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High Noon

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Editorial Reviews

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One of the greatest Westerns ever made gets the deluxe treatment on this superior disc from Republic Home Video's Silver Screen Classics line of special-edition DVDs. Written by Carl Foreman (who was later blacklisted during the anticommunist hearings of the '50s) and superbly directed by Fred Zinnemann, this 1952 classic stars Gary Cooper as just-married lawman Will Kane, who is about to retire as a small-town sheriff and begin a new life with his bride (Grace Kelly) when he learns that gunslinger Frank Miller (Ian MacDonald) is due to arrive at high noon to settle an old score. Kane seeks assistance from deputies and townsfolk, but soon realizes he'll have to stand alone in his showdown with Miller and his henchmen. Innovative for its time, the suspenseful story unfolds in approximate real time (from 10:40 a.m. to high noon in an 84-minute film), and many interpreted Foreman's drama as an allegorical reflection of apathy and passive acceptance of Senator Joseph McCarthy's anticommunist campaign. Political underpinnings aside, this remains a milestone of its genre (often referred to as the first "adult" Western), and Cooper is flawless in his Oscar-winning role. The first-rate DVD gives this landmark film all the respect it deserves, beginning with a digitally remastered transfer from the original film negative. Additional features include the exclusive documentary The Making of High Noon, hosted by film historian Leonard Maltin and featuring interviews with the late Lloyd Bridges (who played Cooper's rival ex-deputy), director Fred Zinnemann, and producer Stanley Kramer. Also included is the original theatrical trailer and a special chapter stop highlighting the Oscar-winning song "Do Not Forsake Me." Offered in English and dubbed French and Spanish, with English closed-captioning or Spanish and French subtitles. --Jeff Shannon

Additional Features

One of the greatest Westerns ever made gets the deluxe treatment on this superior disc from Republic Home Video's Silver Screen Classics line of special-edition DVDs. The first-rate DVD gives this landmark film all the respect it deserves, beginning with a digitally remastered transfer from the original film negative. Additional features include the exclusive documentary The Making of High Noon, hosted by film historian Leonard Maltin and featuring interviews with the late Lloyd Bridges (who played Cooper's rival ex-deputy), director Fred Zinnemann, and producer Stanley Kramer. Also included is the original theatrical trailer and a special chapter stop highlighting the Oscar-winning song "Do Not Forsake Me." Offered in English and dubbed French and Spanish, with English closed-captioning or Spanish and French subtitles. --Jeff Shannon


Special Features

  • "The Making of High Noon", a documentary hosted by Leonard Maltin including interviews with Lloyd Bridges, director Fred Zinnemann and producer Stanley Kramer
  • Production stills

Product Details

  • Actors: Gary Cooper, Grace Kelly, Thomas Mitchell, Lloyd Bridges, Katy Jurado
  • Directors: Fred Zinnemann
  • Writers: Carl Foreman, John W. Cunningham
  • Producers: Carl Foreman, Stanley Kramer
  • Format: Black & White, Closed-captioned, THX, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), Spanish (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Republic Pictures
  • DVD Release Date: July 1, 1998
  • Run Time: 85 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (451 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 0782009972
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #54,778 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "High Noon" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

107 of 115 people found the following review helpful By Sanpete on March 30, 2008
Format: DVD
Lionsgate has announced a new DVD release of High Noon with new special features. There is what appears to be a reliable report, though unconfirmed, that it will include a new transfer of the film, restored by Paramount. The current and older DVDs are only of average video and audio quality.

This a true classic, combining traditional Western themes with contemporary concerns about popular acquiescence to evil, done in a gripping, unusual (nearly real-time) way, with great actors.

Town marshal Will Kane (Gary Cooper) is caught between his new pacifist Quaker wife Amy (Grace Kelly) and a felt duty to face down evil men coming on the noon train to take revenge on him (and presumably cause whatever other trouble they please). Most of the drama takes place in the lead-up to a climactic battle, as the townspeople choose whether to support Kane with action or to let him stand alone. Amy too must choose between her spouse and her own moral beliefs. The tension builds relentlessly as we see clocks ticking towards noon. The innovative black and white cinematography emphasizes the dramatic points, while the internal drama is captured in Cooper's face.
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76 of 82 people found the following review helpful By "flickjunkie" on November 5, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
"High Noon" is frequently mentioned among the best Westerns and even among the best films ever made. It is rated #33 by the American Film Institute on their top 100 of the 20th century. It was nominated for seven Academy Awards and won four, including best actor for Gary Cooper, best song and best editing. But, was it really that good? After all, it was a bare bones black and white Western in an age of Technicolor spectaculars.
It was that good and more. "High Noon" was not really a Western as the genre had been defined to that point. It was more of a character study of the human condition. It just happened to be set in the American West. Westerns at that time were action films with white hats and black hats. There were fistfights and gunfights throughout the entire film. They clearly differentiated good guys, on the side of justice and righteousness, from bad guys who spurned laws and sneered at those who obeyed them. The heroes were always noble and fearless, typified by actors like John Wayne and Roy Rogers. Moreover, the good guys always stuck together, despite all odds, to prevail against the outlaws.
"High Noon" was the complete antithesis of this formula. Kane is a flawed hero who is proud to a fault. Although it is clear who the villain is, we never see him until the last ten minutes of the film. The story is not about good and evil in the larger sense. Instead, it is about conviction and integrity on a personal level. Kane is portrayed as stubbornly putting his own feelings above the safety of the town. He stands against everyone, willing to sacrifice his marriage, his friendships, his good name and his life for his honor and self-respect. The biggest departure from the formula was his unabashed manifestations of fear.
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Frederick Baptist on April 27, 2008
Format: DVD
This movie is more than 56 years old and yet it is still relevant and enjoyable today as it undoubtedly was back in those days. This is because the themes are recurring and just as it was then, it is still the same now with regards human nature. The parable of the Good Samaritan covers it and so does this wonderful classic film about the sins of omission being just as bad as sins of commission. Is it okay to let a man go to his death because it is none of your business or is it just as good as if you had pulled the trigger yourself? Here, Gary Cooper plays a very capable marshall who has managed to selflessly keep his town safe but when it comes to the marshall himself needing some help, the townspeople make up excuses to avoid putting themselves in danger when the marshall himself had been doing this on their behalf for years. How often do we commit sins of omission ourselves by making excuses to not do the right thing? This sad and sorry aspect of human nature was present in the parable of the good samaritan, this film and will probably continue to exist today and ever after.

Cooper's performance is brilliant and he thoroughly deserved his Oscar for this film. People confuse courage with having no fear which is a mistake. Courage is doing the right thing especially when you are afraid and to do so the more afraid that you are, the more courageous you are. To have no fear ever is not courage but insanity. I especially love the part when Cooper admits to Bridges that he was afraid and yet continued to do the right thing. There are lots of lessons here that we can all learn that are timeless and for this reason, this film will continue to be a classic and relevant for ages to come.
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Thank you, Lionsgate, for this DVD! But please put it out on Blu-Ray!
Please give us a Blu-Ray version. I wait in anticipation of stunning black and white photography and a great film all presented on my high def television the way it was seen by me in theaters in 1952.
Dec 24, 2011 by Anthony F. Runfalo |  See all 3 posts
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