Homesteading: A Backyard Guide to Growing Your Own Food,... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $6.47 (26%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: 100% guaranteed delivery with Fulfillment By Amazon. Pages of this book are clean. This book shows minor shelf wear associated with limited use. This is a former Library book with normal library stamping and stickers. Purchase of this item will benefit the Friends of the Houston Public Library.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Homesteading: A Backyard Guide to Growing Your Own Food, Canning, Keeping Chickens, Generating Your Own Energy, Crafting, Herbal Medicine, and More (Back to Basics Guides) Hardcover – November 1, 2009


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$18.48
$4.99 $4.89

Frequently Bought Together

Homesteading: A Backyard Guide to Growing Your Own Food, Canning, Keeping Chickens, Generating Your Own Energy, Crafting, Herbal Medicine, and More (Back to Basics Guides) + Back to Basics: A Complete Guide to Traditional Skills, Third Edition + Mini Farming: Self-Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre
Price for all three: $44.39

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New and Popular Cookbooks for Fall
Get inspired with new and popular cookbooks and other food-related titles in Fall into Cooking.

Product Details

  • Series: Back to Basics Guides
  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing (November 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1602397473
  • ISBN-13: 978-1602397477
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 11 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #159,513 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

From instructions on making your own composting toilet to trimming the toenails on your llamas, this back-the-land guide offers a vast wealth of resources for the eco-minded, twenty-first-century homesteader. The crowded chapters cover growing and harvesting food; keeping livestock (and building structures to house them); incorporating renewable energy technology, such as solar panels, into existing homes; making crafts, household items, and toys; homemade health remedies; and earth-friendly interior design. With so many topics introduced in such a limited space, it’s inevitable that some subjects are treated more superficially than others; for example, a spread on stress management, which includes tips such as “take a walk,” seems out of place in a title filled with so much targeted, useful advice. Best are the practical specifics, and even city dwellers with no interest in taking up beekeeping or basket weaving will enjoy browsing this for recipes, gardening ideas, and, as the introduction states, other accessible ways to “take a few steps closer to a healthier, happier, and more responsible lifestyle.” --Gillian Engberg

About the Author

Abigail R. Gehring is the editor of Back to Basics, Homesteading, and Self-Sufficiency, and author of Odd Jobs and Dangerous Jobs. She’s practiced living self-sufficiently since her childhood in Vermont, being home-schooled, home-canning jams and jellies, and enjoying natural crafts. She lives in New York City and Windham, Vermont.

More About the Author

Abigail R. Gehring is the author or editor of several books on country living skills, cooking, and baking. She's practiced living simply since her childhood in Vermont, helping build a log cabin, home-canning jams and jellies, and enjoying natural crafts. She's also the author of "Odd Jobs," "Dangerous Jobs," and "The Simple Joys of Grandparenting."


Customer Reviews

It has no index or TOC.
K. Rule
This is a wonderful book that I highly recommend to anyone who wants to get started with their own homestead.
L. Sullivan
This is a beautiful book for the pictures alone, the information is excellent and easy to follow.
T Kaaminii Stroh

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

61 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Penny L. Muzzey on November 21, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Growing up in the country, many of the aspects touched on in "Homesteading" were reminders of how I was raised. Yet, even though I had participated in many of the activities presented here (gardening, canning/freezing, raising animals, crafting), there were so many items and suggestions I had yet to discover! The step by step directions on how to make your own paper, or yogurt and butter, or the various natural herbal remedies discussed in "Homesteading" were great surprises for me. There are multitudes of magnificently bright, eye-catching pictures, and the text is easy to read. All of the directions for the various projects are very user friendly, with "quick tip boxes" throughout. Anyone new to simple, back to basics living will certainly benefit from this book, and if you're like me, this book might just be a bright reminder of days gone past - and days you'll want to enjoy again!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
334 of 380 people found the following review helpful By Earthmother on January 13, 2010
Format: Hardcover
If you are looking for real information on homesteading, this is NOT the book. At best the information is very general and almost worthless.

The author has information on buying food from CSAs, Co-ops,and farmers markets. How about more info on growing your own food. There's nothing on raising beef or pork.

In the section on dairy goats, she speaks about the breed La Mancha, yet the photo is NOT a LaMancha. The goat in the photo has ears, La Manchas don't have ears. Also although goats will eat some grass, they are poor grazers.

In the section of llamas there is a least one photo of alpacas.

In the sheep section, the author tells the reader to milk a sheep you must pull the sheep up to the fence so it can't get away, then she has you milking the animal from the front. What? I have all these animals, plus more.That's not even close to how milking is done.

I don't need a homesteading book to tell me how to hang wallpaper, or how to use Feng Shui to decorate my home.

The photos used for growing in a greenhouse are greenhouses that none of us can afford to buy. The same with the chapter on energy and the photos for solar panels and wind turbines.

Where's the info on building with recycled material?

This is a book for yuppies with lots of money who want to play "homestead."

This author does not know what she is writing about. There are many more worthwhile books out there.
13 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
52 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Fix-It on November 30, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I purchased this book thinking it would be a "compendium" on the topics involved in homesteading. Instead it is an overview or introduction to many topics. I like the fact that there is much to learn from this book, and it covers many, many topics, but few of them in depth. Worth buying if you are interested in the subject of self sufficiency, but it will make you want to get more books and materials to fill the gaps left by this book. For the price I'd buy it again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By K. Rule VINE VOICE on July 10, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My daughter is into self-sufficiency, so I bought her the printed copy of this book. She really liked the book.

I thought I'd catch a bargain and buy the Kindle book for a buck. I want my money back!

The Kindle version is poorly formatted. It has no index or TOC. Worse yet, there is a message every couple of pages that it was created with a demo/trial version of some epub software (doesn't that violate the EULA or something?).

Clearly, the Kindle version was just slapped together hoping nobody would complain with the low, low price. I guess you get what you pay for.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Kristina Seleshanko on December 27, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The first section of this book covers gardening, focusing not just on vegetables but on ornamentals, too. You'll find details on choosing the best location for a garden, testing and amending your soil, companion planting (what plants may grow best next to each other), making compost, irrigation (including how to make your own rain barrel - although the author neglects to mention that some cities and counties do not allow citizens to collect rain water), planting and caring for trees (a section oddly absent of information on fruit and nut trees), growing in containers, and rooftop gardens. There are even sections on growing plants without soil, attracting beneficial insects to your garden, and starting community and school garden. Beginners may find the wealth of information here a bit overwhelming, but it's nice to know you have all the details you'll need to start your own garden all in one location.

The next section covers the pantry, with information on choosing locally grown food, joining or starting a co-op, and a pretty extensive section on canning (including many recipes). There's a shorter section on drying and freezing, which includes a simple design for making a food dryer that hangs over a wood stove, plus a few pages on edible wild plants. This last section, while interesting and accompanied by photographs of each plant, isn't detailed enough, in my opinion. I don't feel the author stresses identifying safe and unsafe wild plants well enough.

The author also offers great information on making your own butter (in a jar), yogurt, ice cream (in a coffee can), beer, wine, and cheese. There are even basic instructions for making a cheese press for hard cheeses.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews