Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Hole in the Sky Hardcover – April 3, 2001

4.2 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$5.98 $0.01

Book Scavenger
Book Scavenger
Racing against time, Emily and James rush from clue to clue, desperate to figure out the secret at the heart of Griswold's new game―before those who attacked Griswold come after them too. Hardcover | Kindle book | See more for ages 9-12

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The prologue to Hautman's (Mr. Was) futuristic tale reads like an excerpt from The Hot Zone: "On November 2, 2028... an eighteen-year-old Ethiopian soccer player named Worku Roba complained of a mild headache.... Seventeen hours later, his ravaged lungs ceased to function, and Worku Roba was pronounced dead." As the story opens, a fatal influenza has killed off most of the earth's population, leaving behind the unexposed and the Survivors, who are now immune but suffer losses ranging from sensory impairment to being delusional. Four successive narrators include 16-year-old Ceej; his friend Tim; his spiritual Hopi girlfriend, Isabella; and his mute, Survivor sister, Harryette, all living "at the edge of the world" (near the Grand Canyon). The plot unfolds gradually: the few adults in their lives are being murdered by a cult of Survivors who believe it their God-given purpose to infect people with the flu, offering them up to the "Judgment of the Divine"; led by the charismatic Mother K (who hears voices), the cult offers a sense of wholeness to the damaged Survivors and a lure for Harryette. Meanwhile, Isabella follows her unshakable belief in a Hopi portal that will lead her (and Ceej) to another, better world. The plot lines intertwine in a crafty climax that, like much of the novel, leaves it to readers to draw their own conclusions. Hautman's ability to tell a story while offering simultaneous interpretations should draw a strong response from teens. Ages 12-up.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Gr 7-10-Four teens try to survive in the wake of a deadly Flu virus that has destroyed most of Earth's population by 2028. A cultish group of people immune to the disease see themselves as "the chosen" and threaten to use the virus to wipe out all other survivors. Ceej and his friend Tim set out to rescue Ceej's sister from the cult, though they're not sure if she's a prisoner or a willing participant. They meet a Hopi girl who is convinced that there is a magical path out of their diseased world and into another one. Set in and around the Grand Canyon, this is a fast-paced adventure with some intriguing ideas. Exciting rescue attempts and narrow escapes mix with philosophical and spiritual notions concerning humanity and its future. Each of the four teens narrates a portion of the story. Their voices are not particularly distinct, especially those of the boys, but seeing the action through the varied viewpoints allows readers to see different sides of the situations. The Grand Canyon works both as a grimly appropriate setting for a disease-ridden world and as a hopeful site for a mystical transformation into a new untainted planet. This transformation is hinted at throughout, but readers never really find out if it actually occurs, nor do they learn the fate of two of the protagonists. This ambiguous conclusion may disappoint some, but the involving plot and intriguing premises still make the book a worthwhile choice for those who enjoy futuristic fiction and survival stories.

Steven Engelfried, Deschutes County Library, Bend, OR

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 700L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 179 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing; First edition (May 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0689831188
  • ISBN-13: 978-0689831188
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 0.9 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,039,742 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The novel Hole in the Sky, written by Pete Hautman, takes place in 2028 in Arizona. A raging flu virus has wiped out almost all of Earth's population. A boy named Ceej, his sister Harryette, and his uncle live in an abandoned hotel next to the Grand Canyon until one day when a tribe of flu survivors attack a nearby settlement. Someone must go work the dam, otherwise it will break and the canyon will flood. Ceej and his friend Tim are left alone at the hotel. They wait for days but no one returns for them.
Ceej and Tim must now rescue Harryette, but on the way they meet a Hopi girl named Isabella who tells them of a sacred place called the Sipapuni where they can escape their flu-infected world. The Sipapuni is a hole in the ground in one world and a hole in the sky in another. Bella is strange and mysterious but intent on reaching her second world. It is hard to believe in such a thing, but it seems as if Ceej is falling for it even if Tim is not. Bella decides to aid them on their search, putting aside her desire to raech the Sipapuni as soon as possible.
The four teenagers are all forced to choose a path. Will Harryette return to Ceej and Tim? Will Tim believe in the Sipapuni or will he choose to stay in the world he knows and trusts? Will Ceej follow Bella in to the Sipapuni, if it even exists? And ultimatly, will they survived this roving, dangerous, trek?
This book was very intruiging and there wasn't ever a dull moment. It has an interesting plot and the way the flu was spread is very believable. The characters seem so real and the lonely world Pete Hautman has created seems so futuristic. This book gave me the chills because 2028 isn't that far away and it is possible for this kind of thing to happen. Overall this book was excellent and I would suggest it to anyone who was looking for something with a strange but exciting twist.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Ah, there's nothing like a good disease-based post-apocalyptic story. Author Pete Hautman has over the years been slowly but surely making a name for himself amongst the juveniles and teens of the world. In this tale written long before the haunting "Mr. Was" and National Book Award winning, "Godless", Hautman takes a classic idea (a plague destroys most of the population of the world) and gives it a couple fancy twists. The book remains relatively unknown, but with Hautman's growing reputation that may not be the case for long.

Split into four parts amongst four young protagonists, this is a story about the end of an old world, and the birth of a new. The bulk of the narration in this tale is given to Ceej. Living with his sister and his uncle just beside the Grand Canyon, Ceej gets occasional visits from his friend Tim and Tim's father. The book is occasionally interrupted by small passages from "A Recent History of the Human Race" (copyright 2038) which helpfully explains how the plague started and how life after its appearance adjusted accordingly. This is lovely conceit and saves the narrators from explaining details that they themselves wouldn't realistically be discussing with the reader. When Ceej's uncle and Tim's father decide to take a trip to a nearby dam so as to prevent a natural disaster, the two go missing. Logically, it's up to our intrepid heroes to try and save them. And the most perilous danger facing these hardy teens is a band of survivors of the flu (which renders anyone who's lived through it hairless and slightly altered) called the Kinka who've become a dangerous and violent cult, threatening our heroes' actions at every turn.

The plot that I have just described is a really good one.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
my grandson will only read if he thinks it's worth his time. so far the 2 books i bought from amazon have kept his attention very well. both were a fablous price and the delivery was very fast and the book is in excellent condition. very pleased with the transaction and i hope to deal with this seller again
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By lorene on November 21, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I love it. It is so detailed and is good for all ages! Ceej and his sister Harriet are orphans who live with there uncle in the south. Harriet is deaf and bald but she is still beautiful. One day they meet a boy named Jim. From there on the three of them go on adventures that are out of this world!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
First, I have to admit I'm a sucker for any book that starts with a map. And that I love dysUtopian novels (like The Giver and Narnia).Narrated from four points of view, with the Grand Canyon as the "main character" in this post-apocalyptic novel, the tale is one of the enduring power of love, believing, and knowing where you are. Kids who like Gary Paulsen's Hatchet, older readers who like seat-of-the-pants adventure, and teachers who are leading kids in novel-units (like THE GIVER) will enjoy this well written story. It lends itself to sequels, and would be a good beginning place for discussion of "what if" with kids. Even if you hated Stephen King's THE STAND (a cheap ripoff of Pilgrim's Progress), you'll like this one especially if you've spent time in the Grand Canyon and gone to the Sipapu-ni. Great reading, good storytelling, thought provoking premise.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Erin on September 28, 2002
Format: Hardcover
we read this book in school aswell, but in 8th gade. it was a very interesting book. And seeing as how i live in AZ, it made me want to go read it at the grand cayon (the setting of the story). It's got some interesting people, and ideas. A killer flu has spred and most everyone dies, but there are surviours, they loose something though (like they'r hearing or the abliaty to speek).
we had the aouther viset us in class as well, and to hear what he had to say about the book and answer our quetions was great!! ^^ (thanx mrs. wingert!) READ the book!! trust me u'll like it ! ^^
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?