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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The funniest non-fiction book you will ever read
I read this book three years ago and I'm still laughing.
Griffin & Masters have created THE required reading book on everything that is wrong with Hollywood. They were able to tell the inside stories of multi-million dollar deals and make them understandable. Jon Peters, a barely literate hairdresser who happened to be friends with Barbara Streisand, and his...
Published on November 4, 2002 by 718 Session

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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars hit and miss
Plenty of good tidbits in here and an excellent feel for the way the insane Hollywood system works. The mix of muckraking, gossiping and moralizing, however, confuses as much as it delights. It's difficult to figure out a coherent timeline (one should have been provided as an appendix), and despite the title's focus on Guber and Peters, they disappear as the tale...
Published on February 18, 1999


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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The funniest non-fiction book you will ever read, November 4, 2002
By 
718 Session (Brooklyn, NY United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Hit and Run (Paperback)
I read this book three years ago and I'm still laughing.
Griffin & Masters have created THE required reading book on everything that is wrong with Hollywood. They were able to tell the inside stories of multi-million dollar deals and make them understandable. Jon Peters, a barely literate hairdresser who happened to be friends with Barbara Streisand, and his business partner Peter Guber schmoozed their way through the 80s and were picked by Sony to run their newly acquired Columbia/Tri-Star pictures. Billions of dollars in losses later (Last Action Hero, I'll Do Anything) they got kicked out.
It is really an incredible story. If it was fiction, you'd think it completly impossible to believe, but it is all true.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A compelling tale of a great Hollywood tragedy, February 9, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Hit and Run (Paperback)
The authors have done an amazing job of compiling an incredible amount of information and assimilating it in a well-thought out and informative manner. The story of how Jon Peters and Peter Guber were able to so completely screw Sony is unbelievable. Yet, Kim Masters and Nancy Griffin boil all the subplots down into a manageable and compelling story that is completely accessible. It isn't often that a non-fiction book reads like a novel. An absolute must-read for anyone interested in the film industry.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Book is not really business like, but a GREAT read, March 5, 1998
By A Customer
The myth of film production will be shattered once you read this book. Guber and Peters, people who would not survive in any other business other than the entertainment business, are given a free pass to create medicre films and become some of the most powerful players. This is coming from one of the guys who was once a hairdresser (showing that connections really is king in Hollywood). Candidly reveals those involved in Hollywood as unstable, unsure of themselves while being major egoists! One begins to wonder how movies can be made at all given the pull that comes from all sides. However, the role of the producer is still underplayed. I still don't know why one is required, but if they make all this money to yell and scream, maybe I should go to Hollywood, I can do that with the best of em! So if you ever wonder why most movies in Hollywood suck, don't blame the director or the actors, it's rarely their fault. it's more likely the "I think I know it all" producer took out all of the story to add in another 10 million dollars worth of special effects! Guys, at least go to film school.......
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to lose a lot of money in Hollywood., July 6, 2005
By 
Kevin M Quigg (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Hit and Run (Paperback)
I think the subtitle of the book says it best. Jon Peters and Peter Guber took Sony for a long and expensive ride in Hollywood.

The book also serves as a biography of these two famous gentlemen and how they managed to take credit for a lot of other peoples creativity. They took credit for other peoples ideas and then promoted the hell out of these movies and managed to make themselves rich. As the authors put it, most people in Hollywood knew their reputation. It took a foreign business (Sony) buying Columbia to figure out their less than stellar management capabilities. For this, Sony lost a ton of money.

The authors do a nice job of detailing Guber and Peters backgrounds and their unique chance at changing the landscape of Hollywood. This is a fairly long book, but well written, so the time flies when you read it. A great read about the sordid business of Hollywood.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A different look at the Hollywood Machine, August 14, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Hit and Run (Paperback)
Nancy Griffin and Kim Masters has written a interesting book about the two Hollywood Hustlers: Jon Peters and Peter Guber. The way they tell their side of the story makes it a wonderfull book. Just the part of the book, that tells to story og Sony and the purchase of Columbia and Tri-Star is worth every penny. You just sit back and wonder, how did they hustle their way all the way to the top.
To read something else about Peters and Guber, I've strongly recommend "Burton on Burton", where Tim Burton gives his personal view on them.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars As frightening as The Exorcist., March 20, 2000
By 
This review is from: Hit and Run (Paperback)
This is one of those must-read Hollywood exposes, along the lines of "The Battle for Brazil" and "Indecent Exposure". It recounts the truly amazing story of how two small-timers in the business, Peter Gruber and Jon Peters, somehow rose to the top of the industry and headed Columbia Pictures for Sony...taking them on an incredible ride of excess and mismanagement. The real villan here though is Sony's seemingly endless series of bonehead moves during their purchase of Columbia, overpaying billions and putting their trust in two of the greatest flim-flam artists in Hollywood. Not only do they grossly overpay during the purchase, but they continue to pay and pay and pay...it really does boggle the mind. It's a ringing examination of the dangers of multi-culture dealings, and an entertaining, and truly frightening, trip through the Hollywood movie machine.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars True tales from the Dark Side of Hollywood, May 31, 2000
By 
This review is from: Hit and Run (Paperback)
Nancy Griffin and Kim Masters has written a interesting book about the two Hollywood Hustlers: Jon Peters and Peter Guber. The way they tell their side of the story makes it a wonderfull book. Just the part of the book, that tells to story og Sony and the purchase of Columbia and Tri-Star is worth every penny. You just sit back and wonder, how did they hustle their way all the way to the top.
To read something else about Peters and Guber, I've strongly recommend "Burton on Burton", where Tim Burton gives his personal view on them.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An essential book on Hollywood, May 11, 2001
By 
This review is from: Hit and Run (Paperback)
Halfway through this title, I thought it was a good read and I was happy I picked it up. At the end of the book I realized there is only one word for it: essential. Masters & Griffin seize on extraordinary story--Guber's and Peters's rise to executive status--and make it better. Filled with fabulous anecdotes, such as the celebration of an obese company vice president falling into a swimming pool while Peters cheered, this book is recommended for anyone who wants a primer on how business in Hollywood is, occasionally, done.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a clunky read with a terrific story, April 16, 1997
By A Customer
Two-author books are often not very seamless. That is the case with "Hit and Run". But hey, not to bother with trivialities. This is a fine account of the two hardy boys who swankered the Japanese out of BIG money in the Sony deal that even Hollywood hardliners found difficult to beleive. Peters' romance, such as it was, with Streisand is an interesting side note as well as are the descriptive accounts of such notorious bad boys as Walter Yetnikoff, Steve Roth and so many others. Isn't it amazing how two losers such as Peters (a former hairdresser) and Guber, a backstabber if there ever was one, could rise to such lofty positions of mediocrity. Read this for a fine insight into Hollywood, New York and the adventure that Sony has embarked on in recording and movies. It almost makes you feel sorry for the guys who brought us Pearl Harbor
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating illustration of testosterone on steroids!, January 4, 1997
By A Customer
Feeling like a skinny wimp brushing sand off your face?
Instead of Charles Atlas reach for a copy of "Hit and Run".
This brillantly written account of Peter Guber and Jon Peters
assent in Hollywood culiminating with their co-chairmenship
of Sony Pictures is a true how-to for anyone short on personal
chutzpah. Details of Guber and Peters personal interaction skills in-
cluding verbal assaults and tantrums on desktops will get
even the meekest reader's blood pumping and send them off in
search of their own victim. As a business professional I
found Griffin and Masters' book chronicling the pathetic
waste and destruction left behind by this duo to be one of
the best business books I've read in a long time. And I
found the depiction of their in-your-face management style
to be a refreshing respite from mild-mannered Dilbert.
In addition to a primer on the Sony company and the highly
competitive consumer electronics industry the book is chock
full of juicy tidbits on the 'stars'. (Check out Jack
Nicholson's advice to Kim Basinger on the set of 'Batman'
concerning her 'performance' with Jon Peters.)

Possessing extreme self-confidence, tenacity, and greed,
Jon Peters and Peter Guber exemplify the best and worst of
achieving the American Dream in "Hit and Run."
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Hit and Run
Hit and Run by Nancy Griffin (Paperback - June 17, 1997)
$28.99 $26.09
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