The History of Islamic Political Thought and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: $43.95
  • Save: $19.46 (44%)
Rented from Amazon Warehouse Deals
To Rent, select Shipping State from options above
Due Date: May 29, 2015
FREE return shipping at the end of the semester. Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with rentals.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This book is shelved in the Islam section of our retail store and may require extra shipping time - Crisp clean unread paperback with light shelfwear to the covers and a publishers mark to one edge - Nice!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Qty:1
  • List Price: $43.95
  • Save: $10.73 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $13.84
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The History of Islamic Political Thought, Second Edition: The History of Islamic Political Thought: From the Prophet to the Present Paperback – July 19, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-0748639878 ISBN-10: 074863987X Edition: second edition

Buy New
Price: $33.22
Rent
Price: $24.49
22 New from $27.45 16 Used from $26.72
Rent from Amazon Price New from Used from
eTextbook
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$24.49
$33.22
$27.45 $26.72
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

The History of Islamic Political Thought, Second Edition: The History of Islamic Political Thought: From the Prophet to the Present + God's Rule - Government and Islam: Six Centuries of Medieval Islamic Political Thought
Price for both: $61.35

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Edinburgh University Press; second edition edition (July 19, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 074863987X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0748639878
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 0.9 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #321,582 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This is an outstanding and most welcome book. Since its first publication in 2001, Islam and its corollaries of Islamism and Islamophobia have become household words and everyday currency in Western media. Unfortunately, the upsurge of rhetoric is not equivalent to any substantial knowledge in this area. Fortunately, this revised and updated edition of the text can remedy the pervasive historical and intellectual knowledge gaps. Antony Black, one of the most renowned historians of intellectual and religious ideas, offers us a guide to a complex but crucially important topic in our time. His book deserves the widest possible readership. -- Fred Dallmayr, author of Dialogue Among Civilizations This is an outstanding and most welcome book. Since its first publication in 2001, Islam and its corollaries of Islamism and Islamophobia have become household words and everyday currency in Western media. Unfortunately, the upsurge of rhetoric is not equivalent to any substantial knowledge in this area. Fortunately, this revised and updated edition of the text can remedy the pervasive historical and intellectual knowledge gaps. Antony Black, one of the most renowned historians of intellectual and religious ideas, offers us a guide to a complex but crucially important topic in our time. His book deserves the widest possible readership.

About the Author


Antony Black is Emeritus Professor in the History of Political Thought in the Department of Politics at the University of Dundee.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Hard Worker on May 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
I stumbled upon this book for one of my early research papers about Islam, and I was amazed. This is truly an academically honest masterpiece. It covers everything from the political system created in Islam right after Muhammad's death to the contemporary Salafi movement including the work of Maududi, Qutb, and Khomeini. It also references common hadiths, fikh, and the Sira, which is a breath of freash air because recently everybody believes they are an Islamic scholar but they've only remotely studied books about the Qur'an (not even the Qur'an itself, seriously it's frustrating in academia).

The bottom line is if you're a student (informal or formal) of Middle Eastern and Islamic politics you need this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Listo on September 7, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
THIS IS A REVIEW OF THE FIRST EDITION, NOT THE SECOND

Antony Black is a brilliant scholar. His 'A World History of Ancient Political Thought' was lucid, informative, balanced, and thoughtful. This was informative, balanced, and thoughtful, but incredibly poorly edited. It could have done with far more care and thought for the reader-- Are we going to define terms? Are we going to use those terms consistently? Basic titles like Caliph, Imam, and Emir are tossed around interchangeably with their translation, not to mentioned lesser-known titles, concepts, and institutions from the Islamic political experience. The editing comes across as rushed and the text as unduly confused. This book could be far more readable with a good developmental edit. I'm hoping that's what the second edition received aside from a post-9/11 update. Had it a few more months editing, the author, publisher, and audience would have had a better product for the English-speaking world to better understand the Islamic world when it most needed to. Instead it had very sloppy book on a very relevant topic by a very intelligent scholar.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By greg taylor VINE VOICE on June 27, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The first thing I should state is that I am no expert in Islamic studies. I have dabbled in reading the Qur'an and the Falsafa. I do not know enough about the history of the Near East and North Africa do consider myself conversant in it. But I am well versed in the history of Europe and its philosophy
The point I am making is that I cannot state that Black's presentation is accurate and illuminating. I can say that it fits in with what I did know and introduced me to any number of thinkers and issues worth studying.
There are people these days (like Fred Dallmayr) who are trying to make Western political philosophy less provincial. Not just in the sense of looking at the history of other peoples as providing source material to discuss but in the sense of absorbing the political philosophies of other peoples to use on our own source material. In other words, to try to see our own history or the history of the world in terms of the conceptual apparatuses of other peoples.
And herein lies my problem. If Black's book is a fair and judicious presentation of the history of Islamic political thought, then I do not see that it contributes much to that effort to create a worldly or cosmopolitan political philosophy.
And I suspect that Black doesn't either.
Consider this from p. 345: "The political thought of Muslims has been significantly changed by encounter with the West. A new chapter in the history of Islamic political thought has begun." Notice the direction of influence- from West to Islam. On p. 351, he sums up what Islam has to offer today with three ideas. The first is that the Royal Advice literature offers a storehouse of prudential ethics and political realism. The second is the concept of mizan (balance)"as a guide to rational calculation in practical affairs".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By T. Carlsson on September 10, 2013
Format: Paperback
It is certainly admirable that the author carries through his ambitious project of working through all of Islamic political thought "from the prophet to the present", and he's clearly an accomplished scholar. He has done an immense amount of work in synthesizing 1400 years of Islamic political thought into 350 pages. The bibliography in this book is also very useful for those looking to go deeper into the subject.

However, I think the author has done himself a disservice in conceiving "political thought" very broadly. I didn't notice it so much in parts I and II, which included good chapters on the classical thinkers: Ibn Rush, Ibn Khaldun, Al-Ghazali and so on. But especially in parts III and IV he delves into much more obscure literature: "advice-to-the-king" treatises, the legitimating ideologies of various dynasties and administrative works on practical government. I think he should have been more discriminate in separating the classics from such peripheral and mediocre writings, and he should have focused much more on the former. I like to read about ideas that were new and original when they were conceived, not about old ideas being repeated over and over again.

Perhaps this is an impossible requirement due to the intellectual stupor of Islamic societies after the classical period. There simply weren't many original ideas to begin with. The author resolves this conundrum in parts III and IV by including a lot of second-rate material, as I already mentioned, but also by narrating the political history of later Islamic societies at some length. I did not like this approach at all. Political thought and political history are related, of course, but they are not interchangeable.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again