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  • Homefront Collection (Irving Berlin's This Is the Army / Thank Your Lucky Stars / Hollywood Canteen)
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Homefront Collection (Irving Berlin's This Is the Army / Thank Your Lucky Stars / Hollywood Canteen)


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Frequently Bought Together

Homefront Collection (Irving Berlin's This Is the Army / Thank Your Lucky Stars / Hollywood Canteen) + Stage Door Canteen (1943) + Private Buckaroo
Price for all three: $30.79

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  • Stage Door Canteen (1943) $9.99
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Product Details

  • Actors: Irving Berlin, George Murphy, Ronald Reagan, Joan Leslie, Bette Davis
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Box set, Black & White, Full Screen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 1.0)
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: November 11, 2008
  • Run Time: 518 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001D7T44C
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #20,792 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Homefront Collection (Irving Berlin's This Is the Army / Thank Your Lucky Stars / Hollywood Canteen)" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Includes:
  • Irving Berlin's This Is the Army (1943)
  • Steven Spielberg narrates the new documentary Warner at War
  • Commentary by Joan Leslie and historian Drew Casper
  • "My British Buddy": musical number not seen in North American theaters
  • Overture and exit music rejoined to the film for the first time in 65 years
  • Vintage newsreel
  • Musical short The United States Army Band
  • Classic cartoon Confusions of a Nutsy Spy
  • Trailers
  • Thank Your Lucky Stars (1943)
  • Musical shorts Three Cheers for the Girls and The United States Navy Band
  • Patriotic short Food and Magic
  • Classic cartoon Fallen Hare
  • Audio-only bonus: Radio-show adaptation with the film's stars
  • Hollywood Canteen (1944)
  • Patriotic shorts I am an American, Proudly We Serve, and Report from the Front
  • Classic cartoons Herr Meets Hare, Hollywood Canine Canteen, and Stage Door Cartoon

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

"War is pretty grim business," an officer states in This is the Army, one of three (literally) star-spangled World War II-era musicals included in this rousing set. "Sometimes a song or a smile is just as vital to an army as food." It was also essential to those on the homefront, and Warner Bros. obliged with these proudly patriotic extravaganzas in which the studios' A-list talents sing, dance, poke fun at themselves, and most important, offer their heartfelt support of the soldiers fighting overseas. Boy, as the ads for That's Entertainment once proclaimed, do we need it now. "Wherever you go, our hearts go with you," Bette Davis movingly states at the end of Hollywood Canteen (1944), a salute to the famed club she co-founded where soldiers mingle with the movies' best and brightest, who entertain and serve as the wait staff. Robert Hutton stars as a wide-eyed soldier with a mad crush on Joan Leslie. At the club, a "Reaganized" Jane Wyman shows him the ropes, Barbara Stanwyck serves him food, and Paul Henreid dispenses romantic advice to his lovelorn buddy, while onstage the likes of Jack Benny, Eddie Cantor, Roy Rogers and Trigger, and others perform. Cantor gets the good sport medal for Thank Your Lucky Stars (1943), in which he portrays himself as an egomaniacal ham as well as an aspiring entertainer whose resemblance to the real Cantor has stymied his career. The heart of the film is a benefit show. If you've always wanted to see Bette Davis or Errol Flynn sing and dance, then "That's What You Jolly Well Get" (just one of the showstopping numbers). Great comic character actors abound, including Edward Everett Horton and chubby cheeked S.Z. Sakall, who, in one cute bit, intimidates tough guy Humphrey Bogart. Michael Curtiz's This is the Army, the top-grossing film of 1943, is a class act all the way, with an Oscar-winning score and great Irving Berlin tunes, including Kate Smith's defining performance of "God Bless America" (Berlin himself makes a rare screen appearance to sing, "Oh, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning"). George Murphy and Ronald Reagan front the cast as father and son soldiers, who, in World Wars I and II, respectively, mount morale-building stage shows. Each disc replicates an old fashioned night at the movies, complete with coming attraction, newsreel, vintage short subjects, and classic cartoons. The This is the Army disc contains a 45-min. documentary about Warner Bros.' war effort narrated by Steven Spielberg, and delightful, all-too-brief commentary by Joan Leslie, who is in all three films (the bulk of the detailed and incisive commentary is by U.S.C. professor Dr. Drew Casper). Whether as tribute to "the Greatest Generation" or as nostalgia for vintage movie buffs, this collection is a (Yankee doodle) dandy! --Donald Liebenson

Product Description

Three Disc collection features a trio of films that captured the spirit of America during World War II: "HOLLYWOOD CANTEEN" was a club for GIs where Joan Crawford might over-easy you some eggs and John Garfield might scrub out the frying pan. The movie Hollywood Canteen is a snappy, starry salute to that World War II landmark. "THANK YOUR LUCKY STARS" Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Errol Flynn, and Dinah Shore come out to play in this breezy, behind-the-Hollywood-scenes story about young talents hoping for a big break. "THIS IS THE ARMY" From immigrant lad to All-American success story, Irving Berlin showed his abiding love for his adopted country with, among other cultural accomplishments, decades of Broadway hits, the unofficial national anthem God Bless America and the World War II spirit-lifter This Is the Army. On stage it featured 350 real-life GIs, giving their singing-and- dancing all to raise nearly $2 million (then an astronomical sum) for Army Emergency Relief.

Customer Reviews

No special effects, no foul language and good scripts.
Herb Stark
Warner Bros did right by these movies and, if you're at all interested in WWII-era movies, this is definitely worth the purchase.
Archer1941
All I know is I never saw anyone move their eyes like that before.
R. Deniston

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By calvinnme HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 3, 2008
Format: DVD
These are three musical comedies from the WWII era. It's been some time since I've seen "This is the Army". I've seen the other two pretty recently. I intersperse the press releases with my own remarks.

This is the Army (1942)
Press release:
Irving Berlin showed his abiding love for his adopted country with, among other cultural accomplishments, decades of Broadway hits, the unofficial national anthem "God Bless America" and the World War II spirit-lifter This Is the Army. On stage it featured 350 real-life GIs, giving their singing-and- dancing all to raise nearly $2 million (then an astronomical sum) for Army Emergency Relief.
My remarks:
Irving Berlin actually sings in this one - and not too well. According to one story, after Berlin sang "Oh How I Hate To Get Up In The Morning", one stagehand was overheard saying to another, "If the guy who wrote that could've heard how this guy just sang that song, he'd roll over in his grave." I got this story from someone over at imdb, but I can believe it happened. Great music, but a rather weak storyline. However, you have to remember at this point it was early in the war and the outcome was yet unknown. With everything on the line, people needed this kind of escapist entertainment.

Thank Your Lucky Stars (1943)
Press Release:
Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Errol Flynn, and Dinah Shore come out to play in the joyous World War II-era Thank Your Lucky Stars. A breezy, behind-the-Hollywood-scenes story about young talents hoping for a big break glitters with specialty numbers featuring Golden Era greats.
My remarks:
The best of the three films in the bunch, this film does something that nothing else on DVD does to my knowledge - gives us a large dose of Eddie Cantor.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By G. Cohen on December 21, 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I was previously familiar with the three films featured in the "Warner Bros. and the Homefront Collection". My reason for the purchase was to add a high quality DVD set that represented the Warners studio contract players during the height of the studio system. " Thank your Lucky Stars" {particularly Bette Davis singing her wartime lament, "They're Either too Young or too Old") and "Hollywood Canteen" were beautifully transferred to the DVD format. "This is the Army", the only movie in color, was a great disappointment. The picture was lacking in detail and the color was too brightly saturated and inaccurate. Surely, Warners can do better.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Robert Badgley on February 6, 2009
Format: DVD
Briefly issued individually,Warners has brought together three war time classic musicals and put them into one set called "Warner Brothers and the Homefront Collection";"This is The Army","Thank Your Lucky Stars" and "Hollywood Canteen".And you can thank your lucky stars too,as these movies belong in everyone's collections.
"This is the Army",my favourite among the three,raised more than nine million dollars for the Army Emergency relief fund in its' day,while its' stage counterpart of the previous year raised around a cool two million.One heck of a take and with good reason.Irving Berlin's original shows "Yip,Yip Yaphank" back in WW1 and "This is the Army" for WW2 were extraordinarily successful because they struck a chord not only with servicemen but for the families of servicemen also.Both sides of the "fence" so to speak, could relate to the material being performed before their appreciative eyes.Thus the movie,an amalgam of both Berlin show's, brings that same spirit to the screen and audiences ate every patriotic moment of it up,showing their appreciation at the box office in spades.The story revolves around George Murphy,a dancer by profession, who puts on "Yip,Yip Yaphank" during WW1.When the show ends for the cast the troupe all march off to war.Murphy comes home with an injured leg and is unable to dance again.When WW2 rears its ugly head Murphy gets the idea of putting on another show for the boys but with an updated theme.By this time his son,played by Ronald Reagan,is also in the service and agrees to help his father out.Ron has a girl but refuses to marry her saying that he wants to get the war out of the way first.It's a back and forth tug until eventually Ronald relents later in the film.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Eric Huffstutler on February 14, 2009
Format: DVD
There has been complaints that the newly restored "Irving Berlin's: This Is The Army" currently only available in the Warner Homefront Collection, isn't up to their usual quality. First, a little background is in order...

This is Warner's very first use of the 3-strip Technicolor process for a musical. Color stock was hard to get and discouraged during WWII. The film was made solely for the purpose of raising funds for the war effort and in 1950, the studio gave the film over to Army Emergency Relief then it fell into public domain in the 1970s. Original negative elements are most likely lost forever.

In 1991 the cable movie network AMC along with UCLA Film and Television Archive did a restoration of the film but the results ended up not so well with flickering and color shifts. All other copies available were so faded that they had a sepia tone color to them and it was one of these that Warner obviously worked from. The "saturation" of colors upon close inspection on a 1080p television shows that the film was "colorized" and there are times with details where you have glow and odd color edge enhancements due to register shifts giving a 3-D effect (without the glasses) on some background objects and people. Take a look at the mass of soldiers in one skit.. all of the faces are exactly identical in color and look like they cut and pasted 300 copies onto the frame. The only skit that looked fairly natural was the Harlem number where the African Americans skin tones were varied because they didn't have to colorize the sepia for their faces and uniforms like with the pinkish white actor faces. Grass, shrubs, clothing, even eye colors and hair all look "solid" and pop out unnaturally at times from the overlay of color and of course metal tones were off.
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