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Hiram's Honor: Reliving Private Terman's Civil War Paperback – March 20, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 242 pages
  • Publisher: TESA BOOKS (March 20, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0615278124
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615278124
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 8.9 x 5.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,062,805 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Max R. Terman was born in Mansfield, Ohio, received his
B. A. from Spring Arbor University and Ph. D in zoology from Michigan State University. For thirty seven years he taught biology and environmental science at Tabor College in Hillsboro, Kansas and authored many scientific articles in the field of ecology and animal behavior. An avid golfer, he researched the potential of golf courses to be wildlife habitat and more environmentally compatible. He retired in 2006 to devote more time to writing. His first book in 1985, "Earth Sheltered Housing: Principles in Practice", described the building of his solar powered earth-covered home on fifteen acres of restored prairie and introduced solutions to the looming energy crisis. In 1996, Princeton University Press published his engaging story "Messages From An Owl" about the radiotracking of a hand-reared great horned owl--for over ten years! This book reads like a novel and won wide acclaim from scientists and general readers alike. Recently, Dr. Terman used his writing skills to enter the world of an ancestor who fought in the American Civil War. "Hiram's Honor: Reliving Private Terman's Civil War" is a dramatized first person account of his great-uncle's capture at Gettysburg and amazing survival as a prisoner of war at Richmond's Belle Island and the infamous Andersonville prison camps. Dr. Terman writes as if he were Private Hiram Terman of the 82nd Ohio Infantry in this unique, amazing tale of friendship, faith, hope, and survival against incredible odds.

The sequel to Hiram's Honor should be available soon. Following in the footsteps of Hiram's Honor, one of Online Colleges Best Books For Studying the Civil War, Hiram's Hope tells how Isaiah, left for dead at Andersonville, survives only to board the ill-fated, over-loaded steamer Sultana. Max Terman weaves a story around this tragedy with the Lincoln Funeral Train, a woman left at Andersonville, and a veteran's struggle to recover his life as threads in an intricate tale about the last days of the Civil War.

Customer Reviews

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I have ever been one to read novels, but this book has changed my mind.
Timothy E. Massey
The story gives you a glimpse into the life of the ordinary soldier during one of the most traumatic times in our history.
Carrie Zeidman
I highly recommend this book to readers who are interested in this period of time in U.S. history.
smhopkins

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Timothy E. Massey on September 27, 2013
Format: Paperback
I have ever been one to read novels, but this book has changed my mind. Inside this work are 240 pages of fun, adventure, heartache, misery, death, and jubilation. The author Max Terman leads us in the footsteps of his ancestor Private Hiram Terman a soldier of the 82nd Ohio. We get the feel of walking along beside him as his unit marches off to Camp Tod for training. Here we get a taste of camp life and the "not knowing", waiting for orders to move. We continue to walk in his shoes until that fateful day he is captured at Gettysburg and again the waiting, and more of the not knowing. We get a feel of jubilation that he is going to be paroled, only to find out that General Meade has refused a prisoner swap.

Then the long, hungry, thirsty, dry march to Richmond and again, the not knowing what is coming next. We feel his pain at losing friends and of his will to survive. I will not spoil the remainder to the book, but a good half of this work deals with life as a prisoner of war. One can feel the isolation and deprivation as they read the pages. If one has ever followed the life of a captive who is sent to the lower bowels of human treatment by his fellow man, then this is the place to gain an understanding.

I recommend this fine book and appreciate all the maps and pictures. The author visited many of the sites described in the book and has provided modern photographs of these locations and modern markers as well.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Lester on August 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a really good book. Dr Terman has taken the large topic of the Civil War and made it very personal. His great uncle Hiram is in the first person. The soldier's wide and profoundly sad experiences are carefully and clearly explained. Dr Terman has also taken on Hiram's POW experiences and described these with great sensitivity.
Dr Terman's background as an educator and scientist are used to advantage. His language is both clear and accurate. He has gone to the trouble of explaining biological and medical aspects of the Civil War that are generally lost to readers.
I recently finished reading several of Winston Groom's Civil War books and Shelby Foote's 3000 page narrative. These are wonderful books and I recommend them highly. However, no living person was present during the Civil War. Many names and places were taken for granted by earlier generations. Dr Terman makes no such assumptions and educates us where we probably need educating.
This is the ideal book for students just becoming interested in the Civil War. It is well written.
John B Lester
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Virginia Allain on January 13, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Although this is a fictional version of the author's Civil War ancestor's experience, it does a wonderful job transporting the reader into the blood, guts and privations of that time.
Hiram Terman sets off for war, a naive young man caught up in the patriotic bravado of the war. He encounters boredom, the hardships of training and camp life, then the horror of the first battle. Each battle takes you into the smoke, the shelling, the experience of having a comrade's head blown off his body.
Captured at Gettysburg, Hiram survives multiple prison camps (Belle Isle, Andersonville). He learns the importance of teaming up with others to make it through the starvation, disease and filthy conditions as a prisoner of war.
I found it a fascinating reading experience and particularly appreciated the careful scholarship and research that went into creating it. I've been working on a similar project researching my own Civil War ancestor who was at Andersonville. This book is quite an achievement in conveying the experience of an infantryman while making a compelling story of it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Scott Mingus on March 12, 2010
Format: Paperback
"But you people up North are different than us southern folk. You Yankees don't respect the old ways, every thing is money, money, money, hustle, and hustle. We're different, you know." - Virginia woman

"Ma'am, every state in the Union has different customs and such. We're here to preserve the government that allows us to be free, you, me, even the Negroes." - Private Hiram Terman, 82nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry

"Why you blasted abolitionist... I will never live under an abolitionist flag!" - the Virginian

As a native Ohioan and the descendant of numerous Civil War soldiers who served the Union during the Civil War in Ohio and West Virginia regiments, I have always had a strong bias toward books and articles relating to the Buckeye State during the Civil War. Normally I shy away from historical fiction, much preferring historical accounts of people, places, and battles, but in recent years I have become more interested in the genre of Civil War novels and have read quite a few. Dr. Max R. Terman's new book, Hiram's Honor: Reliving Private Terman's Civil War, is among the very best of these recent additions to the fictional literature of the Civil War. Terman has extensively researched the Civil War adventures of his ancestor Hiram Terman and has written a fascinating, gripping account of what it may have been like to be a common infantryman in the War Between the States. Taking Terman's known movements, his battles, and his remembrances, Terman skillfully interweaves them into a wonderfully conceived and brilliantly written narrative that takes the reader into Hiram's hypothetical world.

Dr. Terman assembles a colorful supporting cast, which gives him a chance to explore the myriad of emotions and beliefs emerging in the mid-19th century.
Read more ›
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