Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.95
  • Save: $2.79 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by -usedbooks123-
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good Some wear on book from reading, we guarantee all purchases
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Heresies Hardcover – May 30, 1998


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, May 30, 1998
$25.16
$14.99 $14.89
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Best%20Books%20of%202014
--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.


Frequently Bought Together

Heresies + The Witch Hunts: A History of the Witch Persecutions in Europe and North America + Heresy and Authority in Medieval Europe (The Middle Ages Series)
Price for all three: $73.25

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 486 pages
  • Publisher: Hendrickson Pub (May 30, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565638670
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565638679
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.7 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,656,667 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Harold O.J. Brown, (1933-2007), received his PhD at Harvard University and was professor of biblical and systematic theology at Trinity Evangelical International University and author of several books. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
7
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 19 customer reviews
You won't have to be a history nut to understand Brown's book.
E. Johnson
For most, if not all, modern heresies are revivals of or share assumptions with heresies of the first four and one half centuries of Christianity.
John M. Davidson
The text is very well written and easy to follow, even for a laymen; however, theological nomenclature is a stretch for me.
BigHat57

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 40 people found the following review helpful By John M. Davidson on March 24, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is the second printing of this particular title. It was originally published in 1984 under the title Heresies : The Image of Christ in the Mirror of Heresy and Orthodoxy from the Apostles to the Present. There was a very good review by Joseph Sobran in the October 5, 1984 issue of "National Review" which led me to purchase the original book. Please see my specific remarks for the edition under that title.

Dr. Brown is currently with the Reformed Theological Seminary Resident Faculty, in Charlotte NC. Heresies is a comprehensive history book as well as a copious treatise of various heresies since the first century A.D. This would explain its renaming for the current editions.

"Heresies" are defined by Dr. Brown as those beliefs that are so at odds with orthodox Christian theology that they are a direct threat to the basic beliefs necessary for adequately understanding God's plan for personal salvation. They are more than differences of opinion, and the heretic must have some claim on calling himself Christian, some real original relationship to orthodoxy or the "FAITH ONCE REVEALED". A non-believer cannot be a heretic. He can only be a non-believer. In this sense some "heresies" are not truly heretical but another religion.

Dr. Brown explains that all theological concepts subject to heretical interpretation are found in the Bible. These are primarily those on the Trinity and those on the nature of Jesus, as well as other subjects that became the basis for some heresies. The earliest Christians generally understood these concepts. However, until heretical beliefs started materializing and needed formal refuting these truths were not systematized and comprehensively presented in an understandable way.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jedidiah Palosaari VINE VOICE on April 9, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I felt like I walked through the valley of Christian history, and on every side of me lay dragons and lions of dissent, seeking to devour Truth and replace it with the viscera and bones of deception. Brown presents Christian history as the dialectic of orthodoxy, heresy, and the response to heresy. Without heresy, the Church would not be what we know today. For we defined ourselves by what became heretical. There would be no need to state the precise nature of the Trinity (or as precise as is possible) if there had not been those who denied it's existence. There would be no need to say that Jesus is one person, in two natures, one divine and one human, if some had not claimed that Jesus was only divine, or two persons. There would be no need to dwell on the grace of Christ's soteriology, if some had not believed that we were essentially good, and just needed to be reminded of the truth through Christ's example.
For those who would claim, as some do these days, that heresy was orthodoxy, and orthodoxy only the most powerful of the parties who wrote the histories, Brown convincingly shows how what we understand orthodoxy to be today is what has always been believed, from the earliest times, and the earliest sources. It is not however simple to uncover this truth, or simply that what we believe now must be what was first believed- this Brown also makes clear.
Perhaps one of his most interesting insights is how the Roman Church left the path it was on, in reformatting it's doctrine of transubstantiation, making it more exact than it needed to be. In so doing, they removed the personal efficaciousness of soteriology.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 30 people found the following review helpful By E. Johnson on December 16, 2000
Format: Hardcover
You won't have to be a history nut to understand Brown's book. This is by far the best book I have ever read on the origin of false teachings. It shouldn't be a surprise, but the many heresies come straight from the 2nd-5th centuries. In effect, there is nothing new under the sun. This is why we need to know our history, because so many people end up repeating the early errors. Brown is especially effective in his sections on the Trinity and Arianism. It is fascinating to see the details that Brown is able to report. Finally, I am sad to see that the current publisher has let Heresies go out of print so soon after its 1998 reprinting. Trust me, the book is worth having, even if you need to find it used. It is worthy having as a reference, and if you are like me, you will need a highlighter to keep you company as you read it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By zonaras on May 11, 2004
Format: Hardcover
_Heresies: Heresy and Orthodoxy in the History of the Church_ by Harold O. J. Brown is an extensive overview of the numerous doctrinal disputes within Christendom from the early Church to the present. Brown writes from the perspective of a conservative Lutheran, which determines the somewhat narrow point of view in some parts of this study. However, the good in this book far outweighs its negativity. Part of the problem when writing about heresy and heresies is the difficulty when defining exactly who the "heretics" are, what doctrines and dogmas are acceptable and which ones are unacceptable and to be categorized as "heretical." Many ultramontane Catholics will consider the entire Protestant Reformation heretical, while conservative, and fundamentalist/evangelical Protestants of various denominations view the central tenants of Catholicism (Mariology, Papal infallibility, literal transubstantiation of the Eucharist, etc). Also, where does Eastern Orthodox Christendom fit in?
The key difference between the ancient heretics and theological liberals of today, notes Brown, is the ancients sincerely believed what they espoused as Christian truth while today's skeptics are wishy-washy nay-sayers. Brown begins by noting the Greek/Hellenistic and Roman/Latin influence in the theological teachings of early Christianity. Many disputes, the most fundamental being the nature of God, the Trinity and the Person of Christ, were outside the material covered in the canonical biblical writings. Instead, theologians used Greek philosophical concepts and complicated language to explain Christian doctrinal concepts as they developed over time. This tendency (beginning with St.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?