Homer Simpson Goes to Washington and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$42.49
Qty:1
  • List Price: $50.00
  • Save: $7.51 (15%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Homer Simpson Goes to Washington: American Politics through Popular Culture Hardcover – August 22, 2008


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$42.49
$19.85 $0.88

Frequently Bought Together

Homer Simpson Goes to Washington: American Politics through Popular Culture + Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle
Price for both: $52.20

Buy the selected items together

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for FREE. Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 282 pages
  • Publisher: The University Press of Kentucky; First Edition edition (August 22, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 081312512X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813125121
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,763,225 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this informative and entertaining essay collection, Foy largely succeeds at breaking down the artificial barriers between American politics and popular culture. Referencing films, television programs and other forms of mass entertainment—from Bob Dylan song lyrics to Dave Chappelle's show—as a lens through which to view abstract political ideas and teachings, each chapter breaks down a specific aspect of American government. Particularly illuminating are the essays distilling Hobbes and Locke's social contract theory through the dystopian eye of the Wachowski brothers' V for Vendetta and the world of political lobbying through Jason Reitman's satire Thank You for Smoking. For every fresh insight, however, there exists a simplistic summary of an overly examined film—Frank Capra's Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, for example—that dulls the collection, as do the essays that only peripherally link entertainment subjects to their intended ideas. Overall, however, Foy has compiled an energetic assortment of analyses that convincingly argue that an interest in popular culture can counterbalance the growing tide of political apathy in the United States. (Aug.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Winner of the 2008 Cawelti Award for the Best Textbook and Primer in Popular Culture." --



""This book collects interesting and illuminating commentaries on the relationships between popular culture and politics, and shows that popular culture can in fact provide pathways to discussion and better understanding of political phenomena."--Timothy M. Dale, coauthor of Political Thinking, Political Theory, and Civil Society" --



""This book offers a wide-ranging set of essays that document the vitality of American popular culture and its continuing relevance to our understanding of American politics. Looking at everything from movies and television to popular music and folk songs, the contributors explore the intersection of and the interaction between culture and politics in the modern American media."--Paul A. Cantor, author of Gilligan Unbound: Pop Culture in the Age of Globalization" --



""In this informative and entertaining essay collection, Foy largely succeeds at breaking down the 'artificial barriers' between American politics and popular culture.""Foy has compiled an energetic assortment of analyses that convincingly argue that an interest in popular culture can counterbalance the growing tide of political apathy in the United States."--Publishers Weekly" --



""In a society where more people are interested in voting for their favorite American idol than their next president, it is essential to have increasingly more literature and entertainment that is both interesting and educational."Jon Morris, The Forum" --



""Homer Simpson Goes to Washington accentuates the positives of what used to be called "low culture."-- Thomas Allen Heald, The Rapid City Weekly News" --



""The text would make an excellent supplement or resource in any number of popular culture and similar courses. Highly recommended."--Choice" --



""Homer Simpson Goes to Washington as a study of popular culture, as a barometer, disseminator and replicator of values and ideas is a useful and important exercise."--Megan Yarrow, MCreviews" --



""Will entice readers -- an audience of political science scholars, popular culture critics, and the average citizen looking to bridge the gap between the reality and the ideal of America."--Journal of Popular Culture" --



""Maybe those people who get all of their political news from The Daily Show aren't so far off track."--Politics" --

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Kiester on August 19, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a person about to re-enter the world of academia in the pursuit of a masters degree in political sociology, I picked up this book as a means of refreshing the basics. The title intrigued me as a fan of Jimmy Stewart and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. I hold a BA in both political science and sociology, and loved every minute of it!
I find that this collection of works would be well suited to many disciplines; be it political science, sociology, communications, or journalism. Each element of the political process is covered, from the offical institutions (executive, legislative, & judicairy) to the unoffical (media, lobbyists, and interest groups). Sources are as diverse as Democracy in America, The Federalist Papers, The Colbert Report, and of course, The Simpsons. As the first reviewer also noted, there is no need to be familiar with any or all of the "pop culture" references, because each author uses simple explanations and day-to-day analogies.
Homer Simpson Goes to Washington is a perfect example of its own thesis; a combination of education and entertainment!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Angele D. Mott Nickerson on August 17, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I purchased "Homer Simpson Goes To Washington" on the recommendation of a friend and I am very pleased that I did so. While I studied politics in college it has been a few years so the book was like a fun refresher course on media and government. There is no denying the two topics are linked and the goal of this book is to show that the connection has a positive place in our democratic society.

The book is written in essay form by multiple authors which makes you feel as if you are receiving the highlights of each author's knowledge. As with all books, some sections really stand out though the book as a whole reads very well. It of course makes liberal use of references to popular television shows, news shows, music and movies. I would be lying if I said I recognized all the references made to `pop culture' however the many authors did a great job of always getting their point across. Not once did I feel I missed the knowledge they were trying to share just because I had never watched the TV show or movie.

All and all this is a great book that covers an interesting and timely topic. It is not so overly intellectual that it talks down to the reader or makes you feel as if you are missing the point of the author's arguments. While the majority of people will talk about the melting of politics and entertainment (for good and bad depending on your view) this book provides actual, documented proof of how the general population is exposed everyday to this phenomenon. The fact of the mater is most people are moved in someway by the shows they watch and the music they listen to. We know our environments influence us so we should try to more deeply understand what those forces are and how they can change us.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By William Peate on August 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book contains an interesting and entertaining collection of essays that attempt to explore core concepts and questions in American government and politics through popular culture artifacts like "The Simpsons", "Chappelle's Show", "V for Vendetta", "Thank You for Smoking", "24", "The Daily Show" and more. Each chapter focuses on a particular element of politics ranging from political thought and culture to the presidency and Congress to ethical questions surrounding "enhanced interrogation techniques," and explains that using familiar examples from politically relevant shows, movies and music. The book got a good review from Publisher's Weekly and The New York Post, so I thought I would check it out. I was not disappointed. Although written by scholars in political science, philosophy, music, English, the law, history and cultural studies, this book is designed to be accessible to a casual observer of politics (or fans who are looking to thinking about their favorites tv shows or movies in a different light). Each author is mostly successful at achieving this goal, which makes this a good entrance into the study of American government and politics. Some of the more interesting issues raised were competing versions of the American dream as shown in The Simpsons, foundations for American political thought and the Declaration of Independence through "V for Vendetta," heroic images of the presidency in "The West Wing," racial and economic biases in the legal system using "Chappelle's Show," and critiques of pluralist democracy and interest group politics using the political satire "Thank You for Smoking." Readers may not be enthusiastic about every chapter contained in this book, but there is certainly enough there to keep almost anyone who has an interest in politics happy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search