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Home by Choice: Raising Emotionally Secure Children in an Insecure World Kindle Edition

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Length: 304 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Brenda Hunter, Ph.D., is a psychologist and internationally published author. A specialist in infant attachment, Dr. Hunter is nationally recognized as an expert on the issue of full-time mothering, appearing on programs such as CBS This Morning, Sally Jessy Raphael, and Larry King Live. She is cofounder of Home by Choice, a support network for mothers at home.

Product Details

  • File Size: 3359 KB
  • Print Length: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Multnomah Books; annotated edition edition (September 7, 2011)
  • Publication Date: September 7, 2011
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004G8P75U
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #368,112 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 24, 1999
Format: Paperback
As a young mother struggling with the notion of returning to the workforce, I found this book particularly liberating. Everyone has to make their own choice, based on the realities of thier own life, but I found this a rare offering in a mire of "you're only valuable if you return to work" messages.
I found the author's research interesting, and reading the book certainly fuelled my fire to be an at-home mum. If you want to return to the work place, don't bother reading this, it will probably make you cranky. If, however, you are questioning the values that made you think you had to go back to work, get a copy and read on. "Home by Choice" will certainly give you some thinking fuel for your decision process.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 27, 2003
Format: Paperback
This lovely little book does a good job of arguing the case for mothers staying home with their children, if this is at all possible. It also features discussions of the most common problems that mothers at home face, and suggests some good ideas for dealing with them.
The best and most important point made by Dr. Hunter is that women who stay home have more time and energy to devote to building their marriages and their families. While the "day care" argument is open to disagreement and controversy, it cannot be debated that there are twenty-four hours in a day. The mother who devotes ten of those hours to work and related requirements (travel, etc) simply can't give as much to her family as she would probably like. When she is at home, she is often physically and emotionally drained, and possibly preoccupied with work-related problems. Her husband is almost certainly facing similar problems, so the family usually suffers to some degree.
Another very good argument is that which addresses older children and loneliness and supervision issues. Too many moms assume it's just fine to work full-time when the child goes to school. The reality is that our culture, and especially our youth culture, can be dangerous and destructive. Older children need parents who know how they're spending their time, parents who talk to them when they need it, parents who teach them right and wrong, parents who guide their friendships and media choices and parents who spend lots of time building a family that is an appealing alternative to constant peer interaction. Part time work or study can be compatible with this, but full time work will probably make it unrealistic for the parents to fully meet such needs.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
I just finished reading this book and feel revitalized about my decision to stay at home with my kids. I have always felt intuitively that what I am doing is important, but this gives me the statistics and the research to back it up. An educated woman like myself is not wasted on the care of her children. When people look back over the course of their lives they wish they had spent more time with their families, they don't wish they had spent more time advnacing their careers.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By S. L. on August 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
I am in the middle of making the transition from working full-time outside the home as a teacher the first year of my daughter's life to working full-time FROM home. I am lucky to be able to do this; in our family right now, my working is a necessity rather than a choice while DH finishes his education.

HOME BY CHOICE backed up my belief that the place I need to be is home. We women who are educated and choose to use our skills on our children rather than on (in my case) other people's children should be commended, not condemned. Regardless of what people think, the research simply supports us.

Reading this book reinforced my decision, revitalized me when I was beginning to feel alone in that decision, and re-energized my spirit so I could give more to my daughter. I HIGHLY recommend this book to any pregnant women, women who already stay at home with their children, or moms who work outside the home and don't feel particularly comfortable leaving their children in someone else's care.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
I am an educated stay at home mom who believes I am where I belong. This book supports my beliefs.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 23, 2002
Format: Paperback
And that is that children do better in the care of thier own parents. Perhaps the differences are subtle in that perhaps they are just feelings as we get older of more stability, more happiness and fulfillment with our lives having been nurtured as a child, but they are there. And I say this not only as a stay at home mother, but also as a child who endured daycare. I absolutely attribute that early experience to some problems I have had nurturing relationships as an adult(something I take responsibility for and am working on so no, this is not an excuse for them) and one need only see the differences between my brothers(much younger than me) who had my mother home and me to know there is a difference!
I don't doubt there are spectacular nannies out there, but unless you are super wealthy, it's doubtful this person will be a constant figure in your home until your child is grown and personally I'd rather my children bond with me instead of a nanny anyway.
The folks who look at this as some work bashing need to get a reality check. If this is working mother bashing, than Ms., working moms magazine, and the host of books supporting working moms are sahm bashing. If this isn't your choice and you aren't open enough to question your values than don't read the book for goodness sakes and live in your life of denial and at the very least with a narrow view of the world. Also maybe it would help for you to understand that kids really are "fragile" in the sense that they are not mini adults. People would be better off if they listened to that message and some, like myself, are even taking that reality to a new level and pursuing homeschooling as well. It's not about coddling you goof, it's about nurturing your child and honoring thier innocence and protecting thier will to learn.
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