Qty:1

Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.60
Learn More
Trade in now
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$19.53
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: Amazon.com
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Home of the Brave [Blu-ray]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Home of the Brave [Blu-ray]


List Price: $29.95
Price: $18.53 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $11.42 (38%)
Only 17 left in stock.
Sold by Blue Moon Discounts and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
19 new from $10.00 6 used from $7.99
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
Blu-ray
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$18.53
$10.00 $7.99

Deal of the Week: 56% The Wizard of Oz: 75th Anniversary Limited Collector's Edition
This week only, save 56 % on "The Wizard of Oz: 75th Anniversary Limited Collector's Edition" in 3D Blu-ray, Blu-ray, and DVD with an Amazon-exclusive flash drive. This offer ends December 27, 2014, 11:59 pm PST. Shop now

Frequently Bought Together

Home of the Brave [Blu-ray] + Flying Tigers [Blu-ray]
Price for both: $33.52

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Product Details

  • Actors: James Edwards, Frank Lovejoy, Lloyd Bridges, Douglas Dick
  • Directors: Mark Robson
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Olive Films
  • DVD Release Date: May 13, 2014
  • Run Time: 86 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00IQAUO3O
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #232,599 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

A paralyzed African-American war veteran must confront his fear of forever being an outsider.
Genre: Drama
Rating: NR
Release Date: 0000-00-00
Media Type: Blu-Ray

Customer Reviews

The video is of sub standard quality.
Thomas D. Doherty
Every bit as good as I remembered, a thoroughly enjoyable, intense film to watch, and an important piece of cinema history.
ZUCKMEISTER
He isn't wounded – not in the flesh – but harrowing events on the island as well as his life, have taken a toll.
K. Reynolds

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Killian HALL OF FAME on October 23, 2006
Format: VHS Tape
Watched this one having read Donald Bogle's book and curious about James Edwards, MGM's first black leading man in the 1940s. Bogle paints Edwards as a dangerous rebel, skilled in New York acting techniques and like other newcomers to the screen, Brando and Clift, striving to bring a new realism to glossy studio confections. And in the period there seems to have been a shortlived interest in producing progressive, "social awareness" pictures that inevitably included racial struggle. All of the Hollywood studios made one or two apiece during a single year, and MGM turned out this one (along with INTRUDER IN THE DUST, an old fashioned, classic film compared to the B-movie innovations of HOME OF THE BRAVE). It is a curious piece of work, but Edwards' performance is transfigurative. He rips up the screen as Private Peter Moss, a black serviceman attached to a white volunteer platoon of engineers assigned to mao out a dangerous Pacific atoll at the height of World War II.

Blacks weren't integrated into the larger Armed Services, and only later would Harry Truman force the policy of integration down the army's throat, but of course there were individual liberals and "social conservatives" everywhere, even during the 1940s. Lloyd Bridges plays a boyhood friend of "Mossy," and he seems genuinely, even freakishly colorblind, not understanding why Moss has a problem being his friend. For him, racism doesn't exist except if individual people see it as a problem. His character, Finch, a warm volkstümlich type of guy, gets captured by the Japanese on the island and the rest of the platoon, in hiding while surveying. Were the Japanese so cruel as this movie makes them out to be?
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Thomas D. Doherty on December 19, 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a great movie. This review does not reflect on the movie itself which is a 5 star movie. However the quality of both the audio and video of the dvd is terrible. It looks like a copy of a copy of a copy of a copy etc. Audio skips and is choppy at times. The video is of sub standard quality. The picture skips and or jumps at times. This dvd is essentialy a piece of junk and should not have been sold.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John F. Gillespie on November 25, 2009
Format: DVD
The film re-enactment of the stage play was a break through for black actors as James Edwards portrayed an intelligent soldier who had developed a friendship growing up with a white teenager played by Lloyd Bridges. Sent on a mission to a Japanese held island to gather intelligence, the mission goes awry and Lloyd Bridges character is captured and tortured by the Japanese. James Edwards is forced to listen to the sounds of Bridges torture. The Americans escape, leaving Bridges behind and Edwards deeply scared by the experience. He is sent for psychartic care and under the influence of drug therapy re-lives growing up black with his white friend. In the end, the character played by Frank Lovejoy who has lost his arm and Edwards team up to work together by opening a bar in post war America, an early portent of blacks and whites being able to break out of traditional stereotypes.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D. Yarbrough on January 25, 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Sadly, this reproduction is of so poor quality that this movie is virtually unwatchable. I am keeping the DVD as it is the only copy I could fine, the message is somewhat obscured with all of the washouts, skips, lost dialog...but perhaps the message of understand, patience, and tolerance can be learned by watching such a bad reproduction.
I would recommend this movie to everyone, just not this copy of it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By thesavvybamalady VINE VOICE on August 1, 2008
Format: VHS Tape
One of the most interesting movies that I always wanted to see was this movie. I thought Lloyd Bridges would play this troop dogging on James Edwards character, but come to find out that Bridges and Edwards characters knew each other as children, and though Bridges is accepting of him, the others are more cagey of him. A very interesting character study on a platoon of soldiers in a precarious and delicate situation. I wish it was on DVD by now but sadly, it hasn't made the transition yet. I was blessed to see it on TCM (Turner Classic Movies)some years back.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 19, 2014
Format: Blu-ray
In the introduction to one of his routines, Lenny Bruce expressed his hatred for the clichéd contrivances and sanctimoniousness of Hollywood message movies, but made one exception - Stanley Kramer and Mark Robson's Home of the Brave. Which seems particularly ironic today since in the intervening six-and-a-half decades the message has been handled much more impressively by other films and the film now seems at times ripe for parody in its naiveté and clumsiness: it's an undeniably important film, but it's often not a particularly good one. Arthur Laurents' original play dealt with anti-Semitism among front line soldiers, but with Crossfire changing its murdered homosexual into a murdered Jew two years earlier, screenwriter Carl Foreman opted to change the play's Jewish soldier who cracks up due to a toxic combination of what we now know as post-traumatic stress disorder and a lifetime of racist abuse into a black soldier instead. The change works well, but the film often doesn't: it does a reasonable job of hiding its very low budget (though the voices of the unseen Japanese soldiers taunting the G.I.s are laughably poor), but much of the dialogue is horribly on the nose (there's much talk of fried chicken and watermelon), the psychiatry diluted into layman's terms for a climactic miracle cure (though the film does at least threaten a relapse) and the optimistic ending feels awfully Hollywood.

What does still work, Jeff Corey's idealist Dr Irving D.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Blue Moon Discounts Privacy Statement Blue Moon Discounts Shipping Information Blue Moon Discounts Returns & Exchanges