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Homo Erraticus


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Audio CD, April 15, 2014
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The new album from Jethro Tull frontman to be released on Calliandra Records in conjunction with Kscope on April 15th

In 2012 Ian Anderson released Thick As A Brick 2, the follow-up to Jethro Tull’s legendary concept album. The album was a critical and commercial success, charting around the world. In April he returns with Homo Erraticus, his new studio album.

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 15, 2014)
  • Original Release Date: 2014
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: KSCOPE
  • ASIN: B00IFSC02A
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (144 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #247,899 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Doggerland
2. Heavy Metals
3. Enter The Uninvited
4. Puer Ferox Adventus
5. Meliora Sequamur
6. The Turnpike Inn
7. The Engineer
8. The Pax Britannica
9. Tripudium Ad Bellum
10. After These Wars
11. New Blood, Old Veins
12. In For A Pound
13. The Browning of the Green
14. Per Errationes Ad Astra
15. Cold Dead Reckoning

Editorial Reviews

In 2012 Ian Anderson released Thick As A Brick 2, the follow-up to Jethro Tull s legendary concept album. The album was a critical and commercial success, charting around the world. In April he returns with Homo Erraticus, his new studio album.

The original Thick As A Brick album, released in 1972, was based around the poem of disgraced child prodigy Gerald Bostock. For Homo Erraticus Anderson is reunited with Bostock, using lyrics written by Gerald based on an old historical manuscript. The manuscript examines key events from throughout British history before going on to offer a number of prophecies for the future.

Suitably dramatised and exaggerated by Bostock as metaphors for modern life, he presented Anderson with ideas for 14 songs, which have now been set to music. The result is Homo Erraticus.

The album will be released on Anderson s own Calliandra Records label in conjunction with Kscope on April 15th.

Following the release of this Jethro Tull (in all but name) album, Ian and his band will be embarking on an extensive UK tour, where they will play the album in its entirety followed by a selection of Tull classics. These shows will be followed by further tours in Europe, America and more later in the year.

Customer Reviews

Witty lyrics and very creative musically.
Amazon Customer
If you like your music to be crafted for thinking people, give it a listen - or two.
The Guardian
Let's be clear- this is Ian Anderson at his best.
VASCO DA GAMA

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

62 of 68 people found the following review helpful By The Guardian TOP 500 REVIEWER on April 15, 2014
Format: MP3 Music
This is a review of the CD/DVD package of 'Homo Erraticus'; most of the review content still applies to the April 2014 CD-only release ASIN: B00IIZ2732 and the vinyl & download/autorip formats.

**********

In his 67th year, Ian Anderson stubbornly refuses to rest on his laurels and bask in past glories. `Homo Erraticus' is a remarkable piece of work: original, lyrical, thoughtful, musically sophisticated with excellent sound and production values, a storyboard weaving together many narrative strands to entertain and delight.

The first impression you'll receive from the CD/DVD package is that a great deal of thought and care has gone into this project: a quality, classy product greets you which respects the audience's intelligence and likely aesthetic sensibilities. The 32-page insert containing explanatory essays and all the song lyrics artistically laid out in sequence is a minor literary masterpiece on its own, and takes a good hour to read through and digest. The album tells a themed story of human colonization of the British Isles (which began, according to archaeological records, 800,000 years ago). Anderson begins in `Doggerland' with the continental land bridge at the end of the last ice age; the narrative then skips over the bronze and iron ages to `Enter the Uninvited' which quickly runs through all the influences which came in from outside:

"Angles, Saxons, Danes and Normans
On the whole a curve of learning,
...Willie Conker, work cut out, in Domesday pages marks our number...
Sheep and pigs amongst the hundreds,
Fat tithes and taxes to encumber"

All the way to:

"Bubble gum and google-bum, Facebook-frenzied social network
Apple mac and i-Phone App, Gibson,
Fender sonic fretwork...
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39 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Old Prog Lover on April 17, 2014
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
Kind of two reviews in one here as I really cannot review "Homo Erraticus" without also mentioning "Thick As A Brick 2"

Homo Erraticus (The Wondering Man) is simply put a good rock album! Ian Anderson, at age 67 has lost little except his hair. (And this reviewer can relate to that.) His voice shows a little weakness, or maybe better put "mellowing" but to me is still quite strong for 67, and if anything, his musicianship on all instruments has only become better and more sophisticated. While I do not perceive HE as a concept album I do see it as a themed album. It is divided into three themes: Chronicles, Prophesies, and Revelations; with the songs contained therein pertaining to each of the themes. Ian once again relies on his alter ego Gerald Bostock to pen songs about occurrences in British history and musings towards the future. Some song titles are near impossible to pronounce and the words often cryptic. As we often come expect from Gerald!

Mr. Anderson definitely shows maturity but he does not show mundaneness. So many maturing performers of the 70's and 80's turn their maturity into boredom; thinking now is the time for ballads and reflection when their fan base does not feel the same way. Yeah, we still wanna rock, at least a little! Ian Anderson is not guilty of this on HE. As holds true on every Ian Anderson album, and Jethro Tull album, since the beginning, HE has a nice mixture of both acoustic and full band electric numbers. Many numbers flip back and forth between acoustic and electric. The electric songs dominate.

Tempo wise, it is the same "Thick as a Brick 2", which is likewise a decent album. I would definitely put these albums in the same vein as "Songs From the Wood" and "Heavy Horses".
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37 of 41 people found the following review helpful By AuntieSash on April 15, 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I've listened the the album straight through 4 times now. The two tracks that will clearly be my favorites (for now) - Puer Ferox Adventus and The Browning of the Green - have been replayed several more times. Almost have the words down for the former (thank you Sir Ian Anderson for including the lyrics in the insert).

You've probably figured out that I'm liking this CD. It feels at once fresh and familiar. The rich, perfectly structured chaos of sound, lyrics witty and pointy, and the mischievous energy - everything I hoped and expected!!

I'm a fan and I love it. My coworkers (who say "the Aqualung guy?") are enjoying it today as well.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Mike Bender on June 20, 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This will be a controversial pronouncement, but I stand by it: In my opinion, Homo Erraticus is the best Ian Anderson album ever, the best Tull album since Songs From The Wood, and the most fully realized progressive-rock "concept album" in the entire Tull/Anderson repertoire.

I'm so glad that Ian Anderson has finally made peace with an idea that I embraced years ago: that Anderson is Tull is Anderson. By finally accepting this, Ian Anderson has been freed from the apparent need to somehow distinguish his "solo" work from his "band" work, and the music is all the stronger for it. Being "Mr Tull" isn't such a bad thing after all.

With TAAB2, there was a conscious decision to use the "same palette and same instrumental colors" as on the original TAAB: Gibson guitar, Fender bass, drums, keyboard and flute. This philosophy is continued on Homo Erraticus to great effect. This album simply sounds like a Jethro Tull record--from before the age of synthesizers and Indian themes. It is as familiar and comfortable as an old suit newly cleaned and pressed.

Thick As A Brick--a masterpiece that I absolutely adore--was never meant to be a serious prog-rock concept album. As Ian Anderson has said many times over the years, it was really more of a parody of the form (but which ended up virtually defining it!). A Passion Play was hastily thrown together after the Chateau d'Isaster sessions and it shows; the album has its moments, but it never reaches the quality of TAAB. TAAB2 is a brilliant follow-up to TAAB, but the songs are mostly fragments with a few odd bits that Ian had lying around (e.g. "Pebbles Instrumental" & "A Change of Horses"). It's fun to revisit some of the motifs from TAAB, but it pales in comparison to the original.
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