Heroines and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.95
  • Save: $4.35 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by tamarbooks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Paperback in very good condition, with remainder marks.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Heroines (Semiotext(e) / Active Agents) Paperback – October 5, 2012


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.60
$7.93 $7.90


Frequently Bought Together

Heroines (Semiotext(e) / Active Agents) + Green Girl: A Novel (P.S.)
Price for both: $25.57

Buy the selected items together
  • Green Girl: A Novel (P.S.) $11.97

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Series: Semiotext(e) / Active Agents
  • Paperback: 312 pages
  • Publisher: Semiotext(e); First Edition edition (October 5, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1584351144
  • ISBN-13: 978-1584351146
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.8 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #348,713 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A brave, enlightening, and brutally honest historical inquiry that will leave readers with an urgent desire to tell their own stories."  - Bitch magazine

"Heroines reads with an almost physical urgency, as though written in a hot, hot heat, as Zambreno tangles and untangles historic and fictional literary ladies (Emma Bovary, Nicole Diver), all while chronicling her own creative frustration as she trails her husband from one backwater academic post to the next, trying to dig herself out of her own alienated funk. It's totally smart, provocative, and oddly sexy."--Martha Bayne, Chicago Reader

"The book is startlingly insightful." -- Jezebel.com, Books You Should Read

"Issues a powerful clarion call for a supportive community of female writers who will fixate on their own experiences without shame and reject the "measuring rod" of the "Great American (Male) Novelist." -- Publishers Weekly

"I was reading your book intensely for days and people started asking, "Ok ok, what is this book?" What is this book you are so enraptured by? And I said, "Well, it's a book I've been waiting for for a long time." I am very excited it exists." -- Mary Borkowski, The New Inquiry

"It should come as no surprise that her provocative new work, Heroines, published by Semiotext(e)'s Active Agents imprint next month, challenges easy categorization, this time by poetically swerving in and out of memoir, diary, fiction, literary history, criticism, and theory. With equal parts unabashed pathos and exceptional intelligence, Heroines foregrounds female subjectivity to produce an impressive and original work that examines the suppression of various female modernists in relation to Zambreno's own complicated position as a writer and a wife." -- Christopher Higgs, The Paris Review online

"Intensity and intelligence forge the baseline current that runs through and characterizes most of Kate Zambreno's written work." -- The Millions, where Heroines was named one of the "Most Anticipated" Books of 2012.

"If you thought you knew a lot about the 'wives' of modernism and the various forms of silencing they suffered, Kate Zambreno's Heroines will teach you more; if you didn't know much, your mouth will fall open in enraged amazement. Zambreno admirably transforms copious research and personal experience into vernacular knowledge, then heats up the brew into a justified rant about dynamics that may have shape-shifted over the past 100 years but have (sadly) not disappeared. Bravo." -- Maggie Nelson, author of Bluets and The Art of Cruelty

About the Author

Kate Zambreno is the author of two novels, O Fallen Angel and Green Girl (to be reissued by Harper Perennial in June). She is also the author of two books of innovative nonfiction, Heroines and Book of Mutter (forthcoming from Wesleyan University Press in 2015). She teaches in the writing programs at Columbia University, Sarah Lawrence College, and Wesleyan University.

More About the Author

Kate Zambreno is the author of two novels, Green Girl (Harper Perennial) and O Fallen Angel (Chiasmus Press). She is also the author of two books of innovative nonfiction, Heroines (Semiotext(e)'s Active Agents) and Book of Mutter (forthcoming from Wesleyan University Press in October 2015). She teaches in the writing programs at Columbia University and Sarah Lawrence College, and is at work on a novel, Drifts (forthcoming from Harper Perennial).

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Parnassus on Wheels on February 12, 2013
Format: Paperback
Reading Kate Zambreno's essays is a little like reading her blog, FRANCES FARMER IS MY SISTER. The constant literary references can be breath-taking, if a bit distracting. Sometimes she sends me off on bookish rambles, two or three at a time. Sometimes she makes me wish we could have lunch, or at least a long telephone chat. The mind of this woman is vast.

That being said, there is a moment of murkiness on p. 259 when it seems as if either Zambreno or her grad student friend thinks that Charlotte Perkins Gilman wrote THE AWAKENING. I know this can't be true, and prove it to myself by finding at least a dozen references elsewhere in the book to Kate Chopin, but this one flaw bothers me in an otherwise stellar book. Is it an editing issue, and if so, how did it slip past? One of the reasons I love Zambreno's work is that you can see her (and hear her) editing herself, all the time, so I had to wonder what happened. I wouldn't expect her to catch every comma splice on the blog, but a book of essays is more formal, and with only a print edition so far, more written in stone.

Perhaps it's a paltry question to ask about a truly brilliant collection, but I do hope it will be cleared up in the electronic edition, which is surely underway. This is one of those books one wishes to have available on all devices, for moments of waiting in traffic or offices. Something approaching delight or insight is on every page - proof that feminists can be funny as well as cerebral.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Paul Morrow on November 1, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book is brillo, Zambreno a zavant. Read it on trains and cross-town buses. Read it in airports and bundled up in cafes. Stick it on your shelf between Bowles (Jane) and Markson (David). Or else pass it on to someone you esteem. Above all, speak breathlessly about it, rave about it - this book which is certainly some kind of remedy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Looks like we got ourselves a reader.... on July 31, 2013
Format: Paperback
As an Akrnoite and a lover of women writers I was excited to read this book. Good grief. Name drop, tragic female writers, poor me, crap on Akron, name drop, pretentious drivel, poor me, Europe, tragic female writers, crap on Akron, poor me, more drivel.

I don't think my fellow mid-westerners were staring at her cropped hair or leather jacket. That is nothing new around here. I am sure people tried to welcome her. Mid westerners, and Akronites in particular are a very welcoming group. Her personality is what soured her time in Akron. Her pretentious, I'm better than everyone attitude soured her time in Akron. You know what is not to blame? It's not Akron's rundown factories or her neighbor's dog or the people who kindly invited her over for Thanksgiving.

I am furious I wasted my time on this - precious time I'll never get back. Puke. I'm glad they freakin' left.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?