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Homage to Robert Schumann [Blu-ray] (2010)

Staatskapelle Dreseden , Markus Butter , --  |  NR |  Blu-ray
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Product Details

  • Actors: Staatskapelle Dreseden, Markus Butter, Daniel Harding
  • Directors: --
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Classical, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: German
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Arthaus Musik
  • DVD Release Date: September 28, 2010
  • Run Time: 77 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B003X85984
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #442,519 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

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Editorial Reviews

Between 1844 and 1859 Robert Schumann lived in Dresden where he composed a third of his complete work. This concert marks the 200th anniversary of Robert Schumann's birth and offers a welcome opportunity for Daniel Harding
and the Staatskapelle Dresden to introduce three of the most impressive but now too rarely performed works from his Dresden period (Overture to Genoveva, Requiem für Mignon and Nachtlied). Particular highlights - which will come as a surprise even to connoisseurs of his works - are a first performance and a world premiere of rediscovered and reconstructed symphonic movements dating from the composer's legendary
'symphony year' of 1841.
Moreover, the Rhenish Symphony, composed by Schumann after leaving Dresden and widely influenced by his
impressions of the Cologne Cathedral, blends in perfectly with the sacral architecture of the Frauenkirche.

Customer Reviews

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great visuals, very nice performances November 16, 2010
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
Either you like Schumann or you don't. His orchestral works have been criticized as opaque, which is why Mahler took a shot at re-doing the orchestral parts of the symphonies. If you listen to the length of the echo in this church, it only adds to that problem. However, Harding has used a fairly small orchestra here, which helps a lot. If you listen to this disc using a good surround system (I prefer dts), you will not miss much of the detail.

I liked the two vocal works a lot (first time hearing)and will return to them on the occasions I don't feel like being beaten into submission by Mahler (whose music continues to define my soul). The minor orchestral works are pleasant enough, but just that. The Rhenish symphony is very well done except for the first movement, which is not jaunty enough for my taste - things pick up in the other four movements.

The Dresden orchestra is superb, (and Harding is more than adequate) but if you want to hear them really roar, get the Mahler Symphony #1/Beethoven Piano concerto #1 by Luisi - absolutely marvelous!

I was able to get this Schumann disc for $11 on Amazon - just lucked out - timing is everything!

This disc happened to fill an empty spot in my Schumann symphony dvd collection, so for me to acquire it was a no-brainer, but if you are unfamiliar with his works, this is a really nice intro. The pleasure gained from watching these superb musicians play their individual parts far outweighs any misgivings about acoustics or slight conducting shortcomings. We have yet to be offered substantial multiple choices for any composer, so get these releases while you can, before they go the way of the already disappearing CD.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fine disc but leaves room for improvement July 7, 2012
Format:Blu-ray
This disc is entitled `Homage to Robert Schumann' and is conceived to highlight the connection between Dresden specifically with Schumann. In this connection Schumann spent 6 years in Dresden which saw the creation of about 1/3rd of his entire output including the opera Genoveva, the music to Manfred, the superb 2nd Symphony, the unique and fine Konzertstuck for 4 horns and most of his Faust music. Strange then that this disc includes the 3rd Symphony rather than the 2nd, ignores the Konzertstuck and includes instead two small reconstructions and two rather unknown, albeit important, choral works as a Dresden homage.

The Genoveva Overture opens the concert and is very effective in its dark and dramatic manner. This piece was particularly popular as a concert item during the 19th century and is certainly worth featuring here with its Dresden connection. At the other end of the concert the 3rd Symphony receives a well-played and satisfying performance which only falls short of the sort of driven excitement familiar to followers of Szell, who employs a similar traditional orchestra for instance, or Gardiner who would be a good example of the authentic instruments approach.

The two short reconstructions are pleasant enough but there are other and greater works that would have been more satisfying as homage. The short choral work, Nachtlied was a favourite composition of Schumann's and may well be unjustly neglected these days. Much the same might be said of the quality of the other choral work, the Requiem for Mignon'. Both of these works receive performances which fill unfortunate recorded gaps more than satisfactorily.

This then, in my opinion, is a useful disc of good, if not ultimately indispensable performances.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A mixed bag October 1, 2010
Format:DVD
The huge Dresden Frauenkirche is an acoustically problematic venue and requires a superlative effort from the sound engineers to fully capture instrumental and vocal textures. Fabio Luisi's 2005 DVD recording of Beethoven's "Missa Solemnis" is not seriously compromised by the Frauenkirche's acoustics, and outstanding in every other respect. The same can not be said about the Homage to Robert Schumann. Regardless of some dizzying long shots of the church's ceiling murals, the video is excellent overall and follows the various scores. The soundtrack, however, is a mixed bag: it does not always achieve a clear definition of all voices and instruments and is at times lacking in both dynamics and transparency. Also mixed is the concert's program. The "Genoveva" Overture is no great piece, and I find both the Scherzo in G minor and "Abendmusik" unmemorable. More interesting are the "Nachtlied" and the strange, rarely performed "Requiem für Mignon" -- a composition inspired by Goethe's novel "Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship" -- that crosses the borders between lied and cantata. In the latter, boys from the Dresdner Kreuzchor perform the soprano and alto parts very well. Overall, the vocal and orchestral contributions are impressive. Schumann's popular Third Symphony, clearly meant to be the concert's high point, does not quite make it. If the Dresdeners can't really shine out, it is because of the homogenized, somewhat compressed recording and Harding's routine direction. On DVD, I much prefer Nagano with the DSO and Bernstein's 1984 interpretation, dated film and all.
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