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Hitch Paperback


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers; 1 edition (September 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 015205619X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0152056193
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #628,710 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up–Despite the Great Depression, 17-year-old Moss Trawnley, introduced in Airfield (Harcourt, 1999), thinks he has it made–a decent job, a girlfriend, and admittance into radio school with almost enough money saved to pay for it come fall. He is even able to help his mother support his younger siblings. All this changes when he is fired in order to give the job to a man with a family who is related to the boss. Moss leaves Texas by hitching a ride on a freight train. Trying to locate his father, he finds him in Montana–drunk, jobless, and homeless. He himself is picked up for vagrancy. With neither job prospects nor money and to avoid another arrest, he joins the Civilian Conservation Corps. The work is hard, but it provides a place to live, food, and money to send home. Hitch is essentially a coming-of-age story. Moss, who from the beginning has shown a sense of responsibility, must now make adult decisions about how to react to adversity and discord within the CCC as he assumes a leadership role, albeit reluctantly. His growth from an impulsive teen into a thoughtful young man is told in a compelling manner. Plot and description transport readers into another time and place with accuracy and interest as Moss's true character is revealed. A good read from a masterful storyteller.–Janet Hilbun, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Gr. 8-11. Ingold does something quite interesting here. She takes a topic, the Civilian Conservation Corps, that few teens have heard of and even fewer are interested in and works a credible, involving story around it. Moreover, both her writing style and her 1930s setting feels totally true to the time. Often teens in historical novels seem like today's youth, merely plunked down in a different era. That's not true of protagonist Moss Trulawany, who seems utterly of his time. After being laid off from his job at an airstrip, Moss sets out to find his father, who is supposed to be working to help his family. But Mr. Trulawany is really an unemployed drunk, so it's up to Moss to find work. Through a string of fortunate events in which some people care enough to help him, Moss finds a job in Montana with the CCC, where, to his surprise, his leadership qualities surface. Some of the characters and situations are stock (as they might have been in 1930s books or movies), but the good versus bad simplicity of many of the incidents works in context. The story is often moving as Moss, through the CCC, changes lives, especially his own. Ilene Cooper
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Growing up, I liked cameras, my violin, reading, traveling, and running games. I flirted with becoming an actor (briefly, early, before playing a shadow, a flower, and a penguin). I didn't think about writing until I landed in a newsroom, assigned to obituaries, but it's been a straight line since.
I put a modern newsroom in my new novel, PAPER DAUGHTER. I hope you'll enjoy it and my other books for young adults. They include HITCH, a Christopher Award winner, and THE BIG BURN, historical fiction that VOYA called, "A must-read for adrenalin junkies."
Please visit me at www.jeanetteingold.com.

JEANETTE INGOLD's popular fiction for teens and middle school readers includes THE WINDOW, an American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults and International Reading Association Young Adults' Choice; PICTURES, 1918, a Texas Lone Star Reading List book; AIRFIELD, a New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age; MOUNTAIN SOLO, a Missouri Mark Twain Award nominee and Texas TAYSHAS book; THE BIG BURN, a Montana Book Award Honor Book and winner of a Western Writers of America Spur Award for Juvenile Fiction; HITCH, a Society of School Librarians International Best Book; and PAPER DAUGHTER, recipient of an Oppenheimer Gold Seal.
Her short stories include "Moving On," in TIME CAPSUE: SHORT STORIES ABOUT TEENAGERS THROUGHOUT THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, edited by Donald R. Gallo; and "Word Drift," in XANADU 3, edited by Jane Yolen.
She lives and writes in Montana.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By N. Lasky on June 2, 2005
Format: Hardcover
hEllo, im 13 and i read this in like 2 days it was very good i usually dont get hoooked on books that fast! It had parts where it was impossible to put the book down! If u want to buy a book for your boy to inspire him to do something maby get a job this is a good one!
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By Angel on June 9, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I liked this book more than I thought I would. I didn't really dislike anything about the book. It was a great book.
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By Martin E Sargent on November 19, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I'm always looking for books that my 11 year old son would enjoy. He loved this historical fiction. The story gave us a view of life during the Depression and life at a CCC camp. Moss, the main character, had to make several choices for his life and it led to several great discussions in our home. My 13 year old daughter also really enjoyed the book.
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By C. Hall on March 29, 2012
Format: Paperback
Times are tough when 17-year-old Moss Trawnley loses his job. It's the Great Depression years, and work is hard to come by, so Moss packs up and leaves, searching for his shiftless father. He finds him, but his father is not a man who'll take up his family responsibilities. So it's up to Moss, and thankfully, a job with the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps)provides an income. But Moss gets more from his new government job than a regular paycheck to send back home. He learns about personal responsibility, and loyalty, honesty and humility. Moss' search for the man of the family turns out to be...Moss.

Jeanette Ingold has captured the times and the voice of those Depression years of struggle in America, and particularly in Montana where the story takes place. Moss' story is a hard one, but there's hope for him when he signs up for a hitch with the CCC. I'm a big fan of historical fiction with action and truth in the telling. Ingold absolutely nails it.
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