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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I lost everything in the mortgage crash!
I was not a major real estate investor, just an average homeowner, but I had a "friend" who was a mortgage broker for Countrywide. He kept pushing me into (what I know now were) increasingly worse loans. At the top of the market he came to me with an income property that was such a great deal that if I didn't jump on it he was going to buy it himself (and I believed...
Published on May 7, 2010 by Claire Jordan

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars buyer beware of buying the $2.39 kindle edition
Good book so far, but mainly wanted to warn people that the seller is selling just the introduction and the first chapter for $2.39. I was surprised at the price, thinking it was for the whole book, and clicked on it away. My mistake. The book stops at the end of page 19, at the end of the first chapter. Amazon was gracious enough to quickly give a refund, so that I...
Published on September 21, 2010 by corynthian22


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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I lost everything in the mortgage crash!, May 7, 2010
This review is from: Homebuyers Beware: Who¿s Ripping You Off Now?--What You Must Know About the New Rules of Mortgage and Credit (Paperback)
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I was not a major real estate investor, just an average homeowner, but I had a "friend" who was a mortgage broker for Countrywide. He kept pushing me into (what I know now were) increasingly worse loans. At the top of the market he came to me with an income property that was such a great deal that if I didn't jump on it he was going to buy it himself (and I believed that? What a sucker!) I didn't listen to my inner voice which kept telling me that none of this added up. Instead I deferred to him because I thought he was an "expert" who knew so much more than me (turns out he didn't even have a high school diploma and had only been selling mortgages for 6 months when I met him... before that he sold used cars!) I also thought that he had my best interest at heart, when, in fact, the only thing he cared about was his commissions.

I'm currently in a short-sale on that investment property: it's in escrow for 1/3(!!) of what I paid for it and we were lucky to get that. My home was foreclosed on a year ago. Thirty years of excellent credit is destroyed. I'm not blaming the mortgage broker, I could have rejected any of his offers. I was just under-educated about how real estate mortgages REALLY work, but not anymore.

As I read this book, it was like reading a postmortem of my financial situation. I cannot tell you how many times while reading it I shouted, "That Bastard! That's exactly what he did to me!" As I dissected my mistakes and the ways in which I was conned, and learned how to avoid similar traps in the future, I began to feel as though I might actually have some hope of fixing this mess and restoring my good credit and, perhaps, even owning property again someday.

But even if I don't ever buy another piece of real estate, I'm glad I read this book because now at least I understand what happened to me (and to so many otherwise well-educated, successful people,) and I don't feel like such a complete failure anymore. In that regard, this book is better (and way cheaper,) than therapy.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book will save you many,many times the price you pay for it, November 20, 2009
By 
Temujin53 (Rancho Cucamonga,CA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Homebuyers Beware: Who¿s Ripping You Off Now?--What You Must Know About the New Rules of Mortgage and Credit (Paperback)
As a small businessman and even smaller real estate investor,a licensed R.E.Broker and General Contractor,I wholeheartedly recommend Homebuyers Beware to all home buyers,first timers and seasoned investors alike.

I read Carolyn Warren's first book,Mortgage Rip-Offs,a few months ago and liked it so much I contacted her for consultation re:refinancing of my properties.Eventhough I bought my first home over 30 years ago and many since,I must confess I know NOTHING about yield spread premium and the way brokers/lenders use YSP to add income to themself before reading that book.The YSP information alone was worth thousand times the cost of the book(approx.$13 from AMAZON.COM)because I know absolutely, definitely that the brokers' additional income must come only from one source : borrowers like you and me.

There were other important information for ALL mortgage seekers in the first book :how to negotiate for lower fees and rates,whether to pay point,how and what to do with junk fees etc.All those and more were explained and clarified further in Carolyn's second book,Homebuyers Beware.

In her new book,Carolyn takes her readers to the real estate mortgage market situation today.This is most important due to the fact that rules for qualifying for new and refi mortgages changed substantially in the last 2 years it's like we're looking at 2 different creatures altogather :

---no more easy no loan docs. loan,no more easy qualifying loans
---good credit is a must.So are substantial down payment required in most cases
---W-2,income tax returns and bank staments are all standard required docs.
---etc.,etc

Carolyn explained all of the above in practical details,with intended benefit for the consumers.Even for readers who've no credit,with bankruptcy/shortsale in their credit report or who want to repudiate bad info. in his/her credit files.The book is,like her first book,very easy to read and full of helpfull pointers that can be used to save unnecessary fees/chrges made by lenders/brokers.

This book will save you many,many times the price you pay for it.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Read to Understand Mortgages and Credit, March 18, 2011
This review is from: Homebuyers Beware: Who¿s Ripping You Off Now?--What You Must Know About the New Rules of Mortgage and Credit (Paperback)
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We are a financially illiterate nation. No one book can be all things to all people; however, this book will go a long way in ensuring readers of this literary gem tackle the challenge of understanding credit and mortgages. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was an easy read that only took a few hours to complete and yet it gave a comprehensive overview of credit and the mortgage process. The author articulated in an honest and straightforward manner the right and the wrong way to do business based on what she has seen from both perspectives in her time in the industry working for both the big boys in the industry and smaller players.

As someone who has spent many hours studying and teaching about credit and mortgages, I feel the reader will walk away better for having invested the time in reading this book and I will not hesitate in recommending it to others. I can confidently say that this book will clearly pay for itself as any of the multiple solid strategies mentioned for improving one's credit, finding the right professional and negotiating away junk mortgage fees will far exceed the cost of this book. Credit and mortgages are not easy topics to tackle; particularly concisely within the confines of a book. However, the author does an effective job in really hitting most of the key issues.

I think the format of the book facilitates moving through a lot of material in a coherent manner. There are 30 brief chapters grouped in a logical sequence and the "What's Coming Next" chapter endings are a nice touch and smooth out the transitions.

About the first quarter of the book is devoted to credit. This includes a discussion of how it is measured and how to improve one's credit score. This section includes a nice discussion of credit myths and practical action steps and examples of how to fix one's credit. This is all solid information that everyone (including those not even shopping for a mortgage) needs to know.

I also like that later in the book (chapter 20) she takes the time to mention the importance of hiring a buyer's broker. This is the one thing about the real estate industry that always makes me wonder. Here we have people engaged in what for most will be their major lifetime purchase and it is the one area of business where we have the same agent often representing both sides of the transaction simultaneously. This is insanity. Heed the author's advice and always hire a buyer's broker!

I like the insider's perspective on working for banks vs. the independent mortgage broker. This is the behind the scenes stuff that most consumers don't understand or take the time to appreciate. The challenge with this is the banks and their strong lobbyists can pressure Congress to regulate the independent folks out of business and this means less competition and higher prices.

Each chapter has nuggets of great information; however, my favorite chapters are in the middle of the book and are truly the heart of the book and the wealth of information:

Carolyn's Ten Step Loan Process Checklist (Chapter 10) offers a complete and chronological list of what you should do and when you should do it.

An overview of the dreaded Yield Spread Premium (YSP) (Chapters 15 and 16) is covered . If you do not know what this is (as my guess is the case with most people getting a mortgage) then you really need to read this book.

The Good Faith Estimate (GFE) Tricks and Traps (Chapter 17) lets you know what to look for in the GFE and where the junk fees pop up. The author does a great job dissecting this form and showing both the old and the newer HUD version of what to expect with fees and what is normal and what is junk. In the process, letting you know what questions to ask.

What Does it Take to Get Approved (Chapter 19) is self explanatory and important for people to understand before they get started in the process.

If the author reads these reviews, I do have five suggestions to improve an already stellar work. Look, I might be nitpicking and asking too much as this book already packs a ton of information into a small package. However, if I had a dream list, I think addressing these five areas would be it:

First, the author is clearly a proponent of paying off one's mortgage early and owning a home free and clear and makes the case for a 15-year mortgage and goes as far to mention it is one of her favorite products. While I agree this is appropriate for some, this may be the only thing I read that I tend to disagree with. The 30-year mortgage has a variety of benefits for a variety of reasons. I understand the arguments for each; however, I feel a brief section outlining the pros and cons of a 15-year vs. 30-year mortgage would be appropriate and fit well with the concepts developed throughout the book.

Look, with rates historically low and currently in the mid fours for someone with stellar credit and the required down payment, this makes even more sense. I simply like the 30-year product better; particularly for someone who knows they will be in their home for life. This just comes down to the time value of money and running scenarios with a financial calculator. There is an opportunity cost to paying off one's mortgage early. That is funds that can be invested elsewhere. Based on our budget deficits and debt, we will have inflation in the future and having a fixed rate in the mid fours a couple of decades from now is appealing and will seem like nothing and there will likely be many low risk investment products offering a higher yield. Plus, I don't like giving up the tax deductibility of mortgage interest by paying off a loan 15 years early. The author jokes that one can make a donation to their favorite charity to take advantage of tax deductions; (a nice suggestion by the way for other reasons as there are plenty of noble causes) however, mutually exclusive of the issue at hand. Finally, while I acknowledge there are interest savings with the 15-year product over the 30 year (both with the lower rate and faster amortization), one can always get a 30-year mortgage and change their mind and pay off the loan early with no additional costs based on their life situation. Conversely, the cost of changing one's mind and wanting to go from a 15-year mortgage to a 30-year mortgage can be considerable; particularly if refinancing is not an option because of being upside down (25% of the country is underwater right now...75% in the states of AZ and NV) or suffering a job loss. There are other reasons as well; however, you get the idea. I just think that many people who qualify for a 15-year mortgage and who look at an amortization schedule opt for the 15-year loan and the apparent interest savings without evaluating all of the other moving parts based on their particular life situation.

Second, the author mentions equity acceleration programs both in a section towards the end and in an anecdote at the beginning of the book. While she does a good job warning the reader about the many charlatans selling these products, this section can be expanded simply because many of the people selling these really engage in egregious marketing ploys by only mentioning the positive attributes of these plans. These go by many names including Australian and Green mortgages and have really been marketed aggressively (particularly in the mid-Atlantic states) the past few years. As the author states, these sound too good to be true for a reason; however, this can be elaborated on with some key disadvantages that need to be highlighted. First, these mortgages are often considered revolving debt (not the installment debt that the vast majority of traditional mortgage products are) and that small nuance will literally destroy someone's credit score. In addition, there is an issue with many of these products technically not being origination debt and thus ultimately not being fully eligible for the mortgage interest rate deduction if the IRS puts its foot down with a strict interpretation of the law.

Third, the author talks about discount points in a few areas of the book; however, novice readers might be left not understanding when it makes sense to pay these. While it is tough to know the exact break-even point without the mastery of a financial calculator and an accurate forecast of how long one will be in the home, it could be emphasized that paying discount points, or prepaid interest, does not make sense if one does not plan to remain in the home for many years.

Fourth, I think more time can be spent explaining the difference between a conventional / conforming loan and a jumbo loan. I know this is complex since the old $417,000 limit is now a sliding scale based on location. The author even references a website to illustrate this point. Plus, the premium in the spread for jumbo loans has varied so much from 2007 to 2011; however, the reader would benefit from a little more overview of this topic.

Finally, I think the reader would benefit from a detailed discussion of PMI.

I am really nitpicking with the above five recommendations as the author did a phenomenal job of summarizing the complex topics of credit and mortgages and it is impossible to hit on everything.

My main fear is response to what played out in the early 2000s will be an overshoot by the government and we will see much bad regulation to go along with the good that should have been in place to begin with. To illustrate this, the author makes mention of the Home Value Code of Conduct and the asinine result it has had on the appraisal process. It is just unsettling what we might see come from new regulation / regulators and the likes of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Washington, please think through very carefully what you do!

While Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are train wrecks that were poorly run, I fear what happens if they are eliminated all together in the next few years. I just don't know if the private sector can be relied on to buy mortgage debt. Comments by some of the prospective buyers of this debt, like Bill Gross in recent days, make me fear what risk premium will be built into mortgages in the future. The good news is hopefully we will have Carolyn Warren on our side with an updated edition of this book to deal with this changing landscape.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars buyer beware of buying the $2.39 kindle edition, September 21, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Homebuyers Beware: Who¿s Ripping You Off Now?--What You Must Know About the New Rules of Mortgage and Credit (Paperback)
Good book so far, but mainly wanted to warn people that the seller is selling just the introduction and the first chapter for $2.39. I was surprised at the price, thinking it was for the whole book, and clicked on it away. My mistake. The book stops at the end of page 19, at the end of the first chapter. Amazon was gracious enough to quickly give a refund, so that I could buy the whole book. However, this practice doesn't make sense to me. Who sells their introduction and their first chapter for 25% (including tax) of the price of the book, and especially when there is a free kindle download of the introduction? You're paying 25% of the price of the book for pages 7-19, which comes out to around 5% of the book. It's like watching 5 minutes of a movie and paying $2.50 on a movie ticket priced at $10. What is the seller thinking?
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Homebuyers Beware, November 2, 2009
By 
As a student of business finance for over 40 years, I've been in the trenches of real estate and Mortgage lending for over 25 years. I assure you that my assessment of the latest block busting book on fraud and duplicity in this industry is this:

If you are planning to buy a home or refinance your current mortgage, you must heed Carolyn Warren's "Homebuyers Beware".......
Avoid unscrupulous banks, brokers and lenders of all kinds. YES, UNSCRUPULOUS loan officers still lurk in the brick and morar of those behemoth lending institutions, the BANKS!!!!! Find out what their tricks are. You need to read, NO, study this easy to read guide to stress free engagement of this industry. Do NOT, and think of this: would you jump out of an airplane without a parachute ???

Wether it's finding the lowest cost loan,improving your credit score for the lowest rate, homebuyer guidance or avoiding mortgage fraud and scams, Carolyn Warren has given Main Street how to navigate these tracherous waters.

Buy it !!! Try it !!! Fly with it !!! And you won't kick yourself for "being in it, to win it".
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I had no idea!, June 4, 2010
By 
This review is from: Homebuyers Beware: Who¿s Ripping You Off Now?--What You Must Know About the New Rules of Mortgage and Credit (Paperback)
Carolyn Warren's "Homebuyers Beware" book is full of useful, eye-opening information and tips. I purchased it because of a recommendation I saw in a newspaper and, since I'm preparing to buy a house, I thought it'd be a nice read since I'm tired of staring at the computer and doing internet searches for information. Her suggestions concerning getting a Good Faith Estimate up-front, asking Escrow companies about "email fees" (4 of the 5 I've asked do have that), and managing your credit score were wonderful advice. I definitely recommend this book if you are in the market to purchase or refinance a new property! Don't even call for a pre-approval before reading this!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Your house may still be your largest investment..., January 14, 2010
By 
Ardeal "Emi" (Atlanta, GA United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Homebuyers Beware: Who¿s Ripping You Off Now?--What You Must Know About the New Rules of Mortgage and Credit (Paperback)
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... unless you get ready for kids in college. But even then, who can say they can afford to skip on potential thousands of Dollars because they were not informed regarding their mortgage? This book provides the latest and greatest regarding your loan - including tactics used to get one to pay more. It gives practical examples, analyzes various topics among its 30 chapters, topics such as credit, lower cost loans, fraud and scams, etc. Do the simple math - it may take a few hours to read this book, but if you divide the savings by the few hours, you'll realize that you may never save that much money in a few hours. Definitely get this book if you plan on buying a home or just refinancing.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A lot of great info - but some is absolutely incorrect, December 7, 2009
By 
This review is from: Homebuyers Beware: Who¿s Ripping You Off Now?--What You Must Know About the New Rules of Mortgage and Credit (Paperback)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
While this book is a great "primer course" for the potential home buyer...buyer beware with the book itself. There is a plethora of information regarding the loans, fees, terms, etc. However, some of it is just plain incorrect.

For example:
1. Page 77, where the author describes if you're ready to buy a home. Point #5, explaining why it might not be a good time to buy a house: "The only zero-down loan is for U.S. Veterans. Everyone else will need at least 3.5 percent (of the purchase price) to put down."
This is wrong. There is no requirement that lenders have to abide by, telling them the minimum is 3.5%. That's just for FHA loans anyway. In fact, there is a "rural" homebuyer program, called the USDA loan that features 0% down. And, if you take a look at credit unions, many of them do not require ANYTHING down. Of course, the interest rate will be higher since it's a higher risk, but researching a local community credit union - they offer a 0% down that also does not require mortgage insurance. Is that the recommended way to go? It depends on your finances and scenario, but "the only zero-down loan is for U.S. Veterans" is absolutely wrong.

2. Page 79, under the "Folly of Procrastination": "Owning is better than renting in the long run. People who own their homes free and clear in their retirement years are taking Mediterranean cruises and enjoying life. By contract, people who are renting in their retirement years are paying more than ever and are taking supplemental jobs slinging hot fries and sweeping greasy floors to try to make ends meet."
This may be tongue in cheek, but it's also wrong. Many elderly are choosing to rent - many for financial reasons. You never really "own" your house - you merely rent it from the government due to property taxes. And, with owning, you get all the pleasures of upkeep. There are numerous reasons, personal and financial to rent rather than own. Here, the author comes off as an over-zealous real estate agent. (You know, part of the National Association of Realtors, who, each quarter, tell us that "Housing prices are on the rebound." It's December 2009, and I've heard that for over a year now, folks. They're still dropping.)

3. Page 82, "The Loan Process in Ten Easy Steps": "Don't make the colossal mistake of getting out on limb with a signed purchase and sale agreement without having solid financial backing to close the deal."
Another blanket statement that could be entirely wrong. Get your pre-qualification (your credit won't be run), make an offer, have an inspection, and THEN go back for the preapproval. Why? If you're actually looking for "THE" house - a tidy 1800sqft house with man-cave sitting on 2 acres with a couple large bedrooms and the third one can be small since it'll be an office, etc... The chances of you finding your perfect house are pretty narrow. And when you do find the house, if the home inspection turns up all kinds of stuff you'd rather not deal with (by renegotiating price or fixing yourself)...then 3 months from then when you find the "replacement" perfect house, you can do the same steps. Otherwise, every 3 months that go by, you get your credit run...and your score drops each time. (On the other hand, if you're looking for "a box to call your own, something with 3 bedrooms, bathroom, and a kitchen," then there are plenty out there - shouldn't be too hard to find one in 3 months.)

4. Page 82: "Don't even think about presenting an offer without having a preapproval letter to accompany it."
I've done this 3 times. Each time, the offer was accepted. A good real estate agent knows that in the Purchase & Sale, to put a "Contingent on Financing" clause. If somebody wants to sell their house, and you have a good offer, they can conditionally approve the offer - stating that you have 5 days to produce a PreApproval letter. This isn't 2003-2007 when people were lining up to bid on overpriced, cheaply built homes.

5. Page 83: "If you're buying a bank-owned property, it takes longer because you're dealing with a committee or bank negotiator who is busy with other matters."
Another glossy smooth-over by the author. Just recently I made an offer on a bank-owned property. My real estate agent had the offer in at 7am on Monday. The offer was approved at 4pm...THE SAME DAY.

6. Page 100: "What about Credit Unions?"
Here, the author basically says to use banks and not credit unions...but more directly, she states to choose your loan based on the individual loan officer rather than lending institution.
Well, first off, there are a nationwide survey of mortgages originated in the past couple years (I believe it was performed by BankRate.) Credit unions routinely not only had better rates, but their customers were happier with their service. But...the authors bit here is two-fold: dismissing credit unions and choosing a loan individual...

7. Page 106-108. "How to find a mortgage star."
This part is just downright worthless. Basically, the author says to pick a great mortgage individual, do the following: (1) Pick somebody, anybody. (2) Call them up and ask for a GFE (good faith estimate.) (3) If they want to run your credit, they're bad. If they say the GFE doesn't mean much, they're bad. (4) "Then go one step further and ask about their experience and ability to handle challenges, should something unexpected come up."
Based off that, you've found your mortgage star. Seems a little iffy to me...

8. Chapter 14. The author continuously talks about the people who are "shoplifting" the knowledge of a loan officer. "It's sad, but they [loan officers] get so many people asking for quotes and GFEs and asking ten stupid questions before they even have a loan approved that take up their whole day and then these rude time shoplifters never get back to them, disappearing into the silent void without so much as a thank you, so the loan officers end up working hours and hours for free every week."
Excuse me...but that's called CUSTOMER SERVICE. Do you pay the dude at Best Buy (or Amazon) to ask about the latest BluRay player? Are you shoplifting if you don't buy one? No - if you were happy with the experience (ie, the customer service), you get your questions answered, and when ready, you buy from them.

Overall, there's a lot to both like and dislike about this book. The best thing about it: there's a lot of good information all bound into a single source. The worst things: some things stated as facts that aren't true, and, quite frankly, you could skip the narrative and get all the info for free online. Just do your own homework.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You must read this book if you are getting a mortgage, July 5, 2012
By 
Philip L. Shen (Newport Beach, CA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Homebuyers Beware: Who¿s Ripping You Off Now?--What You Must Know About the New Rules of Mortgage and Credit (Paperback)
The mortgage business has always been a black box to me. I know money is being made, and I am OK with that. But, I am NOT OK with egregious sums based on dishonest practices. I have always been suspicious of the industry as it has historically not been transparent. I have a few investment properties and believe I have been cheated in the past in spite of reading a few books on the topic and having good credit. In preparation for my latest real estate purchase, I decided to really get to the heart of understanding of how this business works.

I stumbled upon Mortgage Rip-Offs and Money Savers on Amazon. I read through it in a couple of days, and it was awesome! This book gives you an inside look into the mortgage industry and all the tricks of the trade. Importantly, Carolyn provides readers a road map for the process and an understanding of all the jargon, so loan officers know they're working with someone who understands their business. After Mortgage Rip-Offs, I found out that she wrote Homebuyers Beware. I got that immediately and read that in a day. This book explains yield spread premium in greater detail so you can understand the nuances better. I highly recommend reading both books. I also recommend using her GFE review service. Go to[...]. I spent $55 and 30 min on the phone with her today to review 3 GFEs, and she gave me great advice. Read these books, and you'll have confidence when dealing with loan officers and will likely save yourself a bunch of money in the process!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must read for Homebuyers, July 29, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Homebuyers Beware: Who¿s Ripping You Off Now?--What You Must Know About the New Rules of Mortgage and Credit (Paperback)
Great book. I am in the financial services field, and am aware of many financial rip offs, but there were things in this book I was not even aware of. I borrowed both of Carolyn's books at first from someone I knew and after finishing the first couple chapters of both books I subsequently bought both of them. There was just so much information in them, I wanted to add them to my personal library of reference books

Thanks for the information and helping protect the consumer against rip offs.
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Homebuyers Beware: Who¿s Ripping You Off Now?--What You Must Know About the New Rules of Mortgage and Credit
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