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Hispanic New York: A Sourcebook Paperback – June 11, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press (June 11, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231148194
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231148191
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.7 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #649,348 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A rich anthology of the history, ethnicity, language and culture of a city with the largest and most diverse Hispanic population in the country.

(Sam Roberts New York Times)

A significant milestone in Nueva York studies as an interdisciplinary, multinational field with hemispheric and transatlantic scope.

(Catharine E. Wall World Literature Today)

...should be required reading for anyone interested in the study of people of Latin American descent in New York.

(Ramona Hernandez Latino Studies 1900-01-00)

Review

This fine sourcebook takes us on a lively, thoughtful tour of a city that many writers, artists, and cultural historians have long known but have found hard to define. With a breadth of vision that reminds us America is two continents, Remeseira has gathered a prime selection of writers and thinkers to present a kaleidoscopic, complex whole. Hispanic New York emerges as a hybrid space, a juncture where Hispanics, Latinos, Latin Americans, or any other nation-specific name they choose to call themselves may understand their past and transform it into new cultural forms.

(Susana Torruella Leval, Director Emerita, El Museo del Barrio)

Customer Reviews

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For the sake of full disclosure, I will first state that I am the co-author of the Further Reading chapter of this book.
Gregory Horvath
The obvious follow-up would be that same introduction on a national scale, and I certainly hope Mr. Remeseira does it, but this first step is put together VERY well!
TruthSeeker
As a Latino myself, I found this book enormously helpful in learning about the origins of our presence here in NY and our social, political and cultural evolution.
Alexander Delarge

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
As a Latino myself, I found this book enormously helpful in learning about the origins of our presence here in NY and our social, political and cultural evolution. The diversity of the works compiled here, from excerpts from memoirs to brief magazine-like articles to more scholarly (but accessible) essays, gave me the chance to read in more detail about material that I always wanted to know more about but never got around to. Now, editor Claudio Iván Remeseira has finally gathered it all here in one place.
Did you know that a group of 23 Spanish Sephardic Jews who arrived here in August 1654 constitute the first documented reference to Hispanics in the city? I learned this in Dionisio Cañas' excellent essay, "New York City: Center and Transit Point for Hispanic Cultural Nomadism." Cañas covers a lot of ground here as well about the arts, theater and music.
The pages from union activist Bernardo Vega's memoir offer a fascinating look into the city at the end of the nineteenth century and the early decades of the 20th. I knew about the many Cubans employed as cigar rollers in Ybor City in Tampa, Florida. But I had no idea that there were so many Puerto Rican tobacco workers here in New York, nor did I know about the tradition of readers hired by the laborers themselves to recite from newspapers, books and trade union newsletters.
Jack Agüeros continues the story of Puerto Ricans in the city into the 40's and beyond with a remarkable piece, "Halfway to Dick and Jane," about his immigrant experience as someone actually born in East Harlem. He brings us right to street level, to gangs and the ghetto and his eventual ascendance into university and his post as director of the Museo del Barrio in the 70's.
We all know about the phenomenon of Spanglish.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gregory Horvath on December 5, 2010
Format: Paperback
For the sake of full disclosure, I will first state that I am the co-author of the Further Reading chapter of this book.

I strongly disagree with the above reviewer's criticisms of this collection of key texts on the Hispanic presence in New York.

There is nothing pretentious in the writings of Jose Martí or Walt Whitman, two of the hemisphere's greatest writers--and the memoirs of Jack Agüeros and of the Puerto Rican cigar maker and working-class activist Bernardo Vega are anything but pretentious. Indeed, the book is refreshing in the rare balance it achieves, with highly accessible journalistic prose as well as texts by leading scholars (Gabriel Haslip-Viera, Clara E. Rodríguez, Virginia Sánchez Korrol, and others).

I'm also puzzled by the criticism that the book involves "nothing new." As the subtitle ("A Sourcebook") suggests and as the book explicitly states, one principal aim is precisely to bring together seminal texts that until now have been dispersed and that in some instances have been difficult to access and/or long out of print. In addition, the book does contain several brand-new texts.

I believe that this book (along with others, including "Mambo Montage: The Latinization of New York," edited by Agustín Laó-Montes and Arlene M. Dávila; "Nueva York: 1613-1945," edited by Edward J. Sullivan; and "Puerto Rican Citizen: History and Political Identity in Twentieth-Century New York City," by Lorrin Thomas) forms part of an exciting and growing body of works exploring vast, highly complex and entirely fascinating dimensions of Hispanic life in New York.

Among my favorite chapters are those by two leading chroniclers of New York City's place in the history of Latin music.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By TruthSeeker on December 14, 2010
Format: Paperback
This collection by the brilliant Claudio Remeseira is great for people like me who grew up speaking Spanish, yet was kept ignorant of the impact and importance that the Latino and Spanish language and culture has had in the USA. As the title suggests, it's a vital and MUCH CHERISHED introduction to the Hispanic and Latino presence in NYC. The obvious follow-up would be that same introduction on a national scale, and I certainly hope Mr. Remeseira does it, but this first step is put together VERY well! I very highly recommend it and wish it were required on every school's reading list so no one is left out of this vital information. But for now, we have Mr. Remeseira and his team to thank very much for this grand publication!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keiselim A. Montás on December 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is not only an important book, but a MUST have! This is a thoughtful and well researched compilation, most appropriate and timely in the context of the growing Latin@ presence and influence in the United States; indeed a must have!
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful By julia de burgos on December 2, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very pretentious, nothing new, very bad organized, confusing, a lot of mistakes in the references. Do not spend your money in this book.
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