Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.99
  • Save: $8.00 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by goods_online3
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The cover and pages show normal wear. All items packed in bubble mailers and does not include an invoice or receipt in package. We are Goodwill North Central Wisconsin. Ships from our location within 1 business day (business days Monday - Friday) from USA. All items guaranteed
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War: How J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis Rediscovered Faith, Friendship, and Heroism in the Cataclysm of 1914-1918 Hardcover – June 30, 2015

4.6 out of 5 stars 79 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$16.99
$11.45 $11.08

2016 Book Awards
Browse award-winning titles. See all 2016 winners
$16.99 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War: How J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis Rediscovered Faith, Friendship, and Heroism in the Cataclysm of 1914-1918
  • +
  • The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings: J.R.R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Owen Barfield, Charles Williams
  • +
  • Bandersnatch: C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and the Creative Collaboration of the Inklings
Total price: $55.03
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Joseph Loconte is a Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer in Politics at The King’s College in New York City, where he teaches Western Civilization and U.S. foreign policy and writes widely about the importance of religious freedom in strengthening democracy, human rights, and civil society.

 

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (June 30, 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0718021762
  • ISBN-13: 978-0718021764
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 0.9 x 8.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #19,308 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jordan M. Poss VINE VOICE on July 29, 2015
Format: Hardcover
For a certain group, JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis are such a part of the literary, imaginative, and spiritual landscape that their insights are taken for granted. The timeless qualities of their work have divorced it from any consideration of the time in which the two men lived and wrote. Familiarity has bred contempt. What Joseph Loconte attempts in A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War is to place Tolkien and Lewis firmly back into their historical context, to throw their work into relief by looking at the world in which they wrote. Central to all of this is the war.

The two men, who became fast friends as professors at Oxford, would seem to have had little in common. Lewis was an Irishman of Ulster Protestant extraction and, by the time he went to war, a confirmed atheist. Tolkien was a devout cradle Catholic reared in England. For both men, the experience that most shaped them was the war.

Loconte begins the book by examining the world into which they were born and through which they approached the war. He gives time to explaining the Idea of Progress, the belief in the steady upward march of Europe’s scientific, enlightened culture, and its embodiment in social policies like eugenics. He looks into Freudian psychology and the marriage of the era’s Christianity to nationalism, a union that produced war fever and the demonization of the enemy. Scientific progress, the devaluation of human life, disregard for the soul and spirit, and the prostitution of religion to the nation combined to make World War I uniquely ferocious.

Into this war marched millions of young men, and Loconte by no means ignores the rest in his focus on Tolkien and Lewis.
Read more ›
Comment 95 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this a wonderful book not only because it is so well written and documented, but because it taught me so many things about the present dilemas that we face.I had thought that the first WW drastically changed the culture of the West, but Mr. Loconte shows how the prevailing culture just before the War to end all wars was really responsible for the wilingness of nations to go to war Add to this the fact that Mr. Loconte demonstrates the beauty of the lives of Tolkien and Lewis and how they managed to share their ideals in the midst of the spiritual poverty after WWI and I have to say how impressed I am by this book. Mr. Loconte writes:
Tolkien and Lewis were attracted to the genres of myth and romance not because they sought to escape the world but because for them the real world had a mythic and heroic quality…In an era that exalted cynicism and irony, Tolkien and Lewis sought to reclaim and older tradition of the epic hero. Their depiction of the struggles of Middle-earth and Narnia do not represent a flight from reality, but rather a return to a more realistic view of the world as we actually find it.'
This is his evaluation of the character of these two friends and I believe him to be right.
I am a great fan of Tolkien and Lewis but I believe that this is a book well worth reading for anyone who enjoys history.
Comment 46 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Why doesn't anyone love history anymore? This author gave an amazing historical account and world view point. He adding human experience mixed with a caution of history repeating itself and then focused on how two amazing men in history prevented bitterness and anger from taking over your life in an overwhelming dark time in history that gave many a feeling that there was no meaning to life. What God is able to do after evil strikes when we are truly pliable in His hands we just can't make this stuff up! Favorites of mine, three of the authors mentioned (Lewis, Tolkien, MacDonald) in this book cause me to want to go back and read their books all over again from this new perspective. Matter of fact I am reading Phantastes from MacDonald now.
1 Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There are some books that simply disappoint due to over-inflated expectations. While not a bad book, I am forced to place “A Hobbit, a Wardrobe and a Great War” by Joseph Loconte in that group and it ranks as one of the more underwhelming books I stumbled across in 2015. Readers who are new to C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien might appreciate this book’s strengths--and there are some--but more experienced readers will want to look elsewhere.

Loconte has crafted an excellent article that frankly was stretched too thin as a book. Bilbo's words ring true of this book. "I feel thin, sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread."

The first third of the core of the book offers an overwhelming and sweeping look at European society before World War One in which Loconte tries to offer some background to Lewis, Tolkien and their created worlds. Loconte rarely relies on primary sources and too often simply quotes a far better known scholar (Barbara Tuchman, check; John Keegan, check; Niall Ferguson, check) before heading on to the next subject. After hitting readers over the head with his take on Darwinism and eugenics, Loconte then turns to religion and the war. How churches in England encouraged men to take up arms could certainly be relevant to a book on Lewis and Tolkien. But then Loconte takes the reader on how churches in America and Germany saw God’s hand in the war and even offers his take on how Germany was portrayed after its invasion of neutral Belgium. All of this would be fine in a look at the war as a whole but has nothing to do with the matter at hand: namely how World War One shaped the creation of Middle Earth and Narnia.

This breakneck pace and reliance on generalizations offer the reader more than a few pauses.
Read more ›
1 Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War: How J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis Rediscovered Faith, Friendship, and Heroism in the Cataclysm of 1914-1918
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War: How J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis Rediscovered Faith, Friendship, and Heroism in the Cataclysm of 1914-1918