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0449003094
  • ISBN-13: 978-0449003091
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,328,072 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

Sayantani DasGupta, a young Indian American woman, entered medical school with a vision of saving lives and making the world a better place. What she found instead was a difficult path of politics, sexism, and red tape. Based on wry "field notes" she took throughout her journey in the healing profession, this enlightening story of learning to be a doctor will provoke tears, laughter, and thoughtful reflection. . . .

In these pages, DasGupta's trials and tribulations--and those of her patients--are vividly rendered. Whether it is a fourteen-year-old giving birth, a terrified AIDS patient, or elderly lovebirds with a less-than-ordinary sex problem, DasGupta illuminates the miracle of life and the struggle to sustain it. Yet she also shines a penetrating light on today's medical landscape--the militarism of medicine (where the patient is often the enemy), the gender wars, and the increasingly restrictive practice of managed care.

A remarkable account of medicine on the cusp of the twenty-first century, HER OWN MEDICINE is filled with wisdom and written with grace, lucid intellect, and a striking respect for life and the profession that heals it.

About the Author

Sayantani DasGupta graduated from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1998 and is currently in training in the Residency Program in Social Pediatrics at Montefiore Hospital (Albert Einstein College of Medicine) in the Bronx. She has written for popular magazines, medical journals and literary/academic anthologies, and has been featured with her mother in Ms. magazine and two photography/essay books on mothers and daughters. She lives in New York City with her husband.

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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 18, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Dr. Dasgupta puts her heart in the book to tell a story that is simultaneously funny, sad, and continuously provocative. While writing an autobiography, she reveals the politics of modern medical teaching, racism, and feminism. Her natural writing style makes you feel like she's sitting next to you telling the story - you won't put the book down till she's done!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Emmawasabi on February 18, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read this book about 2 years ago. I was at a crossroads both in a personal relationship and my medical career. It was refreshing to read that another woman in a ethnic minority had faced similar experiences and that the perception of the medical profession being comparable to that of the military profession was basically the same as mine.
I admit that it is not exactly as precise on the subject of the journey through medical school and the patient work per se, but it was still a fun read and I would recommend it to people who want to read up on a different perspective of their chosen medical path...
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By A Customer on January 18, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I wanted to get an in-depth view of a medical student's world. What I got, however, was a sketch of that world. Sayantani DasGupta has a lot of ground to cover and I realize that-- but she skims over way too much. We get brief glimpses of her feelings/thoughts at different stages of her schooling, glimpses of various patients, but we get nothing in depth and this is frustrating. She kept telling us how difficult it is to be a woman, to be in med school, but I wanted to see more examples of this rather than simply be told this over and over again. She clearly has strong feelings about what's wrong with medical schools and the medical community, but that is another book entirely. I wanted to hear more about her experiences and feel like I got the short end of the stick.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Abhijit Ghosh on November 30, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I always judge a book to see how much of the story I remember after putting it down. In her style of writing, I found myself laughing and appreciating her perspective on the medical community and patients. Written in an easy going style, she leads the readers through visual descriptions of the events occurring around her. I would have liked to have seen more dialogue to better gain an insight into the author. Very easy to read.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By happypup on September 10, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am considering a career in medicine and bought this book as I hoped it would give me a different perspective on medicine - that of a woman and a member of an ethnic minority. The book is actually a collection of essays on Dr DasGupta's view of the medical community. Note it is not a book about her experiences - you will not find too much detail of patients or training. Instead Dr DasGupta puts forth at great length how she views the medical community as similar to the military, how sexist it is, and how she doesn't really want to be a part of it. Patient stories are dealt with superficially and only when they provide passing support for her arguments. The essays that make the chapters were all written at different times and so do not form a logically progressive argument even. The book is dry, political and not very insightful. The main argument (medicine=military institution) is repeated over and over. If you want a feminist treatise then buy this book(I count myself as a feminist - but that was NOT what I was looking for with this book). If you want any insight into medicine, don't buy it - instead buy Perri Klass, Melvin Konner, Robert Marion or Lisa Belkin...all MUCH better books for those interested in medicine (and Konners also deals more maturely with the problems of medicine)
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