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Hollywood Gothic: The Tangled Web of Dracula from Novel to Stage to Screen Paperback – October 7, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0571211586 ISBN-10: 0571211585 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; 1st edition (October 7, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571211585
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571211586
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.9 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #291,746 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Horror novelist Skal presents various 19th- and 20th-century interpretations of everyone's favorite black-cloaked bloodsucker. Featured here are Bram Stoker's Victorian thriller, Max Shreck in the German expressionist film Nosferatu and Bela Lugosi on stage and screen as Count Dracula. Illustrated. (Oct.)no PW review
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Tracks Transylvania's most popular vampire with dry wit and the skills of a fine detective." --The New York Times Book Review

"Witty, comprehensive . . . For those who take Halloween seriously, this is something to gnaw on long after those trick-or-treaters are gone." --The Los Angeles Times Book Review

"Meticulously researched, engagingly written and packed with rare, archival images . . . The history of Dracula reads like a novel itself." --The San Francisco Bay Guardian

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David J. Skal's book Hollywood Gothic explains a lot of the reasons why.
Found Highways
This is a good look at the early stage and film versions of Dracula; more impressive is that it's one of the very best works to look at the 1922" Nosferatu".
R. Rosener
It is very well researched and is an important book for all those with a serious interest in the subject.
Christilles

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In "Hollywood Gothic" David Skal tells the story of "Dracula" that came after the classic of gothic horror was published in 1897. It's a fascinating, fact-filled tale of colorful personalities, legal battles, Hollywood politics, and a culture still captivated by the King of Literary Vampires. The book's seven chapters begin with author Bram Stoker, end with the Count's recent incarnations on stage and screen, and include the most insightful analysis of "Dracula"'s origins that I have read in the course of my minor obsession with the novel.

Chapter 1 explores "Dracula"'s literary and theatrical predecessors before moving on to discussion of the intellectual and sexual climate into which the book was published in 1897, the life and elusive character of its author Bram Stoker, and how the novel was received in its own day. David Skal does an impressive job of pulling together the relevant details, from diverse perspectives, of the novel's birth.

Chapter 2 details the legal battle waged by the Bram Stoker's widow, Mrs. Florence Stoker, to suppress the first cinematic adaptation of her husband's novel, 1922's "Nosferatu", the unauthorized German production directed by F.W. Murnau, now recognized as a masterpiece of silent cinema. Chapter 3 sees Mrs, Stoker finally authorize an adaptation to British dramatist Hamilton Deane, whose wordy, plodding "Dracula" play nevertheless achieved great financial success, attracting the attention of American theatrical producer Horace Liveright. Liveright enlisted journalist John Balderston to rewrite the play for Broadway and make it a smash hit on this side of the Atlantic.

Chapter 4 moves to Hollywood for the protracted negotiations over "Dracula"'s film rights.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Ian Fowler on October 8, 2004
Format: Paperback
I read this book years ago. It's good to see it's coming back into print.

Skal charts the history of Stoker's book, beginning with early drafts extant, following the tangled film history, including the legal battles over Murnau's "Nosferatu", Universal Studio's struggle to get the rights for the Lugosi pic, and everything that happened after.

It won't change your life, but its fascinating stuff. Skal's style is quick, clean, and to the point. This book is a lot of fun, giving insights into publishing, film, theater, and the audience reaction to and participation in all of those mediums. A must for all vampire buffs, film students, and those who are curious about the inner workings of popular culture.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By R. Rosener VINE VOICE on October 31, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a good look at the early stage and film versions of Dracula; more impressive is that it's one of the very best works to look at the 1922" Nosferatu". The author details the occult beliefs of the producer of Nosferatu, and how it was really he (Albin Grau,) and not Director Murnau who was responsible for the verminous look of Count Orlok. Fans of the recent film "Shadow of the Vampire" will really enjoy the Nosferatu production details. Some of the Freudian psychosexual analysis is way over the top and should be taken with a grain of salt (or a clove of garlic?). However, the author is on to something when he points out the paralells between the economic paralysis and blood draining of the Great Depression with the similar symptoms of victims in the 1931 Lugosi film. Was the popularity of the film a mass catharsis? You can decide after reading this book. Skal does a great job of drawing eerie analogies between the plight of the real life players behind Dracula and characters in the novel and films.
You'll find yourself consulting and pondering over this book when watching the old films or reading the original Stoker novel. The social context in which Skal places the classical Dracula films will resonate for modern readers.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jory on July 7, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A review from the Los Angeles Times quoted on the back cover of David J. Skal's Hollywood Gothic calls the book "comprehensive." This is technically true, since the book does indeed cover the history of Dracula film and stage adaptations from the earliest days (1897, when Bram Stoker wrote a stage play version of his novel) to the most recent (2004, when the book was last revised), but a little elaboration is needed. The vast majority of the book, the first six chapters out of seven total, covers a limited area: Stoker's 1897 novel, the unauthorized 1922 film adaptation Nosferatu, the early stage plays (focusing mostly on those of the mid to late 1920s), the 1931 film starring Bela Lugosi, and the Spanish-language film produced concurrently with the Lugosi film. It's not until the seventh and final chapter that Skal covers the post-1931 adaptations, blowing through them quickly in about 60 pages, and doing his job not nearly as well as he does in the preceding six chapters (more on that below).

Those first six chapters are where the book shines. This is where Skal's interest (or, more appropriately, obsession) lies, and his enthusiasm for his subject matter makes for engrossing reading. Although he does judge the artistic value of the adaptations, he writes much more about the people behind them, both in their professional and personal lives; but like the writers from the History Channel who can somehow manage to make something like the history of toothpaste sound fascinating, Skal makes the most mundane details of these people sound nearly as interesting as (and sometimes more interesting than) the fictional drama that they put on film.
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