Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Hiking Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (Regional Hiking Series) Paperback – March 1, 2002


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.30 $3.67

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Series: Regional Hiking Series
  • Paperback: 296 pages
  • Publisher: FalconGuides; 1st edition (March 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0762711221
  • ISBN-13: 978-0762711222
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 6.1 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,015,402 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Lace up your boots and sample some of the finest trails in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, situated in California's rugged Sierra Nevada. From towering groves of giant sequoia trees and crystalline trout rivers through the jagged peaks and alpine meadows all the way up to Mount Whitney, the highest mountain in the lower 48, Sequoia and Kings Canyon have routes to please hikers of every stripe. Let veteran hiker and nature lover Laurel Scheidt lead you through eighty-six trails that vary in difficulty from easy strolls for the whole family to challenging treks for the more experienced hiker.Use this guide for up-to-date trail information, accurate directions to popular as well as less-traveled trails, difficulty ratings for each hike, detailed trail maps, and zero-impact camping tips. Whether you are a day-tripper or long-distance hiker, old hand or novice, you'll find trails suited to every ability and interest throughout Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park. (6 X 9, 296 pages, b&w photos, maps, graphs, charts)

About the Author

Laurel Scheidt is a veteran hiker and the author of Best Easy Day Hikes Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. She lives in Modesto, California.

Customer Reviews

Well worth the money and the only hiking guide I will carry when I visit this area again.
New Dawn
Trail selection and details are very good and the trail maps and elevation profiles are extraordinary.
Stanford Gibson
I have read this book from cover to cover and found it to be very thorough and informative.
Ray W. Justus

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Laurel Scheidt on March 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
I am the author of the book above. I would suggest to anyone who has read Candace Scott's review below to take a look at the guide for themselves before letting her have influence over their decision.
I put a lot of hard work into this guide, and the truth is that editors have the final say as to the wording and content of the book. Limits are also put on the length of the book according to how large the publisher's budget is. If you are on contract, such as I was, the publisher expects you to follow their format; listing mileages, keeping non-hiking information to a minimum, limiting each hike to 1,200 words, etc. There were a few hikes I wasn't able to include due to the 90,000 word limit.
Candace mentions that there are topo maps in the guide, which is incorrect. There are trail maps along with elevation graphs (which show the elevation gain and loss). Topo maps are listed for each hike if the hiker should want to purchase them. Hazards are mentioned in the "Make it a Safe Trip" section of the book. Drinking water is mentioned there as well and in Appendix C, "Hiker's Checklist".
Everyone has a right to their own opinion. If she didn't care for the Falcon Guide format, or enjoyed some of the areas more than is reflected in this guide, that's fine and I have no problem with that. I have my own opinions also, and may not have been as enthused in some of the areas due to deteriorating trail conditions (mainly because of horse travel on the same trail). And finally, constantly reiterating the beauty of Sequoia and Kings Canyon can become redundant and tend to lose its effect. Sometimes it is best to experience the scenery in person, and we all know the Sierra Nevada is a beautiful Mountain Range to say the least.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Stanford Gibson on September 19, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent guide to a fantastic and underrated backcountry resource (or short day hikes/tourist trails if you prefer). Trail selection and details are very good and the trail maps and elevation profiles are extraordinary. Unlike most guides there is no hesitation to repeat a map a couple of pages apart if it will be helpful to the reader. The primary drawback of the book is that it lacks big picture planning tools like a map that puts the different sections of the book in perspective. A downloaded trail map from the national park service web site supplements it nicely. Additionally there seems to be more detailed coverage of Sequoia than King's canyon. Overall, however, it was a very helpful guide in planning a fantastic backcountry experience.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By New Dawn on December 3, 2005
Format: Paperback
Just spent a week in Kings Canyon-Sequoia. Took some wonderful hikes and would have been lost without this guide. Its true that the author does not wax poetic about the wonders along each trail but she tells you enough so you can make the decision about whether to take the hike or not. All the technical details and instructions where perfect for the hikes I took. Well worth the money and the only hiking guide I will carry when I visit this area again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By William B. Secrest on March 30, 2003
Format: Paperback
I was impressed by the generous fund of information in this book, and even more so when the author explained that she was operating under space and style constraints. If you look at the publishing record, there are many guidebooks that take in all or part of this region (contrary to what Candace Scott states in her review), and the maps and descriptive material in this volume outshine the vast bulk of its competition. This is an essential volume for anyone interested in exploring the mid-Sierra range and, just as the author says, those interested in poetical aspects over practical know-how are always able to consult John Muir, Clarence King and Ansel Adams.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A. Olszanski on August 7, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't like giving bad reviews. In fact, I hate it. However, I'm indebted to give an honest appraisal of this book and explain why my wife and I agreed on a one-star rating. I've read the mostly glowing reviews from others and based my purchase of this book on them. One reviewer however, Candace Scott, gave only two stars. I now agree with her that the descriptions of each trail are flat and uninformative. The author makes some comments that space is limited and certain information is required -- both credible arguments. However, each hike has overly repetitive information. For example, each trail used by horses is prefaced by a rather lengthy section on horse etiquette. In my opinion, repetition like this can be written once in the beginning and referred to if needed. Other similar examples abound. The most glaring problem with this book it the repetition of the trials. For example, hike # 16 through 22 all begin using the same trail, each one being lengthened a bit to another destination -- leading to highly repetitive information and the unfortunate perception that you can go on essentially 7 different hikes. Clearly, this can be condensed. Lastly, there is little information of why you should go on a hike. What are you going to see? What is special about the destination? What special features of the widely varied terrain can you expect? I read this book cover-to-cover, hoping to get some useful information out of it. However, once in Sequoia, my wife and I found ourselves hiking a number of truly outstanding trails not referenced to in the book, and we went on a beautiful semi-loop backpacking trip over two passes and through some of the most interesting geographical terrain I've ever experienced in one area.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search