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His Panic: Why Americans Fear Hispanics in the U.S. Hardcover – February 26, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Celebra Hardcover; First Edition edition (February 26, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451224140
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451224149
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #667,282 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

With lengthy anecdotes and limited analysis, journalist Rivera attempts to change the negative misconceptions about Hispanic migrants in this exploration of illegal immigration in the US today. Often reading like a rebuttal to the pundits and politicians he's come to blows with throughout his storied career-Lou Dobbs, Rep. Tom Tancredo, Michelle Malkin and others-Rivera's counterarguments frequently come in the form of Latino success stories such as Eddie Olmos and Cheech Marin (with whom, as he never misses an opportunity to mention, Rivera maintains close, personal relationships). More worthy sections deftly refute claims that illegal immigrants have hurt the economy, using strident statistical evidence and cagey reasoning. Rivera's wide net can lead to rambling; the immigration stance of Cesar Chavez and race relations in Miami are notable digressions. His most poignant (and fresh) argument comes in his closing statement, that the burgeoning Latino voting bloc, alienated by conservative immigration vitriol, could very well be the undoing of the GOP in 2008. Astute observations such as this save what could ultimately been written off as another Al Capone's Vault.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“Poignant and fresh...Astute observations.”
Publishers Weekly

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

We were not a welfare state at the turn of the century.
T. Marsh
Rivera vigorously argues that most immigrants, be they legal or illegal, work hard and contribute a great deal to the American economy.
Paul Tognetti
Unlimited immigration for an unlimited time is not sustainable.
MRHULOT

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By D. MILLS on September 15, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is Geraldo's attempt to address the anti-immigrant hatred and paranoia. After his infamous April 2007 confrontation with Bill O'Reilly, Geraldo noticed how vitriolic attacks, myths and outright lies shaped the immigration debate in the nation.

Most striking is that Geraldo honestly admits the bad and the ugly with respect to Hispanics. With respect to gangs, Geraldo openly and honestly admits that in some areas Hispanic gangs are a "severe and undeniable problem". He openly admits that some gangs have targeted black people specifically because of their race. He admits that immigrant labor lowers the wages of low end jobs. He admits that Hispanic performance in education is not admirable. The honesty in this book is refreshing.

This is not a hit piece. It doesn't dissect the words of Dobbs, Tancredo and Gilchrist taking comments out of context with the intent to insult individuals. Although this book is written to criticize the paranoid, radical anti-immigration leftist dogma, the book also explores what Geraldo refers to as America's "honorable tradition of open-minded welcome" of immigrants. He provides examples of citizens who appreciate immigrants, cherish the contributions they make to society and make efforts to accommodate them.

What is most evident in this book is the contrast between Geraldo's perspective and that of anti-immigration fanatics. Tancredo sees poor, brown skinned people in Miami and declares it a third world country [It's not a country; it's a city, but nevertheless]. In contrast Geraldo sees homes where parents hug their children, where men and women go to work, where friends play basketball or soccer together, where young lovers hold hands and where young and old like to take an occasional afternoon off to go fishing.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By MRHULOT on June 30, 2009
Format: Hardcover
It is insane for any country to encourage massive immigration of any people that harbor territorial or religous grievances against the host country.
Nearly all of the population growth in our country in the last 40 years has come from immigration. None of the immigrants are encouraged to assimilate as our ancestors once were and did.
Unlimited immigration for an unlimited time is not sustainable. The American public has become aware that its desire to see less immigration and zero illegal immigration has been denied by special interests for decades.
The Democrats want to impmort a new people that will vote Democrat, the Republicans want more compliant workers that will work for slave wages and the ethnic advocates and race hustlers want more of their unassimilating ethnic group to seize more power.

When borders change, people die. Look it up. People are playing with fire!
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By Vondilene on February 10, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
This was an overall good book. However, I was expecting more. I have written a little on this subject just from my own experiences and observations. I tried to analyze the problem from a cultural and psychological standpoint. He didn't seem to look at it from this perspective. He used a lot of statistics. I love statistics. The problem is, you can always find something that says the exact opposite. You have to draw the reader to your side, and THEN use statistics to reaffirm your position. He also seems to point fingers quite often. Which only lowers him to their level. I did enjoy reading this book.
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16 of 25 people found the following review helpful By C. Baker VINE VOICE on April 12, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I was given Geraldo Rivera's book, His Panic, as a gift. I have to admit when I picked up the book I expected to find a screed filled with hyperbole and rancorous comments about people who are concerned about the immigration issue. Instead I found a well thought out, passionate but not overly emotional argument about why Hispanic immigration is good for America not bad. It is an outstanding treatment of the issue.

Geraldo's main point in this book is that Hispanic immigration is a good thing not a bad thing. He points out that Hispanic immigrants integrate into American society much like other immigrants in the past have done, such as the Irish and other European immigrants in the last century. Successive generations become more educated, more successful, and more "American" in their outlook and attitudes. The key difference being that Hispanics have another language, Spanish, which is the main tongue of early immigrants, and that Hispanics are readily identifiable ethnically. While Geraldo never explicitly states it in this book, underlying racism certainly seems to play a role in Americans' fear of Hispanic immigrants coming to this country.

Throughout the book Geraldo deftly, using facts, undermines the myths of Hispanic immigration, such as that immigration increases the crime rate, that they steal jobs, that it's an avenue for importing terrorism, or that they import disease. He also talks about the fear mongers in the media hyping up isolated events, such as an illegal immigrant killing innocent Americans in a drunk driving accident, to paint all immigrants, illegal or not, as creating a crime wave, when in fact, Hispanic immigrants have a crime rate that is no different than other ethnic groups.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Alex Bonilla on March 24, 2010
Format: Paperback
His panic is a word that some shouln't fear, its reality.
Hispanics are the biggest minority in the U.S after African Americans. Geraldo Rivera here tries to explain what are some of the contemplations that some Hispanics go throuhg here in the U.S. Although, there are some things that are very complex to me. For staters, how can someone whose parents were born in the Bronx, New York and is Puerto Rican can write about hispanics?

Geraldo Rivera is a Puerto Rican who was born in the United States, so he cannot see, feel, or know what is actually being a Hispanic. The book has many information about why some Americans fear Hispanics in the U.S. I can quite recall a quote from the book saying somethin like, "See-The gringos hate us". The quote came from president of Venezuela Hugo Chavez. If this really comes to spread all over the United States then some Hispanics are going to rebel against Americans. Moreover, this was during Bush's term that he said this. I also remember Hugo Chavez calling Bush the second a devil.

Geraldo's Hispanic is a book that I loved to read and there was some truth. "Here come these poor, opresses, untrained ghetto dwellers to drain the country economy... Three generations later those Irish and Polish immigrants are leaders. By 2030 it will be our turn". We, Hispanics, have come a long way, geographically, physically, and mentaly from where we were at. Many come to the U.S to prosper. Moreover, statistics show that Hispanics will be the biggest minority in 2050 in the U.S. Until then, many Hispanics will come to work because they have families in their native countries starving and close to dying.
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