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Homechild Paperback – May 15, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Talonbooks; 1 edition (May 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0889225826
  • ISBN-13: 978-0889225824
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,795,481 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“MacLeod has written a moving story of huge implications—what family, identity and personal history mean.”
CBC

About the Author

Joan MacLeod
Multiple Betty Mitchell, Chalmer’s, Dora and Governor General’s Award-winning author Joan MacLeod grew up in North Vancouver.

Now an internationally celebrated star of the world of the theatre, MacLeod developed her finely honed playwriting skills during seven seasons as playwright-in-residence at the Tarragon Theatre in Toronto, and turned her hand to opera with her libretto for The Secret Garden, which won a Dora Award.

In 1991, her play Amigo’s Blue Guitar won the Governor General’s Drama Award.

More About the Author

Multiple Betty Mitchell, Chalmer's, Dora and Governor General's Award-winning author Joan MacLeod grew up in North Vancouver and studied Creative Writing at the University of Victoria and the University of British Columbia.

Now an internationally celebrated star of the world of the theatre, MacLeod developed her finely honed playwriting skills during seven seasons as playwright-in-residence at the Tarragon Theatre in Toronto, and turned her hand to opera with her libretto for The Secret Garden, which won a Dora Award.

She has had many radio dramas produced by CBC Stereo Theatre, including Hand of God, a one-hour drama adapted from her play Jewel, and has written numerous scripts for film and television productions.

Translated into eight languages, her work has been extensively produced around the world. Multiple simultaneous productions of her hit play The Shape of a Girl toured internationally for four years, including a sold-out run in New York. Her play Amigo's Blue Guitar won the 1991 Governor General's Drama Award. Her Governor General's Award nominations include one in 1996 for The Hope Slide / Little Sister and one in 2009 for Another Home Invasion.

MacLeod also writes prose and poetry, which has been published in a wide variety of literary journals.

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Format: Paperback
In 1922, Katie and Jackie are wed to an ignominious history, the officially sanctioned migration of children from Briton to Canada, over eighty-thousand children displaced between 1860 and 1930. Often separated from parents and siblings for years- if not permanently- such unfortunates are transported to Canadian factories and farms, virtually indentured servants. In the first scene, we meet six-year-old Katie, alone, waiting for her brother to send word of his arrival in Canada, believing that if she is patient enough he will come back for her. In present day, Alistair, in his eighties, inhabits a dilapidated Canadian farm house that has seen better days, cared for by his sister-in-law, Flora, since his wife's death ten years earlier. Alistair hasn't shared his early trauma with his family, refuses to speak about the past. Only next-door neighbor, Dorrie, knows of the pain they endured, herself a victim of the same migration of children.

Other characters round out our perspective: Alistair's children, Ewan and Leona, his daughter currently visiting from Toronto; and Dorrie's son, Wesley, Lorna's former school-mate. It is clear that Lorna is uncomfortable returning to her home and her father's influence, a taciturn man who shows no overt affection for his children, who in turn expect little from him. A loose-knit family reunion has been organized for Lorna's homecoming, family members settling into their natural roles as the play progresses: Lorna, a daughter who finds she can't go home again, stung by her father's harsh judgments; Flora, trying to make peace while subtly controlling the course of events' and Dorrie, ever-tentative since her arrival in Canada as a child, lovingly supported by her twice-divorced, live-in son, Wesley.
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