High Stakes: Florida Seminole Gaming and Sovereignty and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading High Stakes: Florida Seminole Gaming and Sovereignty on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

High Stakes: Florida Seminole Gaming and Sovereignty [Paperback]

Jessica Cattelino
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)

List Price: $24.95
Price: $15.29 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $9.66 (39%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 15 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Tuesday, July 15? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $13.99  
Hardcover $67.16  
Paperback $15.29  

Book Description

August 4, 2008 0822342278 978-0822342274
In 1979, Florida Seminoles opened the first tribally operated high-stakes bingo hall in North America. At the time, their annual budget stood at less than $2 million. By 2006, net income from gaming had surpassed $600 million. This dramatic shift from poverty to relative economic security has created tangible benefits for tribal citizens, including employment, universal health insurance, and social services. Renewed political self-governance and economic strength have reversed decades of U.S. settler-state control. At the same time, gaming has brought new dilemmas to reservation communities and triggered outside accusations that Seminoles are sacrificing their culture by embracing capitalism. In High Stakes, Jessica R. Cattelino tells the story of Seminoles’ complex efforts to maintain politically and culturally distinct values in a time of new prosperity.

Cattelino presents a vivid ethnographic account of the history and consequences of Seminole gaming. Drawing on research conducted with tribal permission, she describes casino operations, chronicles the everyday life and history of the Seminole Tribe, and shares the insights of individual Seminoles. At the same time, she unravels the complex connections among cultural difference, economic power, and political rights. Through analyses of Seminole housing, museum and language programs, legal disputes, and everyday activities, she shows how Seminoles use gaming revenue to enact their sovereignty. They do so in part, she argues, through relations of interdependency with others. High Stakes compels rethinking of the conditions of indigeneity, the power of money, and the meaning of sovereignty.


Frequently Bought Together

High Stakes: Florida Seminole Gaming and Sovereignty + Blood Politics: Race, Culture, and Identity in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma + The Huron-Wendat Feast of the Dead: Indian-European Encounters in Early North America (Witness to History)
Price for all three: $61.34

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

High Stakes is a work of great ethnographic and theoretical power, written in prose of great clarity. It is also a model of sensitive and thoughtful writing with respect to American Indians, who have long been rightly suspicious of the ethnographic gaze and ethnographic representation. High Stakes shows what ethnography can, indeed must, be and do in the twenty-first century.”—Sherry B. Ortner, author of Anthropology and Social Theory: Culture, Power, and the Acting Subject


High Stakes tracks to the core of contemporary North American settler society today—the economy of value that structures expectation and possibility for indigenous peoples and the state. Here Jessica R. Cattelino examines with great ethnographic care and rigor the expectation that Indians be poor even where they have wealth, that wealth portends a diminishment of culture, and that indigeneity then stand before this process in an unrelenting and unchanging way. With a nuanced, careful, and precise ethnographic eye to and with the Seminole Tribe of Florida, this very important book proves so much otherwise.”—Audra Simpson, Columbia University

From the Publisher

"High Stakes is a work of great ethnographic and theoretical power, written in prose of great clarity. It is also a model of sensitive and thoughtful writing with respect to American Indians, who have long been rightly suspicious of the ethnographic gaze and ethnographic representation. High Stakes shows what ethnography can, indeed must, be and do in the twenty-first century."--Sherry B. Ortner, author of Anthropology and Social Theory: Culture, Power, and the Acting Subject

"High Stakes tracks to the core of contemporary North American settler society today--the economy of value that structures expectation and possibility for indigenous peoples and the state. Here Jessica R. Cattelino examines with great ethnographic care and rigor the expectation that Indians be poor even where they have wealth, that wealth portends a diminishment of culture, and that indigeneity then stand before this process in an unrelenting and unchanging way. With a nuanced, careful, and precise ethnographic eye to and with the Seminole Tribe of Florida, this very important book proves so much otherwise."--Audra Simpson, Columbia University


Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books (August 4, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822342278
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822342274
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #746,816 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
(6)
4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Ethnography! November 11, 2010
Format:Paperback
I recently assigned this book for my Anthropology of Tourism class. This book is well-written, compelling, and theoretically sophisticated. Cattelino focuses not on the gambling industry itself, but rather on the changes this new economy has brought to the Seminole people. Looking at diverse questions of economic wealth, cultural representations, changing housing forms, and the history of Seminole interactions with U.S. federal programs, she paints an even-handed and sympathetic portrait of a group that has lived through multiple moments of change, of which gaming is only the latest. She challenges dominant U.S. narratives that equate Native American culture with poverty and assume that wealth is inherently linked to cultural loss.

I would highly recommend this book for class use, as well as for the general reader who is interested in Native American societies, Native American gaming/casinos, or the Seminole in particular.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Indian Realities January 2, 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I learned more about the Seminoles than I learned about gaming. The author pictured
the Seminole culture to accomplish her goal of showing how gaming impacted that culture.
The picture was clear and enlightening given that I do not know much about how American
Indians actually live today. To me, it was well worth my time.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars This is among my favorite reads. December 31, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I appreciate Cattelino’s emphasis on the "fungibility of money" because it allows us to better explore how money is used as a tool for accomplishing certain objectives. I think this is important in understanding how some indigenous communities use non-indigenous tools today in developing and maintaining their communities. She shows how economic self-sufficiency helps with exercising political power.

Cattelino provides a range of experiences, comments, instances, etc., where “rich Indian racism” is witnessed. This includes television shows and random comments in other settings. Cattelino also relates an argument made by a San Diego State University Professor (see Location 1787) that is also relevant to the policy making concerns expressed by others who have written about Indian gaming.

Another part of me wonders in amazement about the Seminole Tribe’s ability and willingness to develop their community’s wealth. I enjoyed this book and confident others will as well.

In talking with friends who have read this book, I know it has changed peoples' perspectives on Indigenous gaming. They previously thought it was a horrible idea, but changed their minds after reading this book. For others, they thought the book missed analyzing certain other, yet important, issues like "settler logics."
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category