History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$9.49
Qty:1
  • List Price: $9.99
  • Save: $0.50 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science Paperback – October 11, 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1477598306 ISBN-10: 1477598308

Buy New
Price: $9.49
3 New from $9.49 2 Used from $65.94
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, October 11, 2013
$9.49
$9.49 $65.94
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$19.59
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science + Religion and Science
Price for both: $21.75

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 198 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (October 11, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1477598308
  • ISBN-13: 978-1477598306
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.4 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,917,829 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

This early example of historical evidencing of the conflict thesis argues that the history of Christianity, especially Roman Catholicism, demonstrates repeated examples of the stifling of scientific development. It is now seen as one of the central texts of this school of thought. --This text refers to the Printed Access Code edition.

From the Publisher

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

At least the author implies as much.
Terrence K. Nichols
He is contemporary (1881) with great events regarding the relationship between science and religion, yet everything he covers is applicable in today's world.
Jake D
This is what has the greatest appeal to me in this book.
Asko Korpela

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Jake D on September 13, 2010
Format: Paperback
I found this to be an amazing book, comparable to HG Well's Outline of History. Before I read it I checked on the biography of the author, as I wanted to make sure he had the intellectual standing to write such a book before I invested my time in it. He does. You can check him on Wikipedia. He is contemporary (1881) with great events regarding the relationship between science and religion, yet everything he covers is applicable in today's world. He recognized the importance of the conflicts that were emerging and investigated the history of the relationship between science and religion, observed their present state, and makes what turns out to be very accurate predictions of exactly the situation we are in today. I am a student of history and I could find no fault with his presentation of historical facts, though he presents them in a context is unique to him at that time.
With the publication of Stephen Hawkin's book, "The Grand Design" we are seeing a replay of the same conflict again between a static belief system and a system that is constantly expanding, making Draper's book all the more relevant in understanding just what is happening and why.
As a plus, the author is an excellent writer of his time and I enjoyed his civility, and how he uses his words. A great relief from the "yell at you" style that seems popular now. If anyone is interested in a well thought out and intelligently presented explanation of why civilization finds itself in the conflicts we see everyday in the news, I recommend this work.
BTW the University of Va. has a copy of this book in it's online library. I'd recommend reading the preface there to see if you'd like it. May be able to get a sample on the Kindle also.
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Hal the skeptic on December 25, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What a refreshing encapsulation of the history of religion and how it stifled science! I was shocked to find that the author is from the mid-19th century. I have picked up many new insights into all religions and the politics of religion. Well written, though sometimes tough to follow author's thoughts (due to (unavoidable) inaccuracies in transcription). Will read more by author and further investigate some of his claims regarding very early astronomy - just the kind of action that reading a good book should generate! I loved it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steven H Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on February 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover
John William Draper (1811-1882) was an (English-born) American scientist, philosopher, historian, and photographer. He wrote in the Preface to this 1874 book, "The antagonism we thus witness between Religion and Science is the continuation of a struggle that commenced when Christianity began to attain political power. A divine revelation must necessarily be intolerant of contradiction... The history of Science ... is a narrative of the conflict of two contending powers, the expansive force of the human intellect on one side, and the compression arising from traditionary faith and human interests on the other. No one has hitherto treated the subject from this point of view. Yet... it presents itself... as the most important of all living issues... What I have sought to do is, to present a clear and impartial statement of the views and acts of the two contending parties..." (Pg. vi-vii, ix)

He notes that "I have had little to say respecting ... the Protestant and Greek Churches... In speaking of Christianity, reference is generally made to the Roman Church, partly because its adherents compose the majority of Christendom, partly because its demands are the most pretentious, and partly because it has commonly sought to enforce those demands by the civil power." (Pg. x-xi) He explains his own perspective: "It is enough for us ourselves to know that, though there is a Supreme Power, there is no Supreme Being. There is an invisible principle, but not a personal God... All revelation is, necessarily, a mere fiction... There is no such thing as Providence... The vital force which pervades the world is what the illiterate call God." (Pg.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dalton C. Rocha on January 14, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I read this regular and very old book, here in Brazil. I read an internet ediction, for free reading.
This book has many problems:
1-Has an obvious anti-catholic bias. The Pope seems to be ever wrong, in this book.
2-Being writen many decades ago, talks about its time, not our times.
3-This book has almost no place to science in China, Islam, Japan or even Ortodox countries.
On the preface itself, I could read:"Ecclesiastical spirit no longer inspires the policy of the world. Military fervor in behalf of faith has disappeared. Its only souvenirs are the marble effigies of crusading kings, reposing in the silent crypts of churches in their tombs."
I don't know if this same preface is in this ediction of this book. I read an online ediction made in 1889, but even so, old times weren't so bad as I thought.
And this book was a success; a best-seller in its subject, with more than ten edictions, but who will think today that "Ecclesiastical spirit no longer inspires the policy of the world. Military fervor in behalf of faith has disappeared. Its only souvenirs are the marble effigies of crusading kings, reposing in the silent crypts of churches in their tombs."?
Well, today, all the great conflicts are religious wars.
Crusades are being did today in Iraq and Afghanistan. More than 98% of all Americans that died in wars, in the last thirty years, died in crusades against Saddam Hussein, Talibans, Al-Qaida, etc.
Old times seemed such as a nightmare for me, full of tuberculosis, eugenics,etc. but after to read this book, I realized that old times weren't so bad as I thought. They had persons with wisdom too.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews