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Hiroshi Sugimoto Hardcover – Import, 2004


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Hardcover, Import, 2004
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Paris: Fondacion Cartier pour l'art contemporain (2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 2742753478
  • ISBN-13: 978-2742753475
  • Product Dimensions: 11.3 x 9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,311,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Jake Dobkin on May 29, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I was first introduced to Sugimoto about five years ago when I saw his Theatre series at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. His photos captured a kind of ghostly emptiness - white screens framed by the darkened outlines of seats. To capture the exposures he would leave the camera shutter open at a low aperture for an entire sitting of a film. I was really impressed at how he could transform two hours of motion into one eerily still exposure.
This new series of seascapes does not disappoint. At first, each of the prints seems tediously the same- the same horizon placed at the center of the frame, the same gray tones. Later, as you begin to explore each print and compare them, you realize the qualities of light vary tremendously from one to the next, as does the mist and the clouds and the shape of waves on the water. Once again, Sugimoto has captured a stillness that goes beyond ordinary experience.
Enjoy it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Conrad J. Obregon VINE VOICE on November 13, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This book is divided into four parts. The first, "Mathematical Forms: Surfaces" and the second "Mathematical Forms: Curves" consist of photographs of models that were created to illustrate trigonometric equations for mathematical study in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, like conic projections and spheres. The third part, "Mechanical Forms" shows models from the 19th century that demonstrated mechanical movements like cams and gears. The fourth part consists of photographs taken of an installation of the pictures from the first three parts as well as Sugimoto's reproduction of Marcel Duchamp's "Large Glass, or The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even". This last part is so different from the first three that it must be considered on its own.

The first three parts show the models, in black and white prints, all apparently illuminated by a single light from the left, and because of this light, modeled in a way similar to the first drawings of a shadowed apple, made in a drawing class to teach the student how to create three dimensions on a two dimensional surface. The backgrounds to the models are completely in black. Sugimoto has said that although these models were created without artistic intention, they illustrate that "Art is possible without artistic intention and can be better without it."

Certainly the models are quite beautiful in their own right, but I suspect that if we saw, for example, one of these sets of gears, encrusted with grease in a machine, we might pass by it without a second glance or thought. Clearly, as far as these photographs go, it is the photographer's intention to portray the beauty of these objects, and to impose form on the content, that makes them beautiful and that makes the photographs art.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
standing regally before sugimoto's lens, these object appear to almost inhale and breathe.

i've seen these kinematic and mathematical objects in person, but - in this book they appear to rise up and almost float away.

it's like a japanese delicacy and will leave you wanting more.

[...]
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