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Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it is still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
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Home Game: An Accidental Guide to Fatherhood Paperback – April 2, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 190 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 Reprint edition (April 2, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780393338096
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393338096
  • ASIN: 0393338096
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (127 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #425,727 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

After the birth of his first child, bestselling writer Lewis (Moneyball) felt he was a stranger in a strange land, puzzled at the gap between what he thought he should be feeling and what he actually felt. While he expected to be overcome by joy, he often felt puzzled; expecting to feel worried over a child's illness or behavior, he often felt indifferent. Lewis attempts to capture the triumphs, failures, humor, frustration and exhilaration of being a new father during the first year of each of his three children's lives. In one especially hilarious moment, Lewis is in a hotel pool in Bermuda distantly observing his children. When some older boys start teasing his oldest daughter, the youngest daughter, three years old at the time, lets fly a string of profanities at the top of her lungs. The boys retreat and then regroup for a second attack; when they return, she lets fly another string and tells them that she has peed in the pool, causing the boys to go away. All the while, Lewis watches from afar, too embarrassed to claim this youngster as his own but also proud that she has handled herself so smartly. Although Lewis is correct that his fatherhood moments might be more interesting to him than to anyone else, his reflections capture both the unease and the excitement that fatherhood brings. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

“Brief, clever and frank—a good gift for Father’s Day.” (Kirkus Reviews)

“Funny, frank, and engaging. It’s refreshing to hear a dad describe so vividly the uglier aspects of the job.” (Los Angeles Times)

“His failings amuse . . . and he captures serious moments with a warmth that shows he’s a pretty good dad after all.” (People)

More About the Author

Michael Lewis, the author of Boomerang, Liar's Poker, The New New Thing, Moneyball, The Blind Side, Panic, Home Game and The Big Short, among other works, lives in Berkeley, California, with his wife, Tabitha Soren, and their three children.

Customer Reviews

This is one of the funniest books I've read.
B. Johnson
In summary, I found this book to a quick and enjoyable read, and I highly recommend it.
val321
To enjoy this book you have to understand Michael Lewis' sense of humor.
Jeff

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

91 of 100 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey T. Vogel on May 18, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I have often said that being a father is both the best thing and the hardest thing I've ever done. This book parlays much of this ideal in a humorous way that should appeal to both new and old father's alike. The introduction had me laughing uncontrollably to which my wife asked what got my goat and so I read to her the highlights. However, as I continued to read I began to realize that women, or at least my wife, should avoid this book because it does delve into the male mindset enough to make me hide my copy for fear that my she might begin to see some of the absurdities of fatherhood. With that, every dad should read this book because it takes a very funny approach for many of the steps within early fatherhood (births, hospitals, children's minds, vasectomies, the woman who really runs the show, and so forth). As the father of three young children I keep thinking that one day I'll truly be appreciated by my wife and kids, but as Michael Lewis demonstrates, we are mere bystanders in our own lives. With this knowledge, I think the author points out with the birth of his son (Walker) that we get what we invest in our relationships and even though we are mentally and physically exhausted each day, we must find humor and strength for the fleeting time that is fatherhood.
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By B. Johnson on June 10, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
First of all, I'm a huge fan of Michael Lewis. So be warned that I might be a little bit biased. I've read just about everything he's written - Moneyball, The Blind Side, Liar's Poker, Next, The New New Thing, his articles in Portfolio, etc. I really enjoy his style, humor, and the way he brings the human element into the stories he tells.

This is one of the funniest books I've read. It's a short book (I read it on a cross-country flight with plenty of time to spare) but it's hilarious. I was literally laughing out loud and had tears from laughing so hard a few times. Was it as interesting as the stories about football or baseball from The Blind Side or Moneyball? Probably not. Was it as entertaining or more? Absolutely.

Some of the other reviewers are put off because Lewis has a nanny or has had a very successful career. Does that bother me? No. Others think he whines. I disagree. He's telling funny stories. If you want to read some funny stories and can deal with (or enjoy) some sarcasm and wit along the way, you'll enjoy this book. If you will be upset because he has a nanny, then don't read the book.

This book is entertaining. It's funny. It's not a how to guide for parenting. I don't think he wrote it to gain sympathy for the challenges he's faced. He obviously enjoys writing, enjoys the income it provides for him and his family, enjoys sharing this with others, and enjoys entertaining. If you want to be entertained by some stories about his family, you'll enjoy it. If you are looking for an author to relate to and sympathize with, maybe this isn't for you.

Highly recommended for the entertainment and humor.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A. Ross HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 4, 2009
Format: Hardcover
It's kind of interesting that two excellent Berkeley-based writers named Michael both happened to come out with a book of ruminations on modern fatherhood (and its corollary, manhood) within a few months of each other. Since we added a second child to our own household a few months ago, and I'm now on (unpaid) leave to take care of him for a few months, this struck me as a good time to check out what two writers I greatly respect have to say on my current profession. (The other book is Michael Chabon's Manhood for Amateurs). To a certain extent, both authors grapple with the state that Lewis articles in his introduction: "Obviously, we're in the midst of some long unhappy transition between the model of fatherhood as practiced by my father and some ideal model."

Unfortunately, Lewis has set such a high bar with his past books (Liar's Poker, Moneyball, and The Blind Side), that this loosely assembled patchwork of journal entries and Slate.com essays ends up being a total disappointment. It's kind of stunning to me that someone with his powers of both analysis and storytelling managed to say absolutely nothing interesting, provocative, or even amusing about being a father in this new age of fatherhood. Instead, he paints himself in the usual self-deprecating colors of progressive fatherhood -- ever the bumbling idiot, an object of dismissive scorn by his partner, etc.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D. Morrison on September 20, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Why was this published in hardback?

There is nothing new to learn in this collection of stories. Tired comedy from familiar anecdotes. Paul Reiser wrote a book about 10 years ago and it's similar but funnier. The ill-equipped Dad stumbling through the early years of childhood/parenthood is scorched earth in that it's been explored and exploited. This offers nothing new or no real insights. It's not even that humorous, just vanilla all the way through, I like vanilla but not in hard-back.
It's written well enough and because of that it lulled me into a pointless journey. The smugness of his celebrity as a writer really annoyed me. It's never spelled out but there's just this sense that fatherhood is an experiment and this memoir is just a literary exercise until something more interesting comes along. I'm just not invested in him as a character. I wonder why anyone close to him thought that this was worth publishing? Does his name and excellence in his craft make his personal life interesting? Not to me.
But, who am I? No one really. He wrote and finished a book, that alone is worth 2 stars. I think I got 400 points for spelling my name correctly on my SAT tests.
Maybe new Dads will like it and maybe I expected too much.
My advice, buy it used.
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