Qty:1
  • List Price: $45.00
  • Save: $14.98 (33%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 19 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex-Library. Text is clean and unmarked. Includes library markings in back cover.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $4.89
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Herman Melville : Pierre, Israel Potter, The Piazza Tales, The Confidence-Man, Tales, Billy Budd (Library of America) Hardcover – April 1, 1985


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$30.02
$22.00 $9.87
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Herman Melville : Pierre, Israel Potter, The Piazza Tales, The Confidence-Man, Tales, Billy Budd (Library of America) + Herman Melville : Redburn, White-Jacket, Moby-Dick (Library of America) + Herman Melville : Typee, Omoo, Mardi (Library of America)
Price for all three: $89.03

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Library of America (Book 24)
  • Hardcover: 1478 pages
  • Publisher: Library of America (April 1, 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0940450240
  • ISBN-13: 978-0940450240
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 1.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #215,682 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Should find a place on every civilized person's bookshelf. -- Los Angeles Times

About the Author

Herman Melville was born in August 1, 1819, in New York City, the son of a merchant. Only twelve when his father died bankrupt, young Herman tried work as a bank clerk, as a cabin-boy on a trip to Liverpool, and as an elementary schoolteacher, before shipping in January 1841 on the whaler Acushnet, bound for the Pacific. Deserting ship the following year in the Marquesas, he made his way to Tahiti and Honolulu, returning as ordinary seaman on the frigate United States to Boston, where he was discharged in October 1844. Books based on these adventures won him immediate success. By 1850 he was married, had acquired a farm near Pittsfield, Massachussetts (where he was the impetuous friend and neighbor of Nathaniel Hawthorne), and was hard at work on his masterpiece Moby-Dick.

Literary success soon faded; his complexity increasingly alienated readers. After a visit to the Holy Land in January 1857, he turned from writing prose fiction to poetry. In 1863, during the Civil War, he moved back to New York City, where from 1866-1885 he was a deputy inspector in the Custom House, and where, in 1891, he died. A draft of a final prose work, Billy Budd, Sailor, was left unfinished and uncollated, packed tidily away by his widow, where it remained until its rediscovery and publication in 1924.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By K. K. Woofter on May 12, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Darkly humorous, cynical, horrific and melancholy, Melville's later works are the capstone to the author's deepening discontent with his America. The vision here can be frustrating: Melville conjures up the most painful, soul-searching mysteries, and then refuses to knot them up with tidy solutions. Instead, Melville deepens the moral ambiguity that seeped through the skin of the transitional Moby Dick in full-length works like Pierre and Billy Budd, Sailor. And the shorter works--among them The Piazza Tales, Benito Cereno, and Bartleby the Scrivener--are imbued with such a longing for any kind of graspable meaning, that their readers, like their characters, find themselves in a ponderous state of shock. The human condition, Melville seems to say, is one of isolation, cast adrift, searching alone for a truth that is, and always will be, inscrutable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By pdj733 on April 8, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Nothing I can write can either do justice to this collection or convince you to read it. Those goals are simply out of my persuasive power.

All I can say is that Melville is one of those rare writers who works in the aggregate. He does not hit the nostalgia button like Twain, or compose a jaw-dropping sentence every other paragraph like Dickens. However, after reading much of Melville, a quality of reflection and thought is induced that is equally as valuable, if not superior, to some of his more immediately gratifying contemporaries.

The LA Times stated that this collection "Should find a place on every civilized person's bookshelf." They were spot on.

Combining this collection with Moby-Dick will make you more well-read, it will give you a greater depth to your literary knowledge, but more importantly, it will make you a better human being. And that is worth more than any pretty turn of phrase.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Kimberly Wells on March 15, 2002
Format: Hardcover
If you think that you can't read classic American Literature because it's all so big and intimidating (i.e., Moby Dick) think again. Some of the short stories in this collection of Melville's "other" work are incredibly well-written insights into human nature. (As is Moby Dick, but I digress).
Billy Budd's encounter with "justice," Bartleby's statement that he would "prefer not", Benito Cerino's exploration of slavery-- these tales are not to be missed. You should read this book as a starter, then move on to the BIG OLD white whale.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By greenhornet on April 2, 2011
Format: Hardcover
By the end of his life, Melville still kept at it, still kept turning out incredible works. Probably no other American writer has suffered from the hands of the critics (maybe Kerouac) like Melville did. "Melville Crazy" comes to mind. To think that the critics preferred Typee and the likes over Clarel and Moby-Dick! Melville was by far America's best novelist, he could be hilarious and extremely sad, quite depressing and poetic like no other novelist could be. The greatest mystery is how could such an incredible writer have been so misunderstood and ignored? It boggles the mind! The Library of America does its writers such a beautiful service and these volumes are certainly worth the extra money. All of the Melville books are great and this final one is outstanding.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sophia Mihic on March 26, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It got to me on time and was just what I needed. Thanks so much . . . . . !
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?