Home Economics: The Consequences of Changing Family Struc... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$3.56
Qty:1
  • List Price: $3.95
  • Save: $0.39 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 16 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Friday, April 25? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Home Economics: The Consequences of Changing Family Structure (Values and Capitalism) Paperback


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$3.56
$1.86 $2.03

Frequently Bought Together

Home Economics: The Consequences of Changing Family Structure (Values and Capitalism) + American Exceptionalism: An Experiment in History (Values and Capitalism) + The Constitution: Understanding America's Founding Document (Values and Capitalism)
Price for all three: $9.77

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

100 M&T
100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime
Looking for something good to read? Browse our picks for 100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime, brought to you by the Amazon Book Editors.

Product Details

  • Series: Values and Capitalism
  • Paperback: 126 pages
  • Publisher: Aei Press (May 16, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0844772607
  • ISBN-13: 978-0844772608
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 4.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #494,553 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Nick Schulz was the DeWitt Wallace Fellow at AEI and editor-in-chief of American.com, AEI's online magazine focusing on business, economics, and public affairs. He now works in the private sector. He is the co-author with Arnold Kling of From Poverty to Prosperity: Intangible Assets, Hidden Liabilities, and the Lasting Triumph Over Scarcity (2009).

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By K. on September 9, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am surprised by Nick Schulz's book. The main thrust of this book highlights the importance of family in creating social and human capital, as well as pointing out that government programs poorly substitute the family structure. Sadly, throughout the entire book, the constant refrain is what policies should be used, what taxes implemented, etc.

The striking rise in broken homes are due to "doing something". The left-wing welfare state policies subsidizes bastardom and single motherhood, so not surprisingly bastardom increases, as does single motherhood. These same policies, also, induce broken homes, as "assistance" for nuclear families is much smaller, if at all, compared to broken homes. Parents have actually divorced because it financially made sense to do so. Lastly, the psychological impact of generations being trapped in the welfare cycle causes resentment and entitlement.

My policy recommendation, if Nick should so ask: STOP DOING "SOMETHING". The nearly monomaniacal ego needed to decide that other people are living incorrectly, combined with the certainty that you can't possibly know what's best for other people, especially those you don't know, are at least two reasons to refrain from "doing something".

As radical as this sounds, treat everyone the same. Tax people the same. Offer the same services to everyone, etc. Liberty and freedom are about making choices for your life and living with the consequences, good or bad. The knee jerk response of those arrogant enough to think they know how to run other people's lives actually makes things worse. If you think not, go to any major city, then go to areas considered ghettos.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Nick Schulz brings up the uncomfortable topic of family disintegration and shows the correlation to intergenerational poverty and perverse government policy.

He summarizes data and presents tables and graphs to illustrate his main points: In 5 decades, marriage has dramatically declined. At the same time, the poverty statistics for children raised in single-parent household have not become less grim.

The book details in depth the ways that solid families have positive beneficial impacts on the lives of the poor. Families teach the basics of character: empathy and self-control.

No government policy will be able to reverse this trend. An apocalyptic culture change has occurred; the best way to address it is not through government intervention. Schulz cites the changing of social norms surrounding cigarette smoking with a sign of how activists can address the issue.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Conner Burk on January 16, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This publication was a very insightful look into modern culture's problems and why they are there. It shows why family is influential in how people will end up later in life.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Hill Country Bob on August 20, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In this book Mr. Shultz is bringing up the issue of the composition of the American family to day. The fact that many families are only one parent, generally the mother does not get included in the discussions of what we should be doing and are doing about family and social issues in this country. He appreciates that it is and has been sensitive, and has not been included in discussions.

I have to give him credit for trying to raise the issue, but I really do not believe that society wants to or will address it as he recommends.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa45bce64)