Herd and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Herd: How to Change Mass ... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Very Clean. The cover shows some wear. The dust jacket has a small tear. Interior is clean and crisp. Great Binding.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Herd: How to Change Mass Behaviour by Harnessing Our True Nature Hardcover – March 12, 2007

10 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$39.95
$9.95 $0.79

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$39.95 FREE Shipping. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Editorial Reviews

Review

"Earls has a beguiling and an irrepressible intellectual curiosity, so the book becomes a very enjoyable and allusive compendium…” (The Guardian, March 2007)

"Bold in its conception and engaging in execution, offers the most radical new theory of consumer behaviour in a generation" (Gulf Business, March 2007)

"…brain-stretching stuff, looking at economic patterns, investment history and behavioural psychology to help the reader become a shrewder investigator." (Securities and Investment Review, March 2007)

"It will change the way you think about marketing.  It will also change the way you think about yourself."  (Marketing Direct, November 2007) 

From the Back Cover

Can you explain the explosion of social phenomena like text messaging when there has been little or no promotion of the behaviour? How a Mexican wave happens? The emergence of online communities? Or – more sensitively – the steady rise of floral roadside tributes to traffic accident victims?

Unless you have a good explanation of mass behaviour, you won’t have much chance of altering it. This is why so many government initiatives struggle to create real change, why so much marketing money fails to drive sales, why most M&A programmes reduce shareholder value and most internal change projects don’t deliver lasting transformation.

Herd explains the ‘why’ of our struggles to influence mass behaviour. It reveals that most of us in the West have misunderstood the mechanics (the ‘how’) of mass behaviour because we have misplaced notions of what it means to be human. Mark Earls uses a diverse range of different sources, anecdotes and evidence - from Peter Kay and urinal etiquette to international rugby and rise of the Arctic Monkeys - to show that we are at heart a ‘we-species’, but one suffering from the ‘illusion of I’.

In doing so, Earls challenges some of our deepest ideas to reveal the truth about who we are and what marketers, managers and governments can do to set about influencing mass-behaviour. Bold in its conception and engaging in its execution, Herd offers the most radical new theory of consumer behaviour in a generation.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (March 12, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470060360
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470060360
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,177,228 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Adrian Ho on May 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Recently, books like The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell or the Influentials by Jon Berry and Ed Keller, have captured the imagination of marketers and the public alike. It's easy to see why. They propose a tidy and believable model of influence.

1.) There are some people who are more influential.

2.) If we can just reach them, we can influence large numbers of people.

Accepted as gospel, these two ideas have spawned entirely new industries and companies devoted towards creating "viral marketing."

Happily for all of us, things just don't work that way. Brand spanking new research from P&G and Duncan Watts is serving as confirmation of Mark's thesis: it is our innate nature as "herd" animals that causes mass movements, not the influence of a handful of individuals.

This simple little insight overturns much of what we currently think about and how we approach marketing. If you're serious about creating real movements in the new marketing landscape you simply have to read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Gareth Kay on July 2, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've just finished reading Herd. Actually, I devoured it in two sittings. And I urge you to go and read it if you want to think about how to better trigger changes in mass behaviour.
Unlike most business or marketing books it's not a set of case studies or a 'how to' process guide to mechanistic thinking.
Rather, it's an excellently written analysis of the new thinking (and the forgotten old thinking) about how people think, act and behave. It doesn't give you answers or tell you what to do, but rather raises questions in your mind about the principles on which most communications thinking is built.
Already, it's made me question a lot of the assumptions I have been taking for granted, made me think differently about some of the problems I'm trying to solve and helped me ground some of the different thinking I've been doing over the last couple of years.
Whether you agree with all the conclusions or not, we need more stuff like this that brings fresh, challenging, provocative thinking into the far too conservative world of marketing and communications.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By V. Holmes on February 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I really enjoyed this book. Mark Earls combines a light, at times playful style of writing with good ideas and a refreshingly well researched investigation. In this way, Herd is as Russell Davies suggests, a pleasant change from the many marketing books that are little more than "very long business cards".

Earls investigates market behavior from the position that we humans are first and foremost social beings. He does this by drawing on a wide range of well referenced resources stemming from ethology, biology, anthropology, marketing studies and so on.

On the background of this data Earls suggests that if marketers want to be truly effective they will need to start thinking about how people naturally influence one another. This rather than how marketers have tended to think that they are able to exert influence over those they narrowly think of as consumers. He proposes that this implies a shift from direct relationship marketing (where the lines of communication exist between company and customer) to citizen to citizen marketing (where the company creates opportunities for people to interact with one another). You need only consider the popularity of social media like myspace and facebook to realize why this approach makes sense.

In addition, Earls' work provides a good counter position to the current buzz around neuromarketing, which claims to be able to understand more about consumer behavior by examining individual brains. As Earls suggests, while this is all good and well - it may miss the point by neglecting to consider the influence of others on our behavior.

Thoroughly enjoyable!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By The Dutch Beholder on October 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Yes, we all like reading something that gives us 'inside' information. Uhhhhhmmmmm...indeed.... info that makes us feel a little bit more suffisticated and maybe even a little better than other people around us (don't feel bad about this). PopSci books about behavioural-science, -marketing and -finance etc give us such a feeling. And this feeling sells books, something that people Malcolm Gladwell and Nassim Taleb and alikes know all to well. And that's okay as long as we still learn something from the book. However, reading about the Milligram expirement for the 1000's time did not make me happy or thought me anything. Reading about social conformation etc for the 1500's time did not either. Without going into detail I would advise people to look for a summary of this book on the net. Safe your self a few extra bucks and precious time(or Euro's in my case). Summary is worth the time and the money in my view so I rate this book with 3 stars. For newbees I would advise to first read Robert Caldini (I sure as **** know Mark Earl did so too).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Herd" is a significant book for anyone in the marketing profession. Although I am glad that I did not read it when it first came out, instead having gotten caught up in other human behavior concepts like "Buyology" and other how the brain works reading, it was the book that validate my new thinking...we are not as unique as we are being told we are!. I remember being enthralled by the idea that we could/should dissect human behavior down to a 1:1 level. Along with anyone who has worked in the CRM world, you have come to realize that the execution on such a level is impossible, if for no other reason then the fact that your corporate infrastructure is not set up to care about people that much. Herd provides an excellent orientation to getting marketing folks back to capturing the true essence of human behavior and providing a better foundation from which to build effective customer services. A foundation that is more readily executable, therefore making relationships more attainable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Herd: How to Change Mass Behaviour by Harnessing Our True Nature
This item: Herd: How to Change Mass Behaviour by Harnessing Our True Nature
Price: $39.95
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com