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History of Women Artists for Children Hardcover – September 1, 1987


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Vivian Sheldon Epstein (September 1, 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0960100261
  • ISBN-13: 978-0960100262
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,851,690 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Because the contributions of women are usually omitted from history books, girls often grow up without the examples of accomplished women to encourage them. This simple book introduces children to 30 of history's great female artists, such as Augusta Savage and Rosa Bonheur, to complement the Michelangelos and DaVincis mentioned in schoolbooks. Each page is devoted to a different artist, with a one or two sentence summary of the essence of her work, a reproduction of one of her works in color or black and white, and a paragraph briefly outlining her career. Hopefully, we will see this book alongside the other art books in the children's section of the library and on your kid's shelves at home. -- From The WomanSource Catalog & Review: Tools for Connecting the Community for Women; review by FGP --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

JUDITH LEYSTER (Holland, 1609-1660)
Judith Leyster was exceptional for many reasons. She became an artist, even though her father was not an artist. It was unusual for a woman to be accepted into the Artists Guild and to have male students, yet Judith was invited into the guild and had three male students. Judith painted three different types of works: scenes of life around her, portraits and still-lifes. Judith Leyster signed her paintings with her initials J L and then added a star. This stood for her last name which meant "Lodestar." For many years, some of her paintings were thought to have been created by a male artist of her day, Frans Hals, until the paintings were cleaned well, and the J L * was discovered. Judith married an artist and had three children. After marriage, she had very little time to paint. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By m-starr on September 21, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book provides one-page thumbnail sketches of 30 women artists, with one illustration per artist. The sketches are primarily biographical, describing how particular artists were able to become artists despite social obstacles. As a result, much of the text dwells on the artists' fathers and husbands, and how the latters' skills, attitudes, connections, and/or money facilitated women's careers. Telling us so much about male patronage and protection, and so little about artistic style and contribution, seems a huge disservice to the subject of women artists! The text and illustrations do not seem geared toward children: it would be easy to select illustrations that are more visually and intellectually appealing to kids. I was also surprised to see so many current artists included (6 of the 30 still living), while several pioneers of 20th century art not covered (e.g. Gabriele Munter, Sonia Delaunay, Frida Kahlo). Even so, with so little in the way of surveys of women artists available for children, this book is a worthy contribution.
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