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Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists (Anthropology and Material Culture) Hardcover – May 6, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-1845203597 ISBN-10: 1845203593

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Product Details

  • Series: Anthropology and Material Culture
  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic (May 6, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845203593
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845203597
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,474,305 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Home Cooking in the Global Village is an outstanding example of contemporary anthropology. It offers a good balance between ethnographic and historical information. With its compelling presentation on the effects of globalization, this book is ideal for courses on Latin America or the Caribbean. As the book considers the role of food, any course on the anthropology of food would benefit from it as well." —Michael R. McDonald, Florida Gulf Coast University

About the Author

Richard Wilk is Professor of Anthropology, Indiana University.

More About the Author

Richard Wilk is Provost professor of anthropology at Indiana University where he directs the Food Studies Program. With a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Arizona, he has taught at the University of California Berkeley, University of California Santa Cruz, New Mexico State University, and University College London, and has held fellowships at Gothenburg University and the University of London. His research in Belize, the USA and West Africa has been supported by two Fulbright fellowships, grants from the National Science Foundation, and from many other organizations. He has also worked as an applied anthropologist with UNICEF, USAID, USDA, Cultural Survival and a variety of other development organizations. Most recently he has testified in several important Indian land tenure cases in the Belize Supreme Court. His initial research on the cultural ecology of indigenous Mayan farming and family organization was followed by work on consumer culture and sustainable consumption, energy consumption, globalization, television, beauty pageants and food. Much of his recent work has turned towards the history of food, the linkages between tourism and sustainable development, and the origin of modern masculinity. His publications include more than 125 papers and book chapters, a textbook in Economic Anthropology, and several edited volumes.
When he is not teaching or writing, Rick is cooking, eating, fishing, turning wooden bowls and platters, or traveling somewhere to give a lecture or visit a student. He is extremely proud of the wonderful graduate students he has had an opportunity to work with at Indiana, many of whom have gone on to brilliant careers. The chance to work with creative, intelligent and committed students keeps him young, mentally alive, and always developing new interests and ideas.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Joel Stillerman on December 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
This excellent book, which I recently taught in an upper level undergraduate course, examines Belizean food from the time of Europeans' arrival to the present. It moves beyond the dichotomies of cultural homogenization and hybridity or resistance to show that globalization and localization are part of the same process and this has been true for several centuries. It is without a doubt the best thing I have read on globalization and consumption and I'll be thinking a lot about it as I develop my research on consumer culture in Latin America. I particularly liked the analyses of the symbolism of meat among pirates, respectability and reputation, the style sandwich, and the rise of Belizean cuisine. The idea of "home cooking" conterposed to the fast vs. slow food debate is terrific, and closing the book with the "beans and rice" recipe was a delightful touch. I would strongly recommend it to readers interested in globalization and consumer culture in Latin America as well as food studies.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joshua Berman on March 22, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In Home Cooking in the Global Village: Caribbean Food from Buccaneers to Ecotourists, anthropologist Richard Wilk argues against the simplistic notion that in today's hyper-connected world, "...culinary diversity is disappearing under a monotonous food landscape of burgers and fries." That's only one way to look at it, Wilk says; the other way is to see "the inevitability of globalization but ... compromise and reduce its impact by adapting and preserving local and ethnic traditions of food, music, dance, and language."

Rather than colonial and Western civilizations swallowing local culture, says Wilk, it's more global give-and-take. In other words, the same forces and factors which created the small creolized country of Belize in the first place eventually created "Belizean food," a concept that didn't even exist until the arrival of the tourist industry.

By studying Belize's food history, Wilk addresses the country's evolution from colonial backwater to international destination by looking at what people ate and what items were imported and exported from its shores. He also takes on the eternal Belizean paradox: why has such a rich, fertile chunk of Central America always had to rely on tinned food from Europe and the United States? The answer surprised me.

The book is full of many tasty, interesting morsels -- including recipes at the end of each chapter.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book on the history of globalization in Belize is very well written. It is accessible and understandable to everyone, providing an insight into events and contexts that led Belize to how it exists today. More importantly, by using Belize as a case study, it speaks volumes on consumption and globalization as a whole with great cases on its positives and negatives. I cannot recommend a better book if you are interested in global food issues from a cultural and economic standpoint.
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