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Hiding in Hip Hop: On the Down Low in the Entertainment Industry--from Music to Hollywood Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Atria Books; 1st Atria Books Hardcover Ed edition (May 13, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416553398
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416553397
  • Product Dimensions: 1.1 x 6.4 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #129,682 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A fascinating peek inside hip-hop's last taboo." -- Newsweek

"Dean's descriptive, page-turning exposé about his closeted same-sex romances with Hollywood and Hip-Hop's leading Black men will be a rude awakening for many and healing for others." -- Essence --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Review

"A fascinating peek inside hip-hop's last taboo." -- Newsweek

"Dean's descriptive, page-turning exposé about his closeted same-sex romances with Hollywood and Hip-Hop's leading Black men will be a rude awakening for many and healing for others." -- Essence --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Speaker, Educator, Author, and Hip Hop Head Terrance Dean is the author of the explosive and provocative memoir, Hiding In Hip Hop'On the Down Low in the Entertainment Industry from Music to Hollywood (Simon & Schuster/Atria Books June 2008).

Dean has worked in the entertainment industry for over 10 years with heavy hitters such as Spike Lee, Rob Reiner, Keenan Ivory Wayans, and Anjelica Houston. He has worked with television and film production companies; MTV Networks, B.E.T., Savoy Television, Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros. Pictures, and Sony Pictures.

Dean is the founder/creator of Men's Empowerment, Inc. and co-creator of The Gathering of Men with Adeyemi Bandele. Adeyemi is the husband and spiritual partner of acclaimed teacher and best-selling author Iyanla Vanzant. Dean is the author of the best-selling book for men of color, 'Reclaim Your Power! A 30-Day Guide to Hope, Healing and Inspiration for Men of Color,' (Random House/Villard May 2003).

Deans' New York based organization, Men's Empowerment, has been in existence for over five years and has over 300 men of color from various backgrounds involved with the organization.

Men's Empowerment is an organization that is dedicated to the transformation of men of color in their communities for their own self-empowerment. The not-for-profit organization is a hugely popular empowerment group, which allows men of color to communicate, share and participate in an environment where brothers can 'check their egos at the door' and create bonding relationships with one another. The brothers share experiences in their lives, which helps build a foundation of support for men to freely be in a room exchanging information to make powerful transformations in their lives. Some of the featured guest speakers have included, Emil Wilbekin, former Editor-in-Chief, VIBE Magazine; Kevin Powell, Author and Activist; Stacy Spikes, CEO Urbanworld Film Group; Gordon Chambers, Grammy Award Song Writer; Omar Tyree, Author; and Kevin Lyles, Chairman of Warner Music Group.

Dean's first best-selling book, 'Reclaim Your Power!' assists men with daily reminders of meaningful spiritual meditations that can be practiced anywhere and at anytime. This book provides simple reminders of being still and listening to your inner voice, remembering to breathe and having faith in the midst of the storm. This powerful compact book also provides worksheets, which allows the reader to become interactive with the process of nurturing their spirit. This book definitely leaves the reader feeling empowered!

Dean is a 2005 John Seigenthaler Journalism Fellow from Vanderbilt University. He is a contributing writer to the anthologies, 'Souls of My Brothers' and 'Always Too Soon.' He has also appeared across the country on popular syndicated radio shows and has made television appearances on NBC 10 Philadelphia, WB 11 New York, and FOX 2 in Detroit. Dean has written for The New York Sun, The Tennessean, Fatherhood Today, The Michigan Chronicle's Front Page, Flirtingtime.com and Blackmeninamerica.com.



Customer Reviews

If he wasn't going to name them why write the book.
R.D.
This book was repetitive and I'm glad I went to the library and borrow it and didn't waste my money.
Alice
The author was very discreet in his encounters and this book was more like a life story.
Mario Estell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By D. Frazier VINE VOICE on June 18, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Hiding in Hip Hop: Confessions of a Down Low Brother in the Entertainment Industry by Terrance Dean is an intimate account of the author's experience as an undercover brother. As a child, Dean was forced to cope with issues surrounding drugs, abandonment, AIDS, and molestation. As an adult, those issues still plagued him, but he was able to add sexuality to his list of problems. His fulfillment in having sex with other men would not have been so huge had he not been a part of the entertainment business. But because he was flooded with images of masculinity and saw how the rich and famous treated those who were openly gay, he contrived an artificial existence as a heterosexual man ultimately hiding in Hip Hop.

Dean was not the typical down-low guy though. In actuality, he loathed the way some down-low men lied to their women. He also was not too keen on playing second fiddle to men who wanted to have their cake and eat it too. Dean wanted much more. He wanted real love. And he wanted to know how he could attain that love and still be accepted in a business that was all about images and facades. Through his desires to love freely, dealing with his estranged family, and attempting to find a way to overcome his conflict with his sexual preference, Dean started Men's Empowerment where he invited his peers to discuss the stressors that came with celebrity and/or power. Men's Empowerment became a seed flourishing into other groups that helped communities in New York and ultimately helped Dean do some serious soul searching.

Hiding is Hip Hop was a decent read. It garnered so much attention that by the time I read it, I was so intrigued by the celebrities Dean was not naming and almost missed the point of his book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By E. Montgomery on May 10, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Like most people, I went into this book more excited about celebrity dirt. As you'll quickly discover, this is a book about a man's life, a true memoir. Yes, there's a little bit of sex here and there, and some celebrity references, but at the end of the day, this is a memoir about a man's search for identity and salvation.

Terrance Dean receives an A+ for his brutally honest portrait of his real life insecurities, confusion and loneliness, making this book so worth reading. So much more than which celebrities are doing what, this book really brings to light the fight or flight mentality so many black gay men endure every day in every part of this country, just to survive.

How I wish this book had existed 20 years ago.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Tom Markus on May 11, 2008
Format: Hardcover
An incredibly accurate portrayal of the industry. Those who make a living in hip hop know that it may only be surpassed by the closeted gay men in the entertainment industry of the Black churches. The book is truly an eye-opener to those who thought their "macho ganstas" were all that.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Dominique W TOP 1000 REVIEWER on May 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am glad Terrance Dean didn't name names. At first I thought that it was a ploy to sell books or for legal reasons. Once reading I realize that if he would have named names then he would have been a sell-out. It would have been out of character for someone in his situation.

The book detailed the struggles of a bisexual African American man working in a highly publicized industry. I was shocked at most of what I read about the "down low brothers" but not entirely surprised considering the nature of the book.

The riddles are not entirely easy to figure out. I think I immediately knew who one of the people, Ella (I think that was her psuedo-name), was. Otherwise I think the descriptions hides the identities of the people involved very well. And really...I DON'T want to know who everyone is. T.M.I. for sure.

This book was a fast read. Not something I would reread but definitely sheds some light on a sensitive situation.
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23 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Jenae Richards on May 4, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Yes, yes, yes, I know. This is supposed to be a serious book about a gay man's struggle to accept his sexuality, and love himself for who he is.

And it is that.

But I'm not going to lie, I bought it to find out which ones of these so-called gangsta hip hop stars is really homo. Be honest! Isn't that why you want to read it?

There are a few names mentioned in the book, but it's mostly descriptions of the stars -- so thinly veiled you can guess who the author is talking about. I'm not a real for real hip-hop fan, but even I was able to guess four or five. And let me say (are you ready for this?), if I'm guessing correctly, one of the people mentioned played a large part in Karrin Steffans' book, Confessions of a Video Vixen!

Can you believe it?

I do!

I'm not going to spoil it by posting my guesses, because 90 percent of the enjoyment of the book is figuring it out for yourselves. But another rapper mentioned is tatooed, and always rags on homos in his raps. Yep, yep, yep!

I heard that the author is supposed to be on the Wendy Williams show on May 13th, and I can't wait!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By So. Calif book reader on September 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Whew!! Just finished the book. I loved it and hated it--just like Terrance felt about the gay or down-low life. On one page he can't wait to get his hands on a guy, and on the next page he's self loathing in agony. One moment he's praising God and attending church, and on the next page he's drinking and doing drugs like there's no tomorrow. In one chapter he can't stand his mother and resents her, and then when she dies he's devastated. I couldn't keep up with him. An emotional roller coaster, if such was even the case. I think this book was written to be dramatical. I've never read about a guy that would supposedly get sick to his stomach when going into a gay bar--but then half an hour later was taking the best looking guy in the place home with him. Fortunately, he FINALLY in the last pages comes to terms with his homosexuality, admits it, and goes happily into the sunset.

He also makes it seem like the music industry and in particular the hip hop world is FULL of down-low men, which could be true, I do not know. There seems to be a lot of stepping over the sexual boundaries these days. I don't see how he got any work done, but I also don't see how all these supposed down-low guys were able to stay so down-low if they were always going to parties. Wouldn't somebody talk or spill the beans somewhere along the way?? I think he told it all the way he wanted to tell it. Which is more than anyone else has done---so I really did like the book. It excited me with all his conquests, just wished it had been a little bit meatier. But then they all wouldn't be down-low. And with all that sex, he never once mentioned getting a STD which you know HAD to have happened. Terrance never did say whether he enjoyed it all, but I think he did. His will power was pretty non existant, bless his heart.
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