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Homo Hierarchicus: The Caste System and Its Implications (Nature of Human Society) Paperback – January 15, 1981

ISBN-13: 978-0226169637 ISBN-10: 0226169634 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Series: Nature of Human Society
  • Paperback: 540 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; 2 edition (January 15, 1981)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226169634
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226169637
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.4 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,099,830 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, French (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By C. Booth on December 2, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This text is not REALLY about caste. It is similar to Strathern's Gender of the Gift and her use of "Melanesia". Just as her book was epistemology rather than ethnography, so is Dumont's treatment of this phenomenon. He is actually using the theory of caste to explain his notion of hierarchy as the basic supposition within a culture as opposed to the western notions of equality/individualism. He, throughout the book, refers to the difference between IDEAL hierarchy (where power is completely subordinate to status) and CONCRETE hierarchy (where status is not absolute!). I would say this is a difficult text to begin with...and if you are looking for an ethnographic account of caste, you may find this text difficult to understand and disappointing. However, is you consider this an intellectual exercise in the nature of hierarchy and equality, you cannot find a better text!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Etienne ROLLAND-PIEGUE on April 1, 2013
Format: Paperback
The posterity of Louis Dumont in French social science presents us with a paradox. Few French anthropologists claim his heritage. When they look for ancestor figures or sources of inspiration, they are more likely to turn to Durkheim and Mauss, whose teachings Dumont placed above all else, or to Marx and Weber, two other revered founders of the discipline. Unlike Claude Lévi-Strauss with structuralism, or to Maurice Godelier with Marxist anthropology, Dumont hasn't associated his name to a chapel or a school within French anthropology. Likewise, the field of Indianist studies in French or English-speaking academia has not really adopted Louis Dumont. It is now mandatory for any book on the caste system to begin by harshly criticizing Homo Hierarchicus, which indeed was a provocative thesis at the time of its publication in 1966. Monographies based on fieldwork do not really address the theoretical issues that Dumont tried to tackle, and they use different sources and materials. Indianist studies in France are now more atuned to contemporary debates in the English-speaking world than to the Durkheimian tradition cultivated by Marcel Mauss and Célestin Bouglé, which Dumont attempted to renew and expand.

Meanwhile, Dumont has found heirs and epigones among philosophers and social scientists in France. The publication of Homo Hierarchicus coincided with a Tocquevillian turn in French political thought, and Dumont became an often quoted reference. It is to be remembered that Tocqueville had planned to write a book on India that would have completed his exploration of Democracy in America and his account of French society between the Old Regime and the Revolution.
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10 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Bruijns on August 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
Allthough a classic, the style was horrible. Even for somebody whose mothertongue is english, this book must be difficult to read. Why is it that French intelectuals think they have to explain everything as difficult as possible. I finished because I was on an Island with nothing else to read, but it didn't teach me much about the cast system. Not because the information is not in te book, but because it was burried under to many, not relevant information, and written in a hard to follow style.
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