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Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith Paperback – January 7, 1990


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 100 pages
  • Publisher: George Ronald Publisher Ltd (January 7, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0853982996
  • ISBN-13: 978-0853982999
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 5.4 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,093,354 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By DAVID-LEONARD WILLIS on January 31, 2004
Format: Paperback
All religions have as their foundation stone the Golden Rule which in Christianity is expressed as "Do unto others as you would have others do unto you". In Hinduism the Golden Rule is expressed as: "This is the sum of duty: do naught to others that which if done to thee would cause pain" while the Bahai Faith expresses it as: "Blessed is he who preferreth his brother before himself." If we are to prevent religious rivalry progressing to religious war it is important that we learn about other religions and try to identify and emphasize our common heritage rather than highlight our differences. While "Hinduism and the Bahai Faith" has been written as an introduction to the Bahai Faith to those of the Hindu tradition, it is helpful for those of other religions who wish to gain an insight into both religions and who may, perhaps, seek to identify areas of similarity with their own religion.
Hinduism is not merely a religion, it is a collection of religious traditions that have evolved to represent a wide variety of views about most matters while the pivotal points of the Bahai Faith are the belief in a progressive, recurring divine revelation and the unity of all religions. The Qur'an tells us that God sent messengers to all peoples and that He made known His will and His truth through Noah, Abraham, Moses, Krishna, Buddha, Zoroaster, Christ, and Muhammed. All religions have their origin in God and are different reflections of the same truth. As every age requires a fresh measure of the light of God, every divine revelation has been sent in a manner befitting the circumstances of the age in which it appeared.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Iain S. Palin on August 24, 2002
Format: Paperback
At first glance it would seem hard to find two religious systems with less in common than Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith. Both are established "world religions" but that seems to be about all.
Hinduism is very old, has a huge following, and is concentrated in one part of the world, indeed is intimately associated with it ("Hindu" and "India" have the same root). Its rich tapestry includes elements of popular polytheism. Baha'i is only just over a century and a half old, with a much smaller following spread throughout the world, is very definitively of the "Abrahamic" tradition of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and is sternly monotheistic.
And yet it is a basic Baha'i teaching that the world's religions have a common source, share a basic spiritual truth, and have more in common than what divides them. How, then to reconcile these two faiths?
Momen, a noted scholar of the Baha'i teachings, makes a brave attempt in this short book. It is aimed at the general reader and so lacks the weight that academics are looking for, but within that framework the result is interesting and challenging. And it is always good to read a book about different religions which is not going down the "I am right, you are wrong" route but rather says "Let's look and see whether we might both be right".
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By William Garlington on October 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
At the beginning of Hinduism and the Baha'i Faith Dr. Momen announces that Baha'is do not believe that the Baha'i Faith has come to supplant Hinduism. Rather one of its aims is to take the tradition on to a further stage of its development. (xi) To the extent that his book has opened up an arena for both current and future dialogue between the Hindu and Baha'i traditions, it must be measured a success. Moreover, its attempts to find a common ground of religious truths shared by the traditions can only help in this enterprise.Where differences are noted and critiqued, it can only be hoped that such analyses will produce among its readers (of whatever religious or secular affiliation) what Huston Smith has termed the wisdom of listening. Without listening, the world is left with a myriad of loud assertions, and even louder counter assertions, to which the fundamentalisms of our time -- including certain strains of militant Hindutva and of theocratic Bahaism -- readily attest. In Smith's own words: "Those who listen work for peace, a peace built not on ecclesiastical hegemonies but on understanding and mutual concern"
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