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Honey, Honey, Miss Thang: Being Black, Gay, and on the Streets Paperback – September 18, 1996


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Honey, Honey, Miss Thang: Being Black, Gay, and on the Streets + Brothers and Keepers: A Memoir
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 270 pages
  • Publisher: Temple University Press (September 18, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1566394988
  • ISBN-13: 978-1566394987
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,302,980 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Using the first person accounts of five African American, drug-using, street-walking, cross-dressing gay hustlers, Pettiway, a professor of criminal justice at Indiana University, breaks free of some criminologists' tendency to view the marginalized as monolithically deviant, negative or hopeless. In his lengthy, moving introduction, Pettiway argues that the lives of his five subjects-Shontae, China, Keisha, Detra and Monique-are unique, individual experiences whose power, courage, faith, creativity and struggle for survival transcend mere sociological or criminological statistics. His goal is to present them "more nearly as they experience themselves" and to suggest policies that more closely address their understanding of who they are. The autobiographical chronicles reveal a complexity and depth, even when painful: Shontae, for instance, recalls being paid 50 cents to have sex with an older male cousin every Sunday and bargaining for an increase. Detra recalls her mother teaching her children how to bounce checks, and how one policeman, coming to confiscate stolen property, tried to keep the family from embarrassment by pretending he was taking it for repairs. The chronicles share common themes, such as strong bonds to mothers and, perhaps surprising to many, a strong streak of self-responsibility and accountability. China and Keisha echo each other, saying that they have no one to blame but themselves, while Shontae points out, "I didn't have a disturbed childhood. It was not family beatings... they barely cursed."

Copyright 1996 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Review

"Using the first person accounts of five African American, drug-using, street-walking, cross-dressing gay hustlers, Pettiway, a professor of criminal justice at Indiana University, breaks free of some criminologists' tendency to view the marginalized as monolithically deviant, negative or hopeless. ...His goal is to present them 'more nearly as they experience themselves' and to suggest policies that more closely address their understanding of who they are." --Publishers Weekly

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 3, 1998
Format: Paperback
i grew up in a small southern town that was fantastically inhabited by what seemed an inordinate number of flamboyant black drag queens. as a child i marveled at their screaming visibility, and always kept one eye peeled for a glimpse of a sashaying stormy or randy ball or any of the other girls, now long dead. as a grown woman (gay, incidentally) living in a much larger, but still southern city, i remain fascinated by the miss thangs that i encounter in clubs and on street corners. this book is a raw and unflinching peek into the lives of five ordinarily extraordinary queens, who live their scarred and often dismaying lives with an amazing lack of self-pity and an equally amazing joie de vivre. i recommend!
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