Qty:1
  • List Price: $8.99
  • Save: $1.62 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Honey Bunny Funnybunny (Beginner Books(R)) Hardcover – January 21, 1997


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$7.37
$3.19 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Honey Bunny Funnybunny (Beginner Books(R)) + It's Not Easy Being a Bunny (Beginner Books(R)) + P. J. Funnybunny Camps Out (Step into Reading)
Price for all three: $20.25

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Gifts for Young Readers
Visit our Children's Books store to find great gifts for every child. Shop by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 2
  • Series: Beginner Books(R)
  • Hardcover: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers (January 21, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679881816
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679881810
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 0.4 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,599 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

It's not easy being Honey Bunny Funnybunny--P.J. Funnybunny's little sister. Like most big brothers, P.J. loves to tease and play jokes on his little sister. Poor patient Honey Bunny puts up with almost everything. But the jokes stop short when P.J. paints the sleeping Honey Bunny's face bright green. Mr. and Mrs. Funnybunny are hopping mad...From now on, things are going to be different in the Funnybunny household! But does Honey Bunny really want something different?  

More About the Author

With a degree in art, Marilyn always assumed she would be an illustrator. But when, early in her career, she was presented with an opportunity to write, she seized it and quickly discovered that she had found her true love. No sad, sappy stories for her, however. She likes to make herself laugh and with that her characters usually end up looking pretty silly for one reason or another.

Her first children's book featured a fastidious little English boy named Alistair Grittle and was originally created for the English publisher, Hamish Hamilton, as well as for Simon & Schuster in the United States. Having created a boy with such perfect behavior, she then turned her attention to a not so perfectly behaved little boy. His name was P.J. Funnybunny, and he has existed for many years in a series of books for Random House, including highly prestigious spots in the Dr. Seuss Cat In the Hat series.

Marilyn's television credits include two PBS Reading Rainbow programs featuring Alistair, an Alistair program for the BBC, three ABC Weekend Specials featuring P.J. Funnybunny, and a show based on her children's book, "Elizabeth and Larry", for Showtime's Shelley Duvall's Bedtime Stories.

Between 1999 and 2004, The Disney Channel produced three Original Movies based on Marilyn's book, "Zenon, Girl of the 21st Century". Each of Disney's Zenon movies had exceptionally high ratings, with "Zenon, Girl of the 21st Century" and "Zenon the Zequel" among the highest rated shows in the history of The Disney Channel.

In 2004, Playhouse Disney began production on Marilyn's animated series, "Handy Manny". "Handy Manny" premiered September 16, 2006, as the highest rated Playhouse Disney series premiere of all time. Since its debut, "Handy Manny" has averaged approximately 2 million viewers a week, has generated consistent critical acclaim and has developed a deeply loyal audience.

In 2009, Marilyn was nominated for an Emmy Award as Executive Producer of Handy Manny in the category of "Outstanding Special Class Animated Program".

Customer Reviews

Please do not order this book for ANY child!
Johnny Gomer
They tell her brother to stop teasing her, but do not explain to her brother that there are better ways to show love, and that teasing is cruel and benefits no one.
Wendy Stroud
I also thought of writing to the publisher - but am contenting myself with this.
Jessica Sirotin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jessica Sirotin on November 13, 2000
Format: Hardcover
To excuse the bizarre and inappropriate storyline of this book as the product of deranged and PC minds is ridiculous. I actually read the stroy several times to my young son before I actually thought about what it was saying. Basically the young female only feels that her brother loves her if he mistreats her! The amount of abuse he seems to heap on her seems excessive and cruel. Even more so, in fact than painting her face. That she misses this attention seems disturbing to say the least.
I have passed this book around to several adult acquaintances and simply asked them to take a look at it and most have had the same reaction.
I also thought of writing to the publisher - but am contenting myself with this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 10, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Although I do not often become too excited about the negative aspects of children's book, I feel the negatives in this one outweigh the positive.
Little sister learns that the wrong kind of attention is better than no attention at all; that you can EITHER be abused or neglected. That having polka dots painted on your face (or maybe scratches or bruises) is some kinds of a sign of affection or love.
Brother learns that withholding love makes you a winner and makes you so you never have to apologize.
These "lessons" are shown everyday in our schoolyards where our kids are teased cruelly. We don't need books, let alone children's books, to show us this, to extol this.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 6, 1998
Format: Hardcover
We bought this book for my daughter based on the Dr. Seuss logo on the cover and the cute illustration of the little girl bunny rabbit. While the book's exterior is innocent enough, I'm very dubious about the message this children's story sends to young girls, such as my 6-year-old daughter.
The story involves a big brother bunny, P.J., and his little sister, Honeybunny, whom he torments relentlessly. He stops when he is punished by his parents for some particularly egregious prank and then completely ignores his little sister. On one page he is shown haughtily ignoring Honeybunny, obviously in retaliation for the "crime" of reporting one of his viscious pranks.
Eventually, Honeybunny becomes depressed that she's no longer getting attention from her abusive older brother. At the conclusion, she is relieved when P.J. once again resumes his cruel pranks by painting her face during her sleep.
What sort of message is this story supposed to send to young girls? That they should tolerate, even welcome cruel and abusive behavior from male family members and by extension, males with whom they develop relationships?
I consider myself a pretty easygoing person and I don't mean to make too much of a children's book, but kids can be impressionable, and I was very disturbed by the message this books conveys to children, especially girls. I've long considered writing the publisher and complaining, but for now this forum will have to do.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Wendy Stroud on March 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book packaged along with 2 other Dr. Suess books I wanted. When I read Honey Bunny Funnybunny to my 5 yr old daughter, I quickly decided we would not be keeping the book. Honey Bunny is teased unmercifully by her older brother. When she objects her parents intervene. They tell her brother to stop teasing her, but do not explain to her brother that there are better ways to show love, and that teasing is cruel and benefits no one. So brother withdraws his attention from Honey Bunny and she decides teasing is better than no attention at all. I feel this is a very bad message that teasing is OK. Teasing is not OK. Teasing is cruel. Perhaps a different sort of book would model for young boys how to really show love instead of reinforcing that they can just act mean instead.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 12, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is a wonderful book for children if you want boys to think it is their right to abuse girls and for girls to think they have to endure abuse in order to be accepted. It teaches boys that to withhold affection is the key to success. I really can't believe that a female wrote this book, as it is about as blatantly chauvinistic and "old school thinking" as I have read in years. Children are impressionable by what they see on television and what they read; to think otherwise is having your head buried in the sand. This book does not portray acceptable behavioral patterns for people of any age.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Panchita C on April 30, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I really can't stand this book, would never buy it for any child, and would give it negative stars if I could. It gives an awful message, especially to young girls, that abusive behavior is a sign of love. I can't imagine why anyone would want to read this story to a child.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By stewzle on December 13, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book does not send a message in line with other Seuss books such as Horton Hears a Who and The Lorax. The stories written by Dr Seuss were either nonsensical fun, or morality stories wrapped in made-up language that appeals to children. The story of Hunnybunny Funnybunny by Margaret Sadler is neither. While on the surface it is a tale of sibling rivalry, it really is more about preferring negative attention rather than none at all.
PJ Funnybunny's "teasing" of his sister Hunnybunny is sometimes silly, but sometimes legitimately punishable offenses. How many parents would laugh if their child "poured mashed carrots" on his or her sibling's head "everynight" as PJ does to Hunnybunny? Or if one sibling painting the others' face during the night? And the Funnybunny parents do nothing until Hunnybunny finally complains? It is very sad when in the end Hunnybunny translates this persistent torture into "love", preferring it to PJ's disregard, and her mother reinforces this. We can only assume that after Hunnybunny hugs her brother for painting her face bright blue while she slept, he goes back to humiliating her in various ways.
The parents who laugh this off as a funny, harmless story are forgetting that self-esteem is built when children are very young. How they are treated by their parents and siblings shapes how they allow others in their lives to treat them. My husband bought this (without reading it first, as we usually do) because my daughter asked for it (because the cover is pink). He was horrified when he read it, as was I. We have removed it from our children's book collection, because this story reinforces negative behavior and reactions to that behavior. I not only do not recommend it, I steer people away from it at every opportunity.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?