Here and Now: Letters 2008-2011 and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$18.62
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.95
  • Save: $9.33 (33%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 18? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Here and Now: Letters (2008-2011) Hardcover


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$18.62
$3.30 $3.29 $16.50

Frequently Bought Together

Here and Now: Letters (2008-2011) + Winter Journal + Report from the Interior
Price for all three: $48.19

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Viking Adult; First Edition edition (March 7, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780670026661
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670026661
  • ASIN: 0670026662
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #223,460 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“[A] civilized discourse between two cultivated and sophisticated men…A pleasure to be in their company.”—Michael Dirda, The Washington Post.

“These two famous writers might seem at first an unlikely pairing…[but] as a series of collaborative inquiries and an extended meditation on the processes of friendship, the book has something substantive to offer.”—The New York Times Book Review

"Here and Now is akin to eavesdropping on a dazzling, extended dinner conversation between two intelligent and substantive minds... A very appealing, human portrait of these two writers."—Bookpage 

“A genial, often riveting exchange. Amiable and revealing missives from two remarkable minds.”—Kirkus Reviews

“What keeps us reading is not the brilliance of the minds – though that feature is generously on offer as well – but the warmth, unpretentiousness, and honesty that emerges from these pages…An invigorating and deeply engaging look at two literary greats, as we’ve never seen them before.”—thestar.com

“A striking portrait of two great friends…the result of Auster and Coetzee’s exchange is nothing short of witty, sharp and thought-provoking, and offers a fascinating look into the minds of two of the 20th century’s greatest writers.”—Malibu Magazine

About the Author

Paul Auster is the bestselling author of The New York Trilogy and many other critically acclaimed novels. He was awarded the Prince of Asturias Prize in 2006. His work has been translated into more than forty languages. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

J. M. Coetzee is the author of twenty books, which have been translated into many languages. He is the first author to be awarded the Booker Prize twice: first for Life & Times of Michael K and then for Disgrace. In 2003 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. A native of South Africa, he now lives in Australia.



More About the Author

Paul Auster is the bestselling author of Travels in the Scriptorium, The Brooklyn Follies, and Oracle Night. I Thought My Father Was God, the NPR National Story Project anthology, which he edited, was also a national bestseller. His work has been translated into thirty languages. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Customer Reviews

It's the kind of book I will pick up and read again.
Lee Hill
An interesting aspect is the way how the nations have their evolution, and the literature is the mirror of those facts, if it is able to understand the modern trends.
Edoardo Angeloni
Definitely suited for Auster/Coetzee fans because the letters offer new insights to two men who are some of the greatest literary minds alive today.
D. Crowell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By William Kennedy on March 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love the novels of Don DeLillo, Philip Roth, Thomas Pynchon, and Denis Johnson. They are all incredibly intelligent and gifted writers. But I get the most excited whenever a new Paul Auster book comes out. There's something about his voice, like an uncle who lives abroad. Someone you don't get to see as often as you'd like. He's got a million strange and funny stories. All unique, all true. And for some reason it only seems right that those things would happen to him. Your strange and funny uncle who smoke too many cigars and drinks a little too much wine.

That Auster and Coetzee corresponded so consistently through the years is remarkable. That they did so using a typewriter and a fax machine is telling of the importance these two men place on letters, both figuratively and literally.

Of course, I was drawn more to the Auster portions of this book, but it was interesting to see the ways in which conversation topics were introduced and carried on by both sides. It was Coetzee's suggestion that they write each other, and you can tell he has immense respect for Auster.

Coetzee's South African heritage makes for some unique perspective on culture, politics, and relationships. Sometimes you can almost sense Auster is analyzing his friend to be used as a character in a novel.

Over all, this is an insightful read if you're fan of either writer, otherwise it remains a curiosity in the bibliography of one of America's most gifted and interesting writers.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kate Parrick on September 23, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My lukewarm response to this series of letters between two literary giants, Auster and Coetzee, may reflect more on my expectations and assumptions about such a book. I was bitterly disappointed, especially in the self-aggrandising contribution made by Coetzee.

As a fan of both writers, I fear my expectations drew on some projected beliefs about the whole being more than the sum of the parts. The author of Disgrace and Elizabeth Costello has much in common with the mind that conceived Leviathan. I anticipated an intense, intellectual exchange about the challenge of devising and structuring such ideas-driven fiction. I thought I’d find insights, Paris Review style, into the writing process, or at the very least, honest self-revelation about the demons that attend the novelist, and the means by which they might be banished. Advocates of the ‘literary biography as voyeurism’ school will curl their lips here; Coetzee and Auster surely may write to each other about any damn thing they please. Indeed. But why seek publication? The exercise smacks of vanity, or worse, avarice. Or extreme narcissism (that is, even more than one needs to be a novelist, which is considerable). I am not unsympathetic to the fiscal imperative all writers confront, but even allowing for the narcissism which must necessarily accompany literary talents of such proportions as these, it seems an error of judgement has occurred. It may be a salutary lesson, to seek the novelist only in the novels.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By L. Young VINE VOICE on April 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I have always found the lives of writers fascinating so I jumped at the chance to see the letters exchanged between two eminent writers of the 21st century. Unfortunately I didn't find much of interest here. Clearly these two men have a warm friendship. As to be expected the writing of each is first rate. The topics discussed were lackluster. There was a lot of chat about sports, not very interesting to me. There was also a good deal of chatting about politics which demonstrated a level of naivete that I found astounding in two such intelligent men. You will find nothing here about the works in progress of both authors and little about other authors work. There is no literary gossip either.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rob Brennan on August 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover
It's easy to put good writers on pedestals, and regard them as a somewhat higher forms of life. This book reminds us that they're pretty much like the rest of us, except that they give a good deal of time to thinking about how the world -- and the people in it -- work. Lots of interesting observations and insights into all sorts of things. I found Coetzee's comments about the US's Second Amendment (in his letter of Nov 29, 2010) very relevant to today. An enjoyable book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Toni Rubio on December 20, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Every one of Austers books is total pleasure. This one has the marvelous plus of correspondence between two extraordinary minds, in such a natural, every day way. Beautiful!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Reading the correspondence between two individuals in history has always been a guilty pleasure for this writer. When beginning the exchange, are they aware that their letters will be published, thus the writing is not only for the letter writer but also, consciously, for the public at large? This is a cynical question or maybe a wise one, considering today's "bottom line" economy and publishers overall. The notion of "Art for Art's sake"; that 19th century aesthetic sensibility or Romantic sensibility is long gone, even if had ever existed at all. That now said, there is honesty in these letters that really, after many years pass, throughout Auster's & Coetzee's correspondence, their true friendship rings authentic.

Both writers admired each other's work despite coming from diverse cultures. Auster, a dyed in the wool New Yorker and Coetzee, a born South African, having experienced the horrors of Apartheid first hand to then live in Australia, and of all places, Adelaide, more a town than a city compared to Melbourne or Sydney. Both men, however, are life- long globe trotters, giving them a more than parochial view of the world.

Considering both touch upon major topics from sports to the Middle-East debacle, both manage as well to veer off to minor topics like the derivation of a particular phrase or word.

Only a three year exchange of thoughts and simple habits as writers, for me, uncannily, they had become such good friends in such a short time, as if they had been writing each other for a life time!
Quite extraordinary because in no-way is this exchange of ideas a literary artifice to fool the reader.

These letters, particular close to the end, reveals the blooming of a true friendship, and this is what makes this text unique and a worthwhile read

.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa6426ce4)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?