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Hidden on the Mountain: Stories of Children Sheltered from the Nazis in Le Chambon Hardcover – February 1, 2007


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Hidden on the Mountain: Stories of Children Sheltered from the Nazis in Le Chambon + Lest Innocent Blood Be Shed: The Story of the Village of Le Chambon and How Goodness Happened There
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 830L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 275 pages
  • Publisher: Holiday House; First Edition edition (February 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0823419282
  • ISBN-13: 978-0823419289
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 7.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #207,359 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 6-10–Through extensive research and visits to New York, Florida, Virginia, Switzerland, and France, DeSaix and Ruelle uncovered the amazing story of the thousands of children who were sheltered in the tiny mountainous French village of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon during the Holocaust. The first chapters provide readers with an introduction to World War II, the Vichy government, and the region in southern France of La Montange Protestante. Subsequent chapters contain first-person accounts by individuals who, as children, were hidden on the mountain, along with black-and-white photographs and an epilogue detailing their lives after the war. Profiles of local residents who were instrumental in rescuing, sheltering, hiding, and helping refugees escape to Switzerland are included as third-person accounts. The authors interweave useful information about the French Resistance and the various aid organizations that were committed to helping Jewish refugee children. While they explain their rationale for switching between the first- and third-person narrations, the fluidness of the text is ruined in the process, making it seem choppy and uneven. Regardless, the book is an invaluable resource for Holocaust educators, and many of the children's narratives would read beautifully out loud. It would also be a wonderful companion to the movie Weapons of the Spirit. Readers of novels such as Carol Matas's Greater Than Angels (S & S, 1998) and Connie Colker Steiner's Shoes for Amelie (Lobster, 2005) who are interested in learning more about the courageous and heroic deeds of these villagers will find Hidden on the Mountain fascinating and inspiring.–Rachel Kamin, Temple Israel Libraries & Media Center, West Bloomfield, MI
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

In this inspiring photo-essay, the authors tell an amazing rescue story about a Nazi occupied Protestant community in south-central France that pulled together to save several thousand Jewish children from the Holocaust. Kathy Kacer's Hiding Edith (2006) tells a similar story from the viewpoint of one child. More detailed, this account is based on extensive research and interviews with 30 survivors and rescuers, who recall in diary-style entries how it was. Many readers will focus on the dramatic overviews and commentaries, but the personal details, accompanied by black-and-white photos, are unforgettable, too: living with fear; waiting for a letter ("Why haven't Mama and Pap sent for me?"); escaping to Switzerland. The research is a big part of the book, and the authors have provided extensive documentation as well as time lines, maps, bibliographies, and source notes that can help researchers find out more. Readers slightly younger and older than the target audience will find this compelling, too. Pair it with Carol Matas' novelization of the story, Greater than Angels (1998). Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A. Becker on March 31, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I just chanced upon this remarkable book: Hidden on the Mountain by Deborah Durland DeSaix and Karen Gray Ruelle: Stories of Children Sheltered from the Nazis in Le Chambon. The authors spent four years finding and interviewing people, who as children and youth were protected during WWII by this community. They have then masterfully proceeded to tell their stories.

Le Chambon is a mountainous region of France inhabited by Huguenot Christians. These people, many poor farmers, opened their homes and supported three children's homes for children needing safe haven during WWII. Many of these children were Jews. They are credited with saving at least 3,500 Jews as well as about 1,500 other refugees.

In addition to the memories of the children and youth, the book includes a detailed time line of events of the war; numerous pictures of the children, people, and places mentioned in the book; a glossary; index; maps; and informative chapters about the war, the region, and its people.

This book was written for children and is exactly what I am looking for to share with my children, ages 10 and 13, as we study WWII.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By M. Tanenbaum VINE VOICE on December 16, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The authors tell the amazing story of Le Chambon and the surrounding villages, whose inhabitants saved over 3,500 Jews from the Nazis, either by sheltering them in their own communities or by helping them escape to Switzerland. The authors concentrate on the stories of about a dozen Jewish child survivors whom the authors were able to personally interview. They also interviewed non-Jewish townspeople and other refugees who were sheltered at Le Chambon during the war. The book is illustrated with many photos of survivors and rescuers and has an extensive index, glossary, bibliography, maps, timelines, and a pronunciation guide. This book is a must for public and school libraries, and tells a little known story of group heroism in the Holocaust.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Max K. Liebmann on March 21, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This book is geared for preteens and reflects absolutely accurately the interviewees' stories. We can attest to it, because we were there and are written up in the book. To this day, the people of Le Chambon do not understand why they are going down in history because "they only did what was right". This book is definitely worth reading.

Hanne & Max Liebmann
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Format: Hardcover
This non-fiction book is a unique collection of real-life accounts from individuals who as children were sheltered during the Nazi era in the mountains of Southern France in a town called Le Chambon. This work is quite admirable, as individuals interviewed recall their experiences in journal form. The stories attest to the heartbreak and the realistic dangers of the times, but provide an added sense of hope and an appreciation for those who rose up against evil. Each entry is followed with an epilogue that gives the reader the satisfaction of knowing what has become of each child. The stories are not without pain and great loss, but what shines through is the righteousness of the citizens of La Chambon. The Jewish children who were sent to La Chambon, a Protestant community, were separated from their parents. In the face of trauma, the children were warmly welcomed into their new community. The children attended school, worked on farms, and participated in activities with other children. The uniqueness of La Chambon was in the sense of duty the entire community had in protecting the Jewish children. Many of the individuals discuss their Judaism, including the struggle to make sense of their religious identity. The "Note to Readers" in the beginning of the book, clearly details the research process and the care taken by the authors to share these stories with authenticity. The authors' passion for the project is felt throughout the book. For ages 11- 16.
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